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Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Re: Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple

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  • Cornelius Hamelberg
    Lavonda Staples, That kind of home work was done a long time ago and you should assume that that and alot more is a part of my own natural background when we
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 1, 2010
      Lavonda Staples,

      That kind of home work was done a long time ago and you should assume that that and alot more is a part of my own natural background when we talk about any aspect of the slave trade or  even contemporary race politics.

      http://www.google.com/search?q=+++%09+New+Black+Panther+Party+Hosts+National+Black+Power+Convention+This+Weekend+In+Atlanta%2C+Georgia.+Black+Leaders+at+Morris+Brown+College+&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:sv-SE:official&client=firefox-a




      On 31 May 2010 19:34, Lavonda Staples <lrstaples@...> wrote:
      One more thing.  Mr. Hamelburg, please study the histories of Diasporans.  I'm giving you a list of homework.
       
      1.  The people of color and the "blacks" of Ayiti (Haiti) - this division exists to this very day
      2.  The free people of color, the "blacks", and the enslaved persons of Louisiana.  How the self-hatred culminated into the Massacre of July 4, 1866.
      3.  Divisions between house slaves and field hands between 1787 (I pick this date because of the Second Continental Congress of the United States of America.  At this point, slavery is the FEDERAL law of the land) and April 1861 (firing on Fort Sumter, SC). 
      4.  Historic beginnings of fraternities and sororities in Black America.  These divisions continued until roughly the rise of Martin Luther King, Jr. - who was admittedly one of the "firsts" for non-light skinned African Americans in terms of rising to national prominence (along with Medgar Evers, Jr.)
      5.  Creation of products deleterious to health which have been sold and marketed in Black communites.  In example, the use of hydroquinone to lighten skin and the use of hair relaxers (which have the same base ingredient as Drain-O). 
      6.  The "marketing" of Martin Luther King, Jr. as an acceptable icon and the concurrent lack of knowlege regarding the conversion of Malcolm X to "true" Islam.  His time in the Nation of Islam (NOI) is ALWAYS the focal point for western media because (in my opinion) this serves to galvanize primarily Christian Black American against true Islam.  To go further, this deepens the fears against Islam by only providing two stories (1) Muslim terrorist and (2) Fanatic brother on the corner selling bean pies and possibly being the male counterpart in a polygamous marriage. 
       
      Is that good enough for you?  Intra-racial hatred based on two factors:
      • Skin Color (phenotypical difference)
      • Religion
       
      These aggregate sins mount into the untenable outcomes of ignorance and fear. 
       
      NOW!  I can go and walk.  
       
      La Vonda R. Staples
       
       
      On Mon, May 31, 2010 at 10:57 AM, Abdul Karim Bangura <theai@...> wrote:
       
      Mr. Cornelius Hamelberg,
       
      I am not sure what your point is in this rejoinder. But one thing I could tease out of it is an attempt to link Islam and slavery. If at all this is your goal, then you got it all wrong.
       
      Great minds who have written on slavery in the Mediterranean lands of Islam (e.g., A. Adu Boahen, Edward Wilmot Blyden, Bernard Lewis, Abdel Kader Zabadia, Khair El-Din Haseeb, Muhammad al-Hadi al-Juwayli, Y. F. Hasan, John Hunwick, Eve Powell), Afrikan, Arab and Western Christians and Muslims writing in English, French and Arabic, all reach the same conclusions. The following are just a few:
       
      (a) Islam did not invent slavery and had to struggle against it. The practice of slavery was a fundamental social assumption of Arab society before the rise of Islam and of the various Mediterranean societies in which Islamic culture developed and achieved its overarching characteristics in the medieval period. Early Muslims were persecuted for challenging the practice.
       
      (b) Islam's stand on slavery hinged upon the Qur'anic verses which make it very clear that the revelations in the Torah, the Bible and the Qur'an came to lead people out of the darkness of idolatry, injustice, violence, and humiliation and enslavement of the other, to the light of truth, justice, righteousness, self-esteem and nobility (too numerous to quote here). It suffices to say that the goal Islam followed encompassed a threefold path: (1) reducing the avenues to enslavement and closing them; (2) caring for the slave and perfecting him; (3) opening wide the gates to freedom for the slave.
       
      (c) Yes, slavery is slavery and cannot be beautified by cosmetics. The forceful seizure of human beings and their total subjection to the will of other human beings, and the humiliation and degradation involved in the process, cannot be portrayed in positive terms. Yet, the comparison (rather than "contrast") with other systems of slavery, and particularly slavery in the New World, is not only inevitable, but is essential for a global understanding of the Afrikan Diaslora. That "the Arabs were humane and familial in their treatment of their slaves" is indisputable. It is a question that challenges us to explore the social and economic realities of enslaved and also freed Afrikans in the greater Islamic world. Thus, we must be careful in our analyses not to import assumptions based on other systems of slavery, whether transatlantic or otherwise, just as we must not be led astray by theories about the nature of Islamic societies.
       
