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Hedeoma acinoides

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  • steve_and_eve
    Hedeoma acinoides (known also as annual pennyroyal, mock pennyroyal, and slender false pennyroyal) has a wonderful lemon scent; in fact the epithet acinoides
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 18, 2009
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      Hedeoma acinoides (known also as annual pennyroyal, mock pennyroyal, and slender false pennyroyal) has a wonderful lemon scent; in fact the epithet acinoides means "like akinos," which was an aromatic herb known to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Does anyone know if it is safe to use our native species as a seasoning for food? Have any of you tried it and lived to tell the tale?

      (By the way, although this is supposed to be a spring-blooming plant, I found bunches of it flowering away in the Great Hills section of Austin yesterday).
    • Mike Rock
      ... . ... Pennyroyal is toxic and especially should not be ingested by expectant mothers as it is an abortifacient. mike -- http://www.mike-rock.com
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 18, 2009
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        On Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 5:38 AM, steve_and_eve <serendipity@...> wrote:
         

        Hedeoma acinoides (known also as annual pennyroyal, mock pennyroyal, and slender false pennyroyal) has a wonderful lemon scent; in fact the epithet acinoides means "like akinos," which was an aromatic herb known to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Does anyone know if it is safe to use our native species as a seasoning for food? Have any of you tried it and lived to tell the tale?

        (By the way, although this is supposed to be a spring-blooming plant, I found bunches of it flowering away in the Great Hills section of Austin yesterday).
         

        .

        __,_._,__
        Pennyroyal is toxic and especially should not be ingested by expectant mothers as it is an abortifacient.

        mike

        --
        http://www.mike-rock.com
      • Mike Rock
        ... Oh, to amplify this, pregnant women should not even handle the plant or the leaves, the active principles can be absorbed through the skin. mike Austin --
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 18, 2009
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          On Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 7:52 AM, Mike Rock <mikerockatx@...> wrote:


          On Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 5:38 AM, steve_and_eve <serendipity@...> wrote:
           

          Hedeoma acinoides (known also as annual pennyroyal, mock pennyroyal, and slender false pennyroyal) has a wonderful lemon scent; in fact the epithet acinoides means "like akinos," which was an aromatic herb known to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Does anyone know if it is safe to use our native species as a seasoning for food? Have any of you tried it and lived to tell the tale?

          (By the way, although this is supposed to be a spring-blooming plant, I found bunches of it flowering away in the Great Hills section of Austin yesterday).
           

          .

          __,_._,__
          Pennyroyal is toxic and especially should not be ingested by expectant mothers as it is an abortifacient.

          mike


          Oh, to amplify this, pregnant women should not even handle the plant or the leaves, the active principles can be absorbed through the skin.

          mike

          Austin

          --
          http://www.mike-rock.com
        • Beverly Howard
          Yes, it is true that Pennyroyal is toxic From wikipedia: Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium) is a plant in the mint genus, within the family Lamiaceae. Crushed
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 18, 2009
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            Yes, it is true that Pennyroyal is toxic From wikipedia:
             
            Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium) is a plant in the mint genus, within the family Lamiaceae. Crushed Pennyroyal leaves exhibit a very strong fragrance similar to spearmint. Pennyroyal is a traditional culinary herb, folk remedy, and abortifacient. The essential oil of pennyroyal is used in aromatherapy, and is also high in pulegone, a highly toxic volatile organic compound affecting liver and uterine function
             
            But, the question was about Mock Pennyroyal, Hedeoma acinoides. Considering that there are many safe plants in the same genus as true pennyroyal, having the common name Pennyroyal gives no information about the safety of false pennyroyal. I wasnt able to find any in a quick googling but I did find out that UT has many herbarium photos online. Also there is an interesting site http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/
            which seems to be like google books for biology. I was able to look at various old botany book pages references to Hedeoma acinoides but saw not toxicity info.
            Beverly


             
            On Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 7:52 AM, Mike Rock <mikerockatx@...> wrote:


            On Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 5:38 AM, steve_and_eve <serendipity@...> wrote:
             

            Hedeoma acinoides (known also as annual pennyroyal, mock pennyroyal, and slender false pennyroyal) has a wonderful lemon scent; in fact the epithet acinoides means "like akinos," which was an aromatic herb known to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Does anyone know if it is safe to use our native species as a seasoning for food? Have any of you tried it and lived to tell the tale?

