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How do I measure if NVC is working?

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  • Lisa
    Aloha! It s Lisa again. I m learning how to do NVC research. My question: how do I measure if NVC is working? If I go into an organization, randomly assign
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 2, 2011
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      DailyGood.org

      Aloha!

      It’s Lisa again.  I’m learning how to do NVC research.  My question:  how do I measure if NVC is working?

      If I go into an organization, randomly assign 50 people to a control group, and 50 people to an experimental group...  If I take the experimental group, and teach them NVC...

      How do I measure if NVC is working?  How do I test the participants, before and after?  How do I take something that is subjective and personal, and make it objective, turn it into numbers?   How do I take a quantity, and turn it into a quality?  I’m looking for as many different options as this group can give me. 

      You can reply to the group, or you can reach me at nvcLisa@...   Mahalo (thank you) for your kokua (help and support).     Lisa ;-) 

       

    • Tom Caruso
      Hi Lisa, So this is a good question for sharing answers with the group. How do I measure if NVC is working? That depends on how you define what NVC is
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 2, 2011
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        Hi Lisa,

        So this is a good question for sharing answers with the group.

        How do I measure if NVC is working?  

        That depends on how you define what "NVC is working" means.  So for our NVC in Schools study we measured a number of factors.  
        1. We measured perceptions of the students about the school environment to see if we might see some difference before and after the trainings, and we were able to compare the perceptions of the control group and the group that received the trainings.  We also did these surveys before and after the experimen with the parents of the students and with the teachers to see if there might be differences we could notice in their perceptions between the controls and the experimental groups.
        2. We obtained discipline reports of the students in both the control and experimental groups to see if there might be a difference.  It would have been nice to get these reports before the experiment for both groups as well, but that was not possible.
        3. We obtained standardized test scores to determine if there may have been an effect of NVC on the ability of students to focus on their studies and thereby do better at learning.  Again, it would have been best to have test scores we could compare from before and after the experiment for both groups, but we could only compare the two groups following the training.

        How do I test the participants, before and after?  

        You simply administer the same test before and after the experimental period.  I'd recommend a long period of training for effects to develop.  If you were to test after only one month, differences would be less likely than after 6 months, but don't go for too long or too many other factors could confound your results, such as changes in the environment.

        How do I take something that is subjective and personal, and make it objective, turn it into numbers?   

        Surveys are translated into codes.  Frequently questions are scales that can easily be coded, then other times coders looking at the questionaires need to make judgments about the text, putting it into a category that can be coded.  In these circumstances the coders must be "blind" to whether someone was trained or not trained since, knowing, they might create some bias as they code the information.

        In another research project we trained counselors in a juvenile residence home and had an independent "blind" observer (Andrea Nash who wrote this up as her Masters Thesis at Virginia Tech) categorized violence resolution behaviors as violent or non-violent.  She didn't know which trainers were trained (as I said, she was "blind" to the treatment of the counselors) so she was able to later look at her coding of this violence resolution behavior to determine whether the counselors who were trained used more violence resolutions behavior than those who did not get trained with NVC.  As a matter of fact, that is what she found.

        How do I take a quantity, and turn it into a quality?  

        I think you mean how do you turn a quality into a quantity.  I explain that above.  It's by first grading the quality and then coding it.

        Let me give a simple example:

        A question requiring either a yes or a no is coded with "1" for "yes" and "2" for "no".

        Or another common one is:
        • Strongly Agree (2)
        • Agree (1)
        • Disagree (-1)
        • Strongly Disagree (-2)
        A large number of scales are provided here:


        It is best to use a survey instrument that has been validated as measuring what it says it measures.  This requires some effort and a great number of previous tests.  Usually these tests are backed up with papers that verify their validity with the papers detailing the research that was done to validate the test.  You can find many validated tests online.  These tests will have instructions for coding the information.

        Tom

        On Wed, Nov 2, 2011 at 2:17 PM, Lisa <nvclisa@...> wrote:
         

        Aloha!

        It’s Lisa again.  I’m learning how to do NVC research.  My question:  how do I measure if NVC is working?

        If I go into an organization, randomly assign 50 people to a control group, and 50 people to an experimental group...  If I take the experimental group, and teach them NVC...

        How do I measure if NVC is working?  How do I test the participants, before and after?  How do I take something that is subjective and personal, and make it objective, turn it into numbers?   How do I take a quantity, and turn it into a quality?  I’m looking for as many different options as this group can give me. 

        You can reply to the group, or you can reach me at nvcLisa@...   Mahalo (thank you) for your kokua (help and support).     Lisa ;-) 

         




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        Thomas P. Caruso, PhD, MBA, PMP
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