      (d) Transatlantic slavery branded one subhuman from the cradle to the grave. Mediterranean slavery, on the other hand, like slavery in Afrika, provided opportunities for a slave to be free and even become part of the nobility. Examples of this are prevalent in the royal families even to this day (Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, etc.).
       
      In essence, slavery in the Mediterranean was not the making of Islam; in fact, it was contrary to Islam. And many a Muslim died fighting against the practice.
       
      In Peace Always,
      Abdul Karim Bangura/.
       
       
       
       
       

      It's not as if anyone has to be learned or to delve into linguistic evidence or to have taken a five minute lesson from a Muslim Prayer leader/ Imam or to have studied for many years under the tutelage of “revered rabbis” to confirm that there have been contacts between Africa and the Arab Civilisation or that Aba Abraham came from the area known as Mesoptamia. There was certainly trade contacts between Africa and Arabia, even the lucrative slave-trade by which means Bilal, Islam's first muezzin arrived in Mecca, qiblah of Holy Land of Islam – and it was Abu Bakr al-Siddiq who freed him from slavery.. As Chancellor Williams says in his " The Destruction of Black Civilization", the black man arrived in America in large numbers in the same way that he arrived in the Hijaz (the Arabian Peninsular) : through slavery. Indeed, Moses the greatest Prophet of Israel was born in Africa, in Egypt more than a hundred and twenty years after Joseph had been sold into slavery to some Arab slave traders ( Ishmaelites) who eventually sold him to Egyptians - as the Holy Bible tells us in Genesis 36: 25-30 ( “King James version”) :

      “25 And they sat down to eat bread: and they lifted up their eyes and looked, and, behold, a company of Ishmeelites came from Gilead with their camels bearing spicery and balm and myrrh, going to carry [it] down to Egypt. 26 And Judah said unto his brethren, What profit [is it] if we slay our brother, and conceal his blood? 27 Come, and let us sell him to the Ishmaelites, and let not our hand be upon him; for he [is] our brother [and] our flesh. And his brethren were content. 28 Then there passed by Midianites merchantmen; and they drew and lifted up Joseph out of the pit, and sold Joseph to the Ishmaelites for twenty [pieces] of silver: and they brought Joseph into Egypt. 29 And Reuben returned unto the pit; and, behold, Joseph [was] not in the pit; and he rent his clothes. 30 And he returned unto his brethren, and said, The child [is] not; and I, whither shall I go?”

      http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Chancellor+Williams+%22+The+Destruction+of+Black+Civilization%22&btnG=Search&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=

       
       
       
      On 30 May 2010 17:04, Abdul Karim Bangura <theai@...> wrote:
       
      Addendum:
       
      Add to the list the folio size 376 tome titled The Meanings of Timbuktu edited by Shamil Jeppie and Souleymane Bachir Diagne jointly published by CODESRIA in Dakar, Senegal and HSRC in Johannesburg, South Africa. It is the first of many works commissioned by former President Thabo Mbeki who financed and launched the Tombouctou Manuscript Project at the University of Cape Town in August of 2005 after his visit to Timbuktu, bypassing the hotels and other amenities and living just like any other average inhabitant of the area for an entire week.
       
       
      Yes, you are mistaken, Nnanna. Read Edward Hall's famous work on High Context and Low Context Culture, and you will realize that Afrikan and Arab cultures are much more similar compared to the others. If you also read Nicholas Faraclas' chapter, "They Came Before the Egyptians: Linguistic Evidence for the African Roots of Semitic Languages," in Silvia Federici's edited book, Enduring Western Civilization, you will also learn a great deal about why the two cultures are so much related. Another great read is John Hunwick and Eve Troutt Powell's book, The African Diaspora in the Mediterranean Lands of Islam.
       
      Besides, if you read the Torah, the Bible and the Qur'an to piece together the connections among Prophet Abraham/Ibrahim (PBUH), Hagar/Hajjar (APWH) and Prophet Ishmael/Isma'il (PBUH), you will know that Prophet Muhammad's (PBUH) roots are partly Afrikan and his first Muezzin that went on top of the Ka'aba to render the first Adhan/Call to Prayer, Bilal ibn Rabah, was Afrikan.
       