            (By the way, although this is supposed to be a spring-blooming plant, I found bunches of it flowering away in the Great Hills section of Austin yesterday).
             

            .

            __,_._,__
            Pennyroyal is toxic and especially should not be ingested by expectant mothers as it is an abortifacient.

            mike


            Oh, to amplify this, pregnant women should not even handle the plant or the leaves, the active principles can be absorbed through the skin.

            mike

            Austin

            --
            http://www.mike-rock.com
          • Dean Garrett
            I assume that Delena Tull, author of Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest, has at least tried it as a tea, because she writes: The small
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 18, 2009
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              I assume that Delena Tull, author of Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest, has at least tried it as a tea, because she writes:

              "The small sweet-scented hedeomas provide delightful teas that I consider among the best wild teas in the state. Use both the leaves and the flowers of these mints to produce a lemony or minty-flavored infusion."

              She also notes that species Hedeoma pulegioides (not native to Texas) has been used as an abortifacient and that any species also repels insects, as many minty-spelling plants will.

              So at least infusions appear to be safe. Don't know about dried parts, though.

              > To: NPSOT-NPAT@yahoogroups.com
              > From: serendipity@...
              > Date: Fri, 18 Sep 2009 10:38:39 +0000
              > Subject: [NPSOT-NPAT] Hedeoma acinoides
              >
              > Hedeoma acinoides (known also as annual pennyroyal, mock pennyroyal, and slender false pennyroyal) has a wonderful lemon scent; in fact the epithet acinoides means "like akinos," which was an aromatic herb known to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Does anyone know if it is safe to use our native species as a seasoning for food? Have any of you tried it and lived to tell the tale?
              >
              > (By the way, although this is supposed to be a spring-blooming plant, I found bunches of it flowering away in the Great Hills section of Austin yesterday).
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
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            • Betty Dunn
              I m not sure of the species, but I first knew a plant by the common name Pennyroyal as a child where I grew up in eastern TN. There was a little colony of it
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 18, 2009
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                I'm not sure of the species, but I first knew a plant by the common name Pennyroyal as a child where I grew up in eastern TN.  There was a little colony of it growing in the same place near our house each year.  I'm not sure if it was perenniel or annual.   My mother frequently made a tea from it, which was a very pleasant drink.  We also crushed freshley gathered plant tops and smeared them all over our bodies and clothes when we started on a walk into the woods.  It did have a distinctive and nice minty smell.  The purpose of this was to repel chiggers, and it seemed to work!
                 
                Betty
                Boerne
                 

                To: npsot-npat@yahoogroups.com
                From: deangarrett@...
                Date: Fri, 18 Sep 2009 19:54:20 +0000
                Subject: RE: [NPSOT-NPAT] Hedeoma acinoides

                 
                I assume that Delena Tull, author of Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest, has at least tried it as a tea, because she writes:

                "The small sweet-scented hedeomas provide delightful teas that I consider among the best wild teas in the state. Use both the leaves and the flowers of these mints to produce a lemony or minty-flavored infusion."

                She also notes that species Hedeoma pulegioides (not native to Texas) has been used as an abortifacient and that any species also repels insects, as many minty-spelling plants will.

                So at least infusions appear to be safe. Don't know about dried parts, though.

