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Have I found the elusive SULPHUR SHELF?!!!

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  • Frank
    Someone PLEASE check the Mushroom ID folder under Photos (on the left side of the screen) and tell me what you think. This is supposed to be foolproof but I
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 3, 2007
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      Someone PLEASE check the "Mushroom ID" folder under Photos (on the
      left side of the screen) and tell me what you think. This is supposed
      to be foolproof but I am quite a fool. It was growing on a log
      completely bare of bark but there were no pines in the area and it is
      most likely a maple or oak log. When I cut it it started dripping a LOT.
      What's the best way to preserve them if they are indeed chicken mushrooms?

      Will they grow back in the same spot till the log is totally gone?
      Will they fruit again this year or just once?

      I've been looking for this for weeks!!! I hope my excitement isn't
      clouding my judgment!
    • Carol Raine
      Yes, It s sulfur shelf. You are lucky to find them so late in the season, they are really summer mushrooms. You should have started looking for them in June.
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 3, 2007
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        Yes, It's sulfur shelf. You are lucky to find them so late in the season, they are really summer mushrooms. You should have started looking for them in June. The edges are the best part. The bases can be woody. I believe they are one of the few, if not the only mushroom you can freeze raw. I will be in North Carolina this weekend and will miss the Cheesequake foray. Hope everyone has a good time. Carol
      • Jim Barg
        You got one, Frank...good find, especially in this dry weather. I ve found them as early as morel season, and as late as mid-October. I m sure there s some
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 3, 2007
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          You got one, Frank...good find, especially in this dry weather.

          I've found them as early as morel season, and as late as mid-October. I'm sure there's some
          disagreement on their "season", but this is "the real deal", Laetiporus sulphureus.

          One small caution... specimens of this mushroom, if found on Hemlock, have been reported
          to cause a reaction in some people...if you are uncertain about the wood you found it on
          (hardwood vs. hemlock), cook up a small piece and sample it, then wait for a day to see if
          you have any reaction. (Don't worry, if you react, it won't be horrible, just somewhat
          unpleasant on your digestive tract. Just remember, the word of caution: DO NOT do this with
          ANY other mushroom!) But, here in NJ, there haven't been too many reports of reactions with
          this one...it's considered one of the Foolproof Four.

          Carol is correct...the edges are the best part. Take your knife perpendicular to the edge, then
          cut inward toward the "stem" until you feel some resistance. That's the point where the
          edible part stops. Anything closer to the stem end will most likely be chalky or woody.

          Enjoy!
        • Jim Barg
          Oh, and by the way, SOMETIMES they come back in the same spot at other times of the year...keep an eye on that log!
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 3, 2007
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            Oh, and by the way, SOMETIMES they come back in the same spot at other times of the
            year...keep an eye on that log!
          • Frank
            Woohoo! Thanks folks! There was no Hemlock or any other conifer for that matter as far as the eye could see but I m making it a habit to only eat 2 tablespoons
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 4, 2007
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              Woohoo! Thanks folks! There was no Hemlock or any other conifer for
              that matter as far as the eye could see but I'm making it a habit to
              only eat 2 tablespoons or so of mushrooms the first time I try them.
              The log looked like it had little ones starting in 2 other spots so
              I'll be sure to check it again if we have some rain.
              Next on the checklist is grifola, the hen of the woods, if I'm correct
              we should see some this time of year if we get any rain?
              I've spent countless hours in the woods hunting (deer) the last month
              and let me tell you the woods are mycologically DEAD right now (save
              the treasure I found yesterday).
            • Jim Barg
              I just found a small fresh Grifola frondosa on a moist tree stump. Actually, we had a flush of Grifola frondosa back toward the beginning of September (which
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 6, 2007
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                I just found a small fresh Grifola frondosa on a moist tree stump. Actually, we had a flush of
                Grifola frondosa back toward the beginning of September (which actually was early for them).
                I'm thinking that the trees that didn't fruit MAY if we get some rain and the daytime
                temperatures don't nosedive into the 40's. But, your guess is good as mine! Let's hope for
                RAIN!

                As for the woods being mycologically dead...well, out here near Delaware Water Gap, it's
                been dry for three weeks, but I'm still finding things in isolated pockets. Among the
                mushrooms I've found: Coprinus comatus (Shaggy Mane) and Agaricus augustus (The Prince).
                I haven't found many, but a few are poking here and there.

                Good luck!
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