      In Peace Always,
      Abdul Karim Bangura/.
      Bona Fides for my claim: A Muslim, who served as an Altar Boy during his youth and studied Judaism under revered Rabbis, and has written and lectured extensively across the globe on the Abrahamic connections and Peace, and has copies of the Torah, the Bible, the Qur'an, and the Hadith at his home and office and reads them religiously. His recent work on the Abrahamic connections is titled "Parable of the Three Rings:  An Intercultural and Philosophical Nexus among Judaism, Christianity and Islam" presented as a Plenary Address at the International Conference on Intercultural Philosophy organized by the Department of Classics and Philosophy at the University of Cape Coast in Ghana in conjunction with the Council for Research in Values and Philosophy (CRVP), Washington, USA, convened  from Wednesday 3rd to Friday 5th February, 2010 at the Sasakawa Conference Centre, UCC. The paper will appear as a chapter in a book being edited and published by the CRVP.
       
       
       
       
       "It is time for Africa and the Arab world to form a joint front against the anti-family
      values propagated by the Western World."
                                                       -  Otitigbe
       
      Why invite the Arab world?
      I doubt they have the same family values as Africans, or am I mistaken?
      Nnanna
       
       
       

      From: Dr. Valentine Ojo <valojo@...>
      To: USAAfricaDialogue <USAAfricaDialogue@...>
      Cc: nowa_o@...; otitigbe@...; Kwabena Akurang-Parry <KAParr@...>; Ola Kassim <OlaKassimMD@...>; Adeniran Adeboye <aadeboye@...>; Abraham Madu <abraham.madu@...>; Adeniba Adepoyigi <adenibaadepoyigi@...>; Bimbola Adelakun <adunnibabe@...>; Tony Agbali <attahagbl@...>; Emmanuel Babatunde <babemman2000@...>; Cornelius Hamelberg <corneliushamelberg@...>; Gloria (History) Emeagwali <emeagwali@...>; Ede Amatorisero <esulaalu@...>; Farooq Kperogi <farooqkperogi@...>; Ibukunolu Babajide <ibk@...>; Joe Igietseme <jbi8@...>; Lavonda Staples <lrstaples@...>; Nnanna Agomoh <mnagomoh@...>; Odidere Afis <odidere2001@...>; Omo Oba <oladokun@...>; Pamela Smith <pamelasmith@...>; Pius Adesanmi <piusadesanmi@...>; Dominic Ogbonna <summadom@...>; Abdul Bangura <theai@...>; Dele Olawole <theoracle@...>; Joe Attueyi <topcrestt@...>; Toyin Adepoju <toyin.adepoju@...>; Toyin Falola <toyin.falola@...>
      Sent: Sun, May 30, 2010 1:23:17 AM
      Subject: RE: Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple
       
      "...one political lesson of all of this is that it is difficult to assert cultural and religious independence when one is economically dependent." - Nowa Omoigui nowa_o@...
       
      And of course, USAAfrica Dialogue will not dare post the views of dissenting Africans!
       
      Africans are not allowed to have views different from the West in anything.
       
      If you do, you are deemed backward, barbaric, primitive - and now - homophobic!
       
      Great!
       
      Dr. Valentine Ojo
      Tall Timbers, MD
       
       
       
      On Sun 05/30/10 12:49 AM , Nowa Omoigui nowa_o@... sent:
       
       

       

      Dear SAN/Otitigbe

       
      I feel your dismay at the way things have turned out.
       
      Irrespective of the merits/specifics of this particular matter, one political lesson of all of this is that it is difficult to assert cultural and religious independence when one is economically dependent.  As the article itself observes:
        
      "......The nation, one of the poorest in Africa, is heavily dependent on foreign aid, and several donors suggested they might have to reconsider their generosity......" In other words, African culture (and values) are for sale. As long as your behavior is accepted in the West you can flout your country's laws and customs with impunity. Here this: “The secretary general told the president rather strongly that the current controversy was having a negative effect on Malawi’s reputation and obscuring the progress it had made in other spheres,” .... (ie damn the laws of the country)
        
      Funny enough, as negatively as many traditional AFricans view acts like felatio, cunnilingus, etc.. they are accepted culture in the western world and no one is anywhere near considering them immoral or illegal on an international level just because conservative AFricans take a dim view of them. 
       
      But if it was the reverse you can bet your last naira that banning felatio/cunnilingus etc.. would have been tied to foreign aid and most likely added to the Child Rights Act, law against circumcision, etc..  Meanwhile there are even government programs in the UK that teach 14 year old girls and boys how to perform oral sex as an option. But that is not child abuse.
        
      Consensual homosexuality is illegal in about 70 countries. However in the US, homosexuality was upheld by the Supreme Court in Lawrence v Texas http://www.law.duke.edu/publiclaw/supremecourtonline/commentary/lawvtex
       
      On that basis, the US (and like minded jurisdictions) go around the world imposing their values. But they will never tolerate the reverse.
        
      I siddon look. Where all of this will end culturally is unclear.
        