                > To: NPSOT-NPAT@yahoogro ups.com
                > From: serendipity@ austin.rr. com
                > Date: Fri, 18 Sep 2009 10:38:39 +0000
                > Subject: [NPSOT-NPAT] Hedeoma acinoides
                >
                > Hedeoma acinoides (known also as annual pennyroyal, mock pennyroyal, and slender false pennyroyal) has a wonderful lemon scent; in fact the epithet acinoides means "like akinos," which was an aromatic herb known to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Does anyone know if it is safe to use our native species as a seasoning for food? Have any of you tried it and lived to tell the tale?
                >
                > (By the way, although this is supposed to be a spring-blooming plant, I found bunches of it flowering away in the Great Hills section of Austin yesterday).
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                >
                > Here are some addresses that will help you with your membership.
                >
                > Write to the list NPSOT-NPAT@yahoogro ups.com
                > Write to the Owners NPSOT-NPAT-Owner@ yahoogroups. com
                > Subscribe NPSOT-NPAT-Subscrib e@yahoogroups. com
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              • John Carpenter
                It can be put into dog s bedding to repel fleas..... Procrastinate NOW!  Don t put it off!  Ellen de Generes ... From: Betty Dunn
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 18, 2009
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                  It can be put into dog's bedding to repel fleas.....

                  Procrastinate NOW!  Don't put it off!  Ellen de Generes


                  --- On Fri, 9/18/09, Betty Dunn <bebsd@...> wrote:

                  From: Betty Dunn <bebsd@...>
                  Subject: RE: [NPSOT-NPAT] Hedeoma acinoides
                  To: "NPSOT List" <npsot-npat@yahoogroups.com>
                  Date: Friday, September 18, 2009, 4:51 PM

                   

                  I'm not sure of the species, but I first knew a plant by the common name Pennyroyal as a child where I grew up in eastern TN.  There was a little colony of it growing in the same place near our house each year.  I'm not sure if it was perenniel or annual.   My mother frequently made a tea from it, which was a very pleasant drink.  We also crushed freshley gathered plant tops and smeared them all over our bodies and clothes when we started on a walk into the woods.  It did have a distinctive and nice minty smell.  The purpose of this was to repel chiggers, and it seemed to work!
                   
                  Betty
                  Boerne
                   


                  To: npsot-npat@yahoogro ups.com
                  From: deangarrett@ hotmail.com
                  Date: Fri, 18 Sep 2009 19:54:20 +0000
                  Subject: RE: [NPSOT-NPAT] Hedeoma acinoides

                   
                  I assume that Delena Tull, author of Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest, has at least tried it as a tea, because she writes:

                  "The small sweet-scented hedeomas provide delightful teas that I consider among the best wild teas in the state. Use both the leaves and the flowers of these mints to produce a lemony or minty-flavored infusion."

                  She also notes that species Hedeoma pulegioides (not native to Texas) has been used as an abortifacient and that any species also repels insects, as many minty-spelling plants will.

                  So at least infusions appear to be safe. Don't know about dried parts, though.

                  > To: NPSOT-NPAT@yahoogro ups.com
                  > From: serendipity@ austin.rr. com
                  > Date: Fri, 18 Sep 2009 10:38:39 +0000
                  > Subject: [NPSOT-NPAT] Hedeoma acinoides
                  >
                  > Hedeoma acinoides (known also as annual pennyroyal, mock pennyroyal, and slender false pennyroyal) has a wonderful lemon scent; in fact the epithet acinoides means "like akinos," which was an aromatic herb known to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Does anyone know if it is safe to use our native species as a seasoning for food? Have any of you tried it and lived to tell the tale?
                  >
                  > (By the way, although this is supposed to be a spring-blooming plant, I found bunches of it flowering away in the Great Hills section of Austin yesterday).
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                  >
                  > Here are some addresses that will help you with your membership.
                  >
                  > Write to the list NPSOT-NPAT@yahoogro ups.com
                  > Write to the Owners NPSOT-NPAT-Owner@ yahoogroups. com
                  > Subscribe NPSOT-NPAT-Subscrib e@yahoogroups. com
                  > UnSubscribe NPSOT-NPAT-unsubscr ibe@yahoogroups. com
                  >
                  > Going on vacation? You can change your delivery with a blank E-Mail to:
                  >
                  > No Mail NPSOT-NPAT-NoMail@ yahoogroups. com
                  > Receive Mail NPSOT-NPAT-Normal@ yahoogroups. com
                  > Receive the digest NPSOT-NPAT-Digest@ yahoogroups. com Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  > <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
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                  > <*> Your email settings:
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