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Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

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  • Valentine Ojo
    Sue! And you right! Typical Nigerian! Even in the USA, government does not fund any university directly...? Yet you went on to say that *Only states hand
    Message 1 of 27 , Feb 27, 2013
      Sue!

      And you right!

      Typical Nigerian!

      'Even in the USA, government does not fund any university directly...?

      Yet you went on to say that 'Only states hand money to their local universities with restrictions that demand verifiable performance.'

      Then what is 'funding'...?

      What you mean is maybe that there are no universities owned as such by the Federal Government - as is the practice in Nigeria, and for historical reasons, Nigeria is not the US - except maybe the military and naval colleges owned and financed solely by the Federal Government!

      Let us learn to express our differing views, and not this 'You are wrong!'

      Like me, you too are merely a new immigrant in the USA! You were not born or raised here, and you cannot claim to know everything about your adopted nation!

      No be so...?

      Dr. Valentine Ojo
      Tall Timbers, MD



      On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 6:35 PM, HEN-USA <godwin27411@...> wrote:
      Mazi,
      You are wrong! Even in the USA, government does not fund any university directly. Only states hand money to their local universities with restrictions that demand verifiable performance. Most universities are funded through research grants and only those who can show they have good research ideas or other kinds of contributions to make to the polity get rewarded with grants. Nigeria is a Chop I chop nation and no one at any high office has interest in building any kind of intellectual legacy. They just want salary increase. Nigerian universities do not raise private funds through their alumni because the universities think it is all about taking lecture and failing students for pety personal reasons.
       

      HEN-USA
      We Solve Productivity Problems

      From: Valentine Ojo <elewuoye@...>
      To: Nigerian ID <nigerianid@yahoogroups.com>
      Cc: QS <kanzi@...>; Segun T. Dawodu <stdawodu@...>; Benjamin Aduba <baduba54@...>; Joe Attueyi <topcrestt@...>; "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jigietseme@...>; Mobolaji ALUKO <alukome@...>; dAme jOo <thepeoplessister@...>; Binta Suleiman Gaya <sodangi1970@...>; Tunji Timi Tola <roteemee@...>; Adeniba Adepoyigi <adenibaadepoyigi@...>; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; Adeniran Adeboye <aadeboye@...>; Amauche Ude <udeamauche@...>; Anthony Momah <azkk@...>; Emeka Ugwuonye <emekaugwuonye@...>; Iyalaje <ogban_ulisa@...>; Ola Kassim <olakassimmd@...>; Olushola Fashedemi <ofashedemi@...>; Pius Adesanmi <piusadesanmi@...>; Prince Dickson <pcdbooks@...>; Rufus Orindare <batokkinc@...>; Salihu Mustafa <salihumustafa@...>; Samuel Ayodele <enugbua@...>; Suji Kolawole <sujikolawole@...>; Sylvester Idehen <idehen559@...>; Tajudeen Raji <traji@...>; wale ojo lanre <waleojolanre@...>; Yakubu Usman <yakubu.usman@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 6:25 PM
      Subject: NigerianID | Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
       
      'Fifty years ought to be enough for any university to grow, or at least reveal, its potential!

      Instead, all of our original universities have been going backward in quality and relevance, not forward.
      ' - QS <kanzi@...>

      And this is why even Nigeria's first generation universities s have not been able to produce any real 'thinkers', judging by how 'Igietseme and Kassim are viewing our thoughtless national education policy as articulated below' - .

      Do we seriously want to believe, or delude ourselves into believing that every Nigerian child who barely completes our questionable and now highly suspect secondary school curriculum is now automatically a university material - and an Einstein in the making...?

      We are obviously 'creating national universities for the sole purpose of mopping up high school leavers who are seeking admissions', and who are infrequently unqualified for admission into university education!

      Today, Nigeria is not training leaders, and neither is Nigeria training qualified professionals or technicians!

      We are merely churning out barely educated semi-illiterates who have been para boiled in our so-called understaffed and under-equipped universities!

      Today's American and British universities were not created by under-funding and starving out the Cambridge, Oxford, Harvard and Yale!

      We are sacrificing quality for highly questionable quantity!

      The nation will ultimately be the loser for that!

      Dr. Valentine Ojo
      Tall Timbers, MD

      On Tue, Feb 26, 2013 at 8:38 AM, QS <kanzi@...> wrote:
      Even if one humors the “intuitive” way that Igietseme and Kassim are viewing our thoughtless national education policy as articulated below, one would still not come away persuaded on how 53 years later, no university in Nigeria has broken out into a real center of reputable learning.
      Fifty years ought to be enough for any university to grow, or at least reveal, its potential!
      Instead, all of our original universities have been going backward in quality and relevance, not forward.
       
      You just don’t create national universities for the sole purpose of mopping up high school leavers who are seeking admissions. That is called government of the day by day. You don’t run a country like that.  
      You’d be lucky if you ended up with products who could read well. Not the way to breed thinkers.
      At the worst, you could have a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of adequate supply of technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained, good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics and about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained. Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.
       