      NAO
       
      --- On Sat, 5/29/10, Otitigbe <otitigbe@...> wrote:
       
      From: Otitigbe <otitigbe@...>
      Subject: Re: [NaijaPolitics] Re: [Edo-Nation] Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple
      Date: Saturday, May 29, 2010, 9:47 PM
       
      It is time for Africa and the Arab world to form a joint front against the anti-family values propagated by the Western World.

      Otitigbe.

        
       
      From: charles Edosomwan
      Sent: Saturday, May 29, 2010 9:46 PM
      To: Edo Nation ; defsec@egroups.com ; Naijapolitics ; Edo Ciao ; Cameroon Net
      Subject: [NaijaPolitics] Re: [Edo-Nation] Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple
       
         
       
      Nowa,
      When I was just beginning to like the place, Malawi just lost its attraction to me.
      CUE
      Sent from my BlackBerry wireless device from MTN
       
      From: Nowa Omoigui
      Date: Sat, 29 May 2010 17:07:08 -0700 (PDT)
      To:
      Subject: [Edo-Nation] Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple
       
         
       
      May 29, 2010
       
      Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple
       
      By BARRY BEARAK
       
      NYTimes
       
      JOHANNESBURG — A gay couple in Malawi sentenced to 14 years in prison for “unnatural acts” was pardoned Saturday shortly after Secretary General Ban Ki-moon of the United Nations met with that country’s president.
       
      “These boys committed a crime against our culture, our religion and our laws,” President Bingu wa Mutharika said at a news conference in Lilongwe, the capital, before adding that he nevertheless was ordering the couple’s unconditional release on “humanitarian grounds.”
       
      The two men, Tiwonge Chimbalanga, 33, and Steven Monjeza, 26, were arrested Dec. 28, two days after holding an engagement party in Blantyre, the nation’s largest city. As a rule, gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgender people do not dare make any public show of affection in their deeply conservative country. The event made front-page headlines in a Malawian newspaper.
       
      On May 18, the couple was convicted of sodomy, and while the harsh sentence was generally welcomed by the Malawian public, it drew international rebuke. The nation, one of the poorest in Africa, is heavily dependent on foreign aid, and several donors suggested they might have to reconsider their generosity.
       
      Pop stars issued their own condemnations. Madonna, who has adopted two children from Malawi, said the nation had taken “a giant step backward.” Elton John wrote an appeal to Mr. Mutharika, asking him to release the couple and “expunge Malawi’s discriminatory laws against homosexuality.”
       
      In announcing the pardon, the president emphasized that he was not condoning gay marriage. “It’s unheard of in Malawi, and it’s illegal,” he said.
       
      Mr. Mutharika, an economist and the chairman of the African Union, is often praised for recent improvements in Malawi’s health and education systems. Mr. Ban arrived Saturday to begin a two-day visit.
       
      “The secretary general told the president rather strongly that the current controversy was having a negative effect on Malawi’s reputation and obscuring the progress it had made in other spheres,” said a member of the United Nations delegation who said he was not authorized to comment and could only speak anonymously.
       
      Mr. Ban then addressed Parliament, informing legislators that their president had made a “courageous decision” to grant the pardon. The legislators responded with dreary silence while foreign diplomats in the gallery above cheered and applauded.
       
      The secretary general further told the lawmakers, “It is unfortunate that laws that criminalize people on the basis of their sexual orientation should still exist in some countries.”
       
      A White House spokesman, Robert Gibbs, greeted news of the pardon with approval, declaring that “these individuals were not criminals and their struggle is not unique.”
       
      Late Saturday, Mr. Chimbalanga, who has said he considers himself a woman in a man’s body, and Mr. Monjeza were released from custody.
       
      The police escorted Mr. Chimbalanga back to his home village in the remote hills of Thyolo District. He stayed for a reunion with family members, and planned to return to Blantyre early Sunday.
       
      “I’ve been under so much emotional stress that I need to find somewhere to rest,” said Mr. Chimbalanga, speaking by cellphone through an interpreter. “I still want to marry Steven. But I don’t know what he is thinking any more. We’ve been through so much.”
       
      He said: “I think it is going to be hard to stay in Malawi. I am afraid of what people might do to us. We probably need to seek asylum in some other country. Is there a place for us? I don’t know.”
       
      Celia W. Dugger contributed reporting.
       
       
       
       
       
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    • Cornelius Hamelberg
      Who doesn t? Do you have any idea why I get this message from USA-Africa- Dialogue each time I post: Sorry... The owner of this group has banned you from this
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 2, 2010
        Who doesn't?

        Do you have any idea why I get this message from USA-Africa- Dialogue each time I post:

        "Sorry...

        The owner of this group has banned you from this group."

        I just hope that someone hasn't hijacked my computer and sent some e-mails from my web address, purporting that such mails were written by me. I say this because there was something funny about my last two replies to USA - Dialogue: the whole thread moved from my in box to sent items. Usually sent items are in the sent items box and the thread remains in my inbox......

