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Re: [Sn3] Staging Questions

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  • Marty McGuirk
    ... From: h81644 [mailto:H81644@frontiernet.net] Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2003 7:22 PM To: Sn3@yahoogroups.com Subject: [Sn3] Staging Questions Hi Folks, I am
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 16, 2003
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      -----Original Message-----
      From: h81644 [mailto:H81644@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2003 7:22 PM
      To: Sn3@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Sn3] Staging Questions

      Hi Folks,
      I am not a Sn3 modeler but have followed this list now for a couple
      of years.

      In following several standard guage lists, staging yards and their
      location and access are prime subjects. On this list I see very
      little reference to staging yards. Do most of you guys not use them
      because of the type of operations. Small number of locomotives and a
      lot of out and back operation.

      I know on my plans for a Silverton Northern it would have been about
      three trains a day out and back. Is this the way most of your
      layouts work. I see very little about operation on the various
      layouts. Operations just to small to have a number of people
      involved?

      Thanks,
      George

      ************************************************************************
      ********8
      George,

      I don't think it's a matter of operations being too "small" to have a
      number of people involved. Frankly, many standard gauge layouts I've
      operated on run a schedule similar to MetroNorth out of Grand Central
      -- far more trains than the modeled segment would ever support. I'd
      agree that "operations," at least perhaps in the OPSIG sense of the
      term, is pretty far down the list of priorities for many narrow gauge
      modelers I've met. Somewhat ironically, narrow gaugers have been
      building layouts based on prototype scenes far longer than standard
      gauge modelers, so there is no reason many narrow gauge layouts
      couldn't be operated prototypically.

      There are some exceptions to this of course, and lots of narrow gauge
      railroads were built to operate. Some of those folks are on this and
      other lists do just that -- I'll let them speak for themselves.

      You asked about staging yards. I can think of a few reasons you don't
      often see them on narrow gauge layouts:

      1. Most narrow gauge lines were captive, and therefore many times there
      is little need to depict the rest of the continent.
      2. The stuff costs a lot -- in time even more so than money -- so to
      run anything more than a couple of trains without completely
      interrupting the session the equipment often needs to be recycled. For
      that a visible yard that makes up and breaks down trains works just as
      well as staging.
      3. The answer to (2) may well be reverse loop type staging except that
      many narrow gauge engines, especially the larger Colorado/NMex
      locomotives that depict the kind of railroading that would attract
      operators in the first place, are absolute curve hogs. And finding room
      for big loops like that quickly eats up space in all but the largest
      room. You can get an Sn3 engine around a 24" curve, but not a K-28 --
      that like things kept in the 36" range to be reliable.

      My new Sn3 Chili Line was certainly designed for operation. My intitial
      plans call for the Santa Fe yard at one end of the line, which takes
      care of the staging concerns on one end of the line. For the northern
      end of the line, beyond Taos Junction, I've planned a stub ended yard
      under the town of Espanola (all that will fit, since there is no space
      for turnback loops) with a turntable on one end of the line. There is a
      slight alcove behind the town, enough space for an operator to fit
      comfortably and be out of the way of the main aisle. The staging yard
      is viewed from the rear and this "alcove" operator will serve the role
      of fiddle yard operator -- turning equipment as needed to keep feeding
      trains for the operating session.

      To create a little more operating interested than the prototype
      schedule during the "K-class" era I'm modeling, I decided to run the
      1919 schedule with the more modern equipment. This hardly makes it a
      commuter operation, but it will be enough to keep 4-6 operators busy in
      a low-key TT&TO environment.

      For those of you who know me -- or even those of you who don't -- and
      are curious about more details feel free to ask.

      Marty




      -----Original Message-----
      From: h81644 [mailto:H81644@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2003 7:22 PM
      To: Sn3@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Sn3] Staging Questions

      Hi Folks,
      I am not a Sn3 modeler but have followed this list now for a couple
      of years.

      In following several standard guage lists, staging yards and their
      location and access are prime subjects. On this list I see very
      little reference to staging yards. Do most of you guys not use them
      because of the type of operations. Small number of locomotives and a
      lot of out and back operation.

      I know on my plans for a Silverton Northern it would have been about
      three trains a day out and back. Is this the way most of your
      layouts work. I see very little about operation on the various
      layouts. Operations just to small to have a number of people
      involved?

      Thanks,
      George
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