      We can continue to deceive ourselves with more self-destruct analyses all we want over the next 50 years.
      Regardless of how we slice it, there is no reason for all the 110+ so-called universities that we have in Nigeria to be at the level of 2-year junior/community college in quality, 53 years after independence and trillion dollars in revenue.
      Absolutely no justification.
      QS
      From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
      Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 11:40 PM
      To: Nigerian ID
      Cc: Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Qansy Salako
      Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities
       
      Which Nigerian university - old or new - has any serious library...?
       
      And I am talking from personal experience!
       
      Most of them cannot even afford to subscribe to Nigerian daily newspapers!
       
      Please quote me!
       
      On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 11:12 PM, Segun T. Dawodu <stdawodu@...> wrote:
       
      There is a critical part of the argument that is being lost. 
       
      You can not create funds for NEW university while existing ones are being seriously under-funded. 
      It is like snuffing out the old university and hope the new one will take over. University of London was never under-funded to create UI neither were the 6 old universities to create the next generation. 
       
      What we are seeing is lack of funding for old universities while new ones are given billions. Also we're are the professors going to come from?
       
      There is severe shortage of published (in notable peer-reviewed journals)professors in Nigeria in many disciplines at the moment. 
       
      The argument of need versus establishment should first take resources into consideration. 
       
      Quality should be paramount before quantity. 
       
      Segun

      On Feb 25, 2013, at 4:51 PM, "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jbi8@...> wrote:
       
      Ladies and gentlemen,
      Permit me to observe that there several counter-intuitive conclusions drawn by Dr Ben Aduba in this write-up on whether Nigeria needs more universities. First, if Nigeria has the population, university-population density ratio, and the potential for universities to serve as the nuclei for economic development, how on earth would one frown against more universities in a nation where the universities can’t even absorb 10 percent of the QUALIFIED applicants applying? The better tenable argument would have been how to cope with the admissions. In fact, the few universities in Nigeria to serve the overwhelming population of QUALIFIED candidate led to the mass exodus of Nigerian students to overseas in the 70s and 80s! FACT!! I went into UNN in the mid-70s when there were just 6 universities in Nigeria; and a number of qualified students had to go overseas if they could afford it or just settle for working careers at the time.
      Secondly, it is inconceivable that one can conclude that more universities wont train more students in a geographical region where distant and opportunities and awareness can make the difference in people’s lives. There are people that have been greatly influenced to pursue further studies because of the influence of the educational institutions around them. FACT! Perhaps if we followed Dr Aduba’s logic, somebody could have made the argument in 1960 that Nigeria didn’t need more universities, such that we could have focused on EXPANDING University of Ibadan, even if the campus took over the entire of Ibadan, or even if people had to travel all the way from the NE, NC, NE, SE, East, SS, etc; thus, there could have been no need to establish UNN, ABU, UNIBEN, UNICAL, UNILORIN, UNIMAID, UNIJOS, UNILAG, UNIFE etc. Better still, Dr Aduba’s arguments would suggest that the citing of the Ibadan campus of London University in 1948 was unnecessary during the colonial era  because London University could have been expanded to accommodate any “qualified” Nigerian trying to attend a university; however, it is a FACT that the citing of UI in Nigeria INFLUENCED a number of Nigerians and afforded the opportunity to attend a university. This is also  why cities have more schools to serve their population. As I said previously,  if Nigeria was to wait until every Secondary School was of Fed Govt College standard before allowing St Peter's College Agenebode to be established, several of us would've had very rough path to education…..distance to Benin City/Ibadan, influence of the institution on the people and environment etc; or if Ogbemudia had listened to the naysayers complaining about the educational standard in converting Midwest institute to Uniben, think of how Edo and Delta people could have had the level of access to education that Uniben afforded and the fact that Uniben may rank higher than some older universities today. So  Nigeria needs more higher institutions at all loongus and corners of the nation! The return on a university education is immeasurable, regardless of the standard. FACT!!!
      The resource factor to maintain a university up to an acceptable educational standard is an IMPORTANT element in Dr Aduba’s analysis; however, I am quickly reminded of the pertinent words of a famous West African Poet, JP Clark who said: the water in the Calabash vices with the mighty Volta; as we all know, as you have the Harvard, Preston, MIT, Yale, Stanford and the Ivy League schools in USA, so you have the Univ of the District of Columbia in Wash DC and the Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas or FL Memorial College in Miami, Florida. There are Community Colleges as well! If America was to wait until they had all universities at the standard of Harvard before building the Communities Colleges and other Low and Moderate universities, or continue to EXPAND the Ivy Leagues to accommodate more students, there wont be CUNY, Howard University, Southwestern Univ etc etc. Besides, from the several universities established in the society there shall emerge the cremes, the ivy leagues and Harvards of Nigeria in near or distant future. And as Dr Ola Kassim and JUI observed previously, most educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potential”, not what is “given or immediately seen” in real terms because things can fall apart or grow into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of initiation of human development concepts like Education. Nigeria needs more universities! Take care. JU Igietseme
       