         In the meantime  there was a long discussion on pidgin English and Nigerian English. I waited and waited but somehow this or any reference to this simply did not show up:

        http://books.google.com/books?id=mZUuEjLQyNcC&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+Power+of+African+Cultures&source=bl&ots=zu-H4NuvWh&sig=1KzDSCuYTuqUcFCXhB6t_E3IsKc&hl=en&ei=T4oGTI2uM4KYOOWi8MAL&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDQQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false





        On 1 June 2010 15:29, Lavonda Staples <lrstaples@...> wrote:
        You obvoiusly need a tune-up.  You are acting brand new.
         


         
        On Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 2:35 AM, Cornelius Hamelberg <corneliushamelberg@...> wrote:
        Lavonda Staples,

        That kind of home work was done a long time ago and you should assume that that and alot more is a part of my own natural background when we talk about any aspect of the slave trade or  even contemporary race politics.

        http://www.google.com/search?q=+++%09+New+Black+Panther+Party+Hosts+National+Black+Power+Convention+This+Weekend+In+Atlanta%2C+Georgia.+Black+Leaders+at+Morris+Brown+College+&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:sv-SE:official&client=firefox-a




        On 31 May 2010 19:34, Lavonda Staples <lrstaples@...> wrote:
        One more thing.  Mr. Hamelburg, please study the histories of Diasporans.  I'm giving you a list of homework.
         
        1.  The people of color and the "blacks" of Ayiti (Haiti) - this division exists to this very day
        2.  The free people of color, the "blacks", and the enslaved persons of Louisiana.  How the self-hatred culminated into the Massacre of July 4, 1866.
        3.  Divisions between house slaves and field hands between 1787 (I pick this date because of the Second Continental Congress of the United States of America.  At this point, slavery is the FEDERAL law of the land) and April 1861 (firing on Fort Sumter, SC). 
        4.  Historic beginnings of fraternities and sororities in Black America.  These divisions continued until roughly the rise of Martin Luther King, Jr. - who was admittedly one of the "firsts" for non-light skinned African Americans in terms of rising to national prominence (along with Medgar Evers, Jr.)
        5.  Creation of products deleterious to health which have been sold and marketed in Black communites.  In example, the use of hydroquinone to lighten skin and the use of hair relaxers (which have the same base ingredient as Drain-O). 
        6.  The "marketing" of Martin Luther King, Jr. as an acceptable icon and the concurrent lack of knowlege regarding the conversion of Malcolm X to "true" Islam.  His time in the Nation of Islam (NOI) is ALWAYS the focal point for western media because (in my opinion) this serves to galvanize primarily Christian Black American against true Islam.  To go further, this deepens the fears against Islam by only providing two stories (1) Muslim terrorist and (2) Fanatic brother on the corner selling bean pies and possibly being the male counterpart in a polygamous marriage. 
         
        Is that good enough for you?  Intra-racial hatred based on two factors:
        • Skin Color (phenotypical difference)
        • Religion
         
        These aggregate sins mount into the untenable outcomes of ignorance and fear. 
         
        NOW!  I can go and walk.  
         
        La Vonda R. Staples
         
         
        On Mon, May 31, 2010 at 10:57 AM, Abdul Karim Bangura <theai@...> wrote:
         
        Mr. Cornelius Hamelberg,
         
        I am not sure what your point is in this rejoinder. But one thing I could tease out of it is an attempt to link Islam and slavery. If at all this is your goal, then you got it all wrong.
         
        Great minds who have written on slavery in the Mediterranean lands of Islam (e.g., A. Adu Boahen, Edward Wilmot Blyden, Bernard Lewis, Abdel Kader Zabadia, Khair El-Din Haseeb, Muhammad al-Hadi al-Juwayli, Y. F. Hasan, John Hunwick, Eve Powell), Afrikan, Arab and Western Christians and Muslims writing in English, French and Arabic, all reach the same conclusions. The following are just a few:
         
        (a) Islam did not invent slavery and had to struggle against it. The practice of slavery was a fundamental social assumption of Arab society before the rise of Islam and of the various Mediterranean societies in which Islamic culture developed and achieved its overarching characteristics in the medieval period. Early Muslims were persecuted for challenging the practice.
         
        (b) Islam's stand on slavery hinged upon the Qur'anic verses which make it very clear that the revelations in the Torah, the Bible and the Qur'an came to lead people out of the darkness of idolatry, injustice, violence, and humiliation and enslavement of the other, to the light of truth, justice, righteousness, self-esteem and nobility (too numerous to quote here). It suffices to say that the goal Islam followed encompassed a threefold path: (1) reducing the avenues to enslavement and closing them; (2) caring for the slave and perfecting him; (3) opening wide the gates to freedom for the slave.
         
