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Re: Possible Armillaria caligata and possibel Bay Bolete

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  • JimBarg
    It s hard to judge the color of the pores on the bolete from your photo, but my suspicion would be either Boletus badius or a Tylopilus species, but if the
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 29, 2011
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      It's hard to judge the color of the pores on the bolete from your photo, but my suspicion would be either Boletus badius or a Tylopilus species, but if the pores were yellow bruising blue, I'd lean toward the Boletus.

      I left a comment on one of the "Armillaria" photos. I'm fairly sure that it's Tricholoma (used to be Armillaria) caligatum. If they have a cinnamon-like odor, I'd feel even more confident of that ID. It's listed in many field guides as edible, but in my experience, it's been very bitter. Be extra careful with anything Armillaria or Tricholoma! Personally, I wouldn't eat any of them (except for nice fresh unopened caps of A. mellea).

      --- In NJMYCO@yahoogroups.com, "Liz Broderick" <medhead72@...> wrote:
      >
      > I found these beauties today. The suspected Armillaria was under a white oak in a mixed pine-oak woods. It had an interesting veil; the top being white and thick but there seemed to be a cottony veil on the unopened button underneath the main veil. The spore print was white, and the cap looked like it was covered with dark brown fibrils.
      >
      > The dark velvety bolete was under white pine with white pores at first turning yellowish on the older specimen. The pores and flesh near the pores bruised slightly blue, but that vanished quickly. It hasn't dropped a spore print yet.
      >
      > Here is the attached link.
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NJMYCO/photos/album/2049287920/pic/883583409/view?
      >
    • Liz
      Thanks Jim!
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 30, 2011
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        Thanks Jim!

        JimBarg <jimbarg@...> wrote:

        >It's hard to judge the color of the pores on the bolete from your photo, but my suspicion would be either Boletus badius or a Tylopilus species, but if the pores were yellow bruising blue, I'd lean toward the Boletus.
        >
        >I left a comment on one of the "Armillaria" photos. I'm fairly sure that it's Tricholoma (used to be Armillaria) caligatum. If they have a cinnamon-like odor, I'd feel even more confident of that ID. It's listed in many field guides as edible, but in my experience, it's been very bitter. Be extra careful with anything Armillaria or Tricholoma! Personally, I wouldn't eat any of them (except for nice fresh unopened caps of A. mellea).
        >
        >--- In NJMYCO@yahoogroups.com, "Liz Broderick" <medhead72@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> I found these beauties today. The suspected Armillaria was under a white oak in a mixed pine-oak woods. It had an interesting veil; the top being white and thick but there seemed to be a cottony veil on the unopened button underneath the main veil. The spore print was white, and the cap looked like it was covered with dark brown fibrils.
        >>
        >> The dark velvety bolete was under white pine with white pores at first turning yellowish on the older specimen. The pores and flesh near the pores bruised slightly blue, but that vanished quickly. It hasn't dropped a spore print yet.
        >>
        >> Here is the attached link.
        >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NJMYCO/photos/album/2049287920/pic/883583409/view?
        >>
        >
        >
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