        (c) Yes, slavery is slavery and cannot be beautified by cosmetics. The forceful seizure of human beings and their total subjection to the will of other human beings, and the humiliation and degradation involved in the process, cannot be portrayed in positive terms. Yet, the comparison (rather than "contrast") with other systems of slavery, and particularly slavery in the New World, is not only inevitable, but is essential for a global understanding of the Afrikan Diaslora. That "the Arabs were humane and familial in their treatment of their slaves" is indisputable. It is a question that challenges us to explore the social and economic realities of enslaved and also freed Afrikans in the greater Islamic world. Thus, we must be careful in our analyses not to import assumptions based on other systems of slavery, whether transatlantic or otherwise, just as we must not be led astray by theories about the nature of Islamic societies.
         
        (d) Transatlantic slavery branded one subhuman from the cradle to the grave. Mediterranean slavery, on the other hand, like slavery in Afrika, provided opportunities for a slave to be free and even become part of the nobility. Examples of this are prevalent in the royal families even to this day (Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, etc.).
         
        In essence, slavery in the Mediterranean was not the making of Islam; in fact, it was contrary to Islam. And many a Muslim died fighting against the practice.
         
        In Peace Always,
        Abdul Karim Bangura/.
         
         
         
         
         

        It's not as if anyone has to be learned or to delve into linguistic evidence or to have taken a five minute lesson from a Muslim Prayer leader/ Imam or to have studied for many years under the tutelage of “revered rabbis” to confirm that there have been contacts between Africa and the Arab Civilisation or that Aba Abraham came from the area known as Mesoptamia. There was certainly trade contacts between Africa and Arabia, even the lucrative slave-trade by which means Bilal, Islam's first muezzin arrived in Mecca, qiblah of Holy Land of Islam – and it was Abu Bakr al-Siddiq who freed him from slavery.. As Chancellor Williams says in his " The Destruction of Black Civilization", the black man arrived in America in large numbers in the same way that he arrived in the Hijaz (the Arabian Peninsular) : through slavery. Indeed, Moses the greatest Prophet of Israel was born in Africa, in Egypt more than a hundred and twenty years after Joseph had been sold into slavery to some Arab slave traders ( Ishmaelites) who eventually sold him to Egyptians - as the Holy Bible tells us in Genesis 36: 25-30 ( “King James version”) :

        “25 And they sat down to eat bread: and they lifted up their eyes and looked, and, behold, a company of Ishmeelites came from Gilead with their camels bearing spicery and balm and myrrh, going to carry [it] down to Egypt. 26 And Judah said unto his brethren, What profit [is it] if we slay our brother, and conceal his blood? 27 Come, and let us sell him to the Ishmaelites, and let not our hand be upon him; for he [is] our brother [and] our flesh. And his brethren were content. 28 Then there passed by Midianites merchantmen; and they drew and lifted up Joseph out of the pit, and sold Joseph to the Ishmaelites for twenty [pieces] of silver: and they brought Joseph into Egypt. 29 And Reuben returned unto the pit; and, behold, Joseph [was] not in the pit; and he rent his clothes. 30 And he returned unto his brethren, and said, The child [is] not; and I, whither shall I go?”

        http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Chancellor+Williams+%22+The+Destruction+of+Black+Civilization%22&btnG=Search&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=

         
         
         
        On 30 May 2010 17:04, Abdul Karim Bangura <theai@...> wrote:
         
        Addendum:
         
        Add to the list the folio size 376 tome titled The Meanings of Timbuktu edited by Shamil Jeppie and Souleymane Bachir Diagne jointly published by CODESRIA in Dakar, Senegal and HSRC in Johannesburg, South Africa. It is the first of many works commissioned by former President Thabo Mbeki who financed and launched the Tombouctou Manuscript Project at the University of Cape Town in August of 2005 after his visit to Timbuktu, bypassing the hotels and other amenities and living just like any other average inhabitant of the area for an entire week.
         
         
        Yes, you are mistaken, Nnanna. Read Edward Hall's famous work on High Context and Low Context Culture, and you will realize that Afrikan and Arab cultures are much more similar compared to the others. If you also read Nicholas Faraclas' chapter, "They Came Before the Egyptians: Linguistic Evidence for the African Roots of Semitic Languages," in Silvia Federici's edited book, Enduring Western Civilization, you will also learn a great deal about why the two cultures are so much related. Another great read is John Hunwick and Eve Troutt Powell's book, The African Diaspora in the Mediterranean Lands of Islam.
         
        Besides, if you read the Torah, the Bible and the Qur'an to piece together the connections among Prophet Abraham/Ibrahim (PBUH), Hagar/Hajjar (APWH) and Prophet Ishmael/Isma'il (PBUH), you will know that Prophet Muhammad's (PBUH) roots are partly Afrikan and his first Muezzin that went on top of the Ka'aba to render the first Adhan/Call to Prayer, Bilal ibn Rabah, was Afrikan.
         
        In Peace Always,
        Abdul Karim Bangura/.
        Bona Fides for my claim: A Muslim, who served as an Altar Boy during his youth and studied Judaism under revered Rabbis, and has written and lectured extensively across the globe on the Abrahamic connections and Peace, and has copies of the Torah, the Bible, the Qur'an, and the Hadith at his home and office and reads them religiously. His recent work on the Abrahamic connections is titled "Parable of the Three Rings:  An Intercultural and Philosophical Nexus among Judaism, Christianity and Islam" presented as a Plenary Address at the International Conference on Intercultural Philosophy organized by the Department of Classics and Philosophy at the University of Cape Coast in Ghana in conjunction with the Council for Research in Values and Philosophy (CRVP), Washington, USA, convened  from Wednesday 3rd to Friday 5th February, 2010 at the Sasakawa Conference Centre, UCC. The paper will appear as a chapter in a book being edited and published by the CRVP.
         
         
         
         
         "It is time for Africa and the Arab world to form a joint front against the anti-family
        values propagated by the Western World."
                                                         -  Otitigbe
         
        Why invite the Arab world?
        I doubt they have the same family values as Africans, or am I mistaken?
        Nnanna
         
         
         

        From: Dr. Valentine Ojo <valojo@...>
        To: USAAfricaDialogue <USAAfricaDialogue@...>
        Cc: nowa_o@...; otitigbe@...; Kwabena Akurang-Parry <KAParr@...>; Ola Kassim <OlaKassimMD@...>; Adeniran Adeboye <aadeboye@...>; Abraham Madu <abraham.madu@...>; Adeniba Adepoyigi <adenibaadepoyigi@...>; Bimbola Adelakun <adunnibabe@...>; Tony Agbali <attahagbl@...>; Emmanuel Babatunde <babemman2000@...>; Cornelius Hamelberg <corneliushamelberg@...>; Gloria (History) Emeagwali <emeagwali@...>; Ede Amatorisero <esulaalu@...>; Farooq Kperogi <farooqkperogi@...>; Ibukunolu Babajide <ibk@...>; Joe Igietseme <jbi8@...>; Lavonda Staples <lrstaples@...>; Nnanna Agomoh <mnagomoh@...>; Odidere Afis <odidere2001@...>; Omo Oba <oladokun@...>; Pamela Smith <pamelasmith@...>; Pius Adesanmi <piusadesanmi@...>; Dominic Ogbonna <summadom@...>; Abdul Bangura <theai@...>; Dele Olawole <theoracle@...>; Joe Attueyi <topcrestt@...>; Toyin Adepoju <toyin.adepoju@...>; Toyin Falola <toyin.falola@...>
        Sent: Sun, May 30, 2010 1:23:17 AM
        Subject: RE: Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple
         
        "...one political lesson of all of this is that it is difficult to assert cultural and religious independence when one is economically dependent." - Nowa Omoigui nowa_o@...
         
        And of course, USAAfrica Dialogue will not dare post the views of dissenting Africans!
         
        Africans are not allowed to have views different from the West in anything.
         
        If you do, you are deemed backward, barbaric, primitive - and now - homophobic!
         
        Great!
         
        Dr. Valentine Ojo
        Tall Timbers, MD
         
         
         
        On Sun 05/30/10 12:49 AM , Nowa Omoigui nowa_o@... sent:
         
         

         

        Dear SAN/Otitigbe

         
        I feel your dismay at the way things have turned out.
         
        Irrespective of the merits/specifics of this particular matter, one political lesson of all of this is that it is difficult to assert cultural and religious independence when one is economically dependent.  As the article itself observes:
          
        "......The nation, one of the poorest in Africa, is heavily dependent on foreign aid, and several donors suggested they might have to reconsider their generosity......" In other words, African culture (and values) are for sale. As long as your behavior is accepted in the West you can flout your country's laws and customs with impunity. Here this: “The secretary general told the president rather strongly that the current controversy was having a negative effect on Malawi’s reputation and obscuring the progress it had made in other spheres,” .... (ie damn the laws of the country)
          
        Funny enough, as negatively as many traditional AFricans view acts like felatio, cunnilingus, etc.. they are accepted culture in the western world and no one is anywhere near considering them immoral or illegal on an international level just because conservative AFricans take a dim view of them. 
         
        But if it was the reverse you can bet your last naira that banning felatio/cunnilingus etc.. would have been tied to foreign aid and most likely added to the Child Rights Act, law against circumcision, etc..  Meanwhile there are even government programs in the UK that teach 14 year old girls and boys how to perform oral sex as an option. But that is not child abuse.
          
        Consensual homosexuality is illegal in about 70 countries. However in the US, homosexuality was upheld by the Supreme Court in Lawrence v Texas http://www.law.duke.edu/publiclaw/supremecourtonline/commentary/lawvtex
         
        On that basis, the US (and like minded jurisdictions) go around the world imposing their values. But they will never tolerate the reverse.
          
        I siddon look. Where all of this will end culturally is unclear.
          
        NAO
         
        --- On Sat, 5/29/10, Otitigbe <otitigbe@...> wrote:
         
        From: Otitigbe <otitigbe@...>
        Subject: Re: [NaijaPolitics] Re: [Edo-Nation] Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple
        Date: Saturday, May 29, 2010, 9:47 PM
         
        It is time for Africa and the Arab world to form a joint front against the anti-family values propagated by the Western World.

        Otitigbe.

          
         
        From: charles Edosomwan
        Sent: Saturday, May 29, 2010 9:46 PM
        To: Edo Nation ; defsec@egroups.com ; Naijapolitics ; Edo Ciao ; Cameroon Net
        Subject: [NaijaPolitics] Re: [Edo-Nation] Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple
         
           
         
        Nowa,
        When I was just beginning to like the place, Malawi just lost its attraction to me.
        CUE
        Sent from my BlackBerry wireless device from MTN
         
        From: Nowa Omoigui
        Date: Sat, 29 May 2010 17:07:08 -0700 (PDT)
        To:
        Subject: [Edo-Nation] Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple
         
           
         
        May 29, 2010
         
        Malawi President Pardons Gay Couple
         
        By BARRY BEARAK
         
        NYTimes
         
        JOHANNESBURG — A gay couple in Malawi sentenced to 14 years in prison for “unnatural acts” was pardoned Saturday shortly after Secretary General Ban Ki-moon of the United Nations met with that country’s president.
         
        “These boys committed a crime against our culture, our religion and our laws,” President Bingu wa Mutharika said at a news conference in Lilongwe, the capital, before adding that he nevertheless was ordering the couple’s unconditional release on “humanitarian grounds.”
         
        The two men, Tiwonge Chimbalanga, 33, and Steven Monjeza, 26, were arrested Dec. 28, two days after holding an engagement party in Blantyre, the nation’s largest city. As a rule, gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgender people do not dare make any public show of affection in their deeply conservative country. The event made front-page headlines in a Malawian newspaper.
         
        On May 18, the couple was convicted of sodomy, and while the harsh sentence was generally welcomed by the Malawian public, it drew international rebuke. The nation, one of the poorest in Africa, is heavily dependent on foreign aid, and several donors suggested they might have to reconsider their generosity.
         
        Pop stars issued their own condemnations. Madonna, who has adopted two children from Malawi, said the nation had taken “a giant step backward.” Elton John wrote an appeal to Mr. Mutharika, asking him to release the couple and “expunge Malawi’s discriminatory laws against homosexuality.”
         
        In announcing the pardon, the president emphasized that he was not condoning gay marriage. “It’s unheard of in Malawi, and it’s illegal,” he said.
         
        Mr. Mutharika, an economist and the chairman of the African Union, is often praised for recent improvements in Malawi’s health and education systems. Mr. Ban arrived Saturday to begin a two-day visit.
         
        “The secretary general told the president rather strongly that the current controversy was having a negative effect on Malawi’s reputation and obscuring the progress it had made in other spheres,” said a member of the United Nations delegation who said he was not authorized to comment and could only speak anonymously.
         
        Mr. Ban then addressed Parliament, informing legislators that their president had made a “courageous decision” to grant the pardon. The legislators responded with dreary silence while foreign diplomats in the gallery above cheered and applauded.
         
        The secretary general further told the lawmakers, “It is unfortunate that laws that criminalize people on the basis of their sexual orientation should still exist in some countries.”
         
        A White House spokesman, Robert Gibbs, greeted news of the pardon with approval, declaring that “these individuals were not criminals and their struggle is not unique.”
         
        Late Saturday, Mr. Chimbalanga, who has said he considers himself a woman in a man’s body, and Mr. Monjeza were released from custody.
         
        The police escorted Mr. Chimbalanga back to his home village in the remote hills of Thyolo District. He stayed for a reunion with family members, and planned to return to Blantyre early Sunday.
         
        “I’ve been under so much emotional stress that I need to find somewhere to rest,” said Mr. Chimbalanga, speaking by cellphone through an interpreter. “I still want to marry Steven. But I don’t know what he is thinking any more. We’ve been through so much.”
         
        He said: “I think it is going to be hard to stay in Malawi. I am afraid of what people might do to us. We probably need to seek asylum in some other country. Is there a place for us? I don’t know.”
         
        Celia W. Dugger contributed reporting.
         
         
         
         
         
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