      From: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@... [mailto:nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...] On Behalf Of msabubakar@...
      Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 6:19 PM
      To: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...
      Subject: Re: [nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists] Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities
       
        On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 2:45 PM, Baduba54 <baduba54@...> wrote:
       
      DOES NIGERIA NEED MORE UNIVERSITIES?
      If one uses the population metric as a factor in deciding if more universities are needed in Nigeria (140 million at the last count) the answer is “yes”. If one uses demand (young people who want to attend universities) the answer again is “yes”. If the standard is the ratio in educated nations (number of universities per a population size), one still comes to the “yes” answer. What about the potential for economic development metric? The answer does not change. It is “yes” once more. But despite the overwhelming “yes” answers above, I say that Nigeria does not need more universities, not now. And here are my reasons.
      Nigeria cannot afford more universities.  Sometime ago just after Mr. Bolaji Aluko moved to Otuoke to found the Federal University of Otuoke a commentator alleged that the university would receive N2 billion (or something like that). The founding VC Aluko denied the amount implying that the amount was overstated. He never gave the actual allocation. I am going to assume that the actual vote was ten times that (about N20 billion). Even so we are talking about only $130 million to start a university. Mr. Aluko would agree that $130m would be about the size of the operating budget of his former university’s department of chemical engineering. Note that I wrote chemical engineering not the entire engineering department. Chemical engineering is just a fraction of the engineering department. Note also that I said operating budget. New building structures would not be part of this $130m. And Howard isn’t Harvard or MIT.
      It should be obvious that $130m to start a university is a huge joke. If one wants to start a university from scratch we must be thinking in terms of $1 billion. Nigeria cannot afford to build more universities at this time even if the population is twice 140 million.
       
      The number of universities does not necessarily mean that more students would be educated, nor does it imply that it is the most efficient way to educate more students. I am merely using FUO to illustrate my point because this institution is the best known of the other 9 institutions started a few years ago and any body could use any other one as substitute. FUO in its first year admitted 200 students in 8 departments for an average of 25 students per department. This number of additional students could have been absorbed in the existing university without one additional naira for a savings of N2-20 billion.
      I agree that the new facilities would eventually admit more students with a mere fraction of additional revenue. But that is why I say we do not need new universities now.
       
      Nigeria does not have university ready streams of students. For support for this position read again the stories about what is happening at Kaduna state school system. Schools academic faculty members could not pass exam set for 4th grade students. If faculty members who have (supposedly) already received the full education regime were not ready for beyond the 4th grade imagine the standards for the WASC holders applying to universities. It is hard to assume that this situation is peculiar to just Kaduna state. What if all northern states’ school systems is this way? What if the story is true of all Nigerian school systems? I think that instead of building more universities the available resources should be devoted to improving the quality of primary and high schools first.
      Imagine what an Aluko could do with $130 million if he were to use it to start a quality High School. It will be a match to or even better than what his old high school was like when he attended it. Those graduates would be ready for university education just as Mr. Aluko and his classmates were. Nigerians who came to North America or Europe in the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s with WASC sailed through college (any caliber of college) with flying colors. And most of them went to top schools and some worked full time while doing so.
       
      Jobs requiring college level education are not available in enough numbers for university graduates. Available jobs in agriculture, transportation, craft centers, etc do not require college education. Why waist tens of thousands of naira to educate a person for a job that a good high school education would be enough for? Why not build trade or technical schools instead? See what Peter Enahoro (Peter Pan) and his brother Tony Enahoro did with a good school certificate! They wrote more books and papers then many university graduates have read.
       
      The bottom line is we do not need more universities now. Let us stop building high schools and calling them universities.
       
      Benjamin Obiajulu Aduba
      Boston, Massachusetts
      February 25, 2013
      Sent by DiGi from my BlackBerry® Smartphone
      From: Kabiru Kalgo <kabirukalgo@...>


       
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    • Valentine Ojo
      Oh really now, we have moved past that! Igietseme is not that important! ... -- Oh really now, we have moved past that! Igietseme is not that important! On
      Message 2 of 27 , Feb 27, 2013
        Oh really now, we have moved past that!

        Igietseme is not that important!


        On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 7:51 PM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:

        I do not know him at all.  I just made the comment when I saw your reply and I sent it to you alone!

         

        PWI

         

         

         

        From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 5:10 PM
        To: Nigerian ID
        Cc: Omowunmi Iledare; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Ola Kassim; Chukwuma S. Agwunobi; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman


        Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

         

        Omowunmi Iledare: 

         

        I accept your apology.

         

        If Joe Igietseme is your friend, then talk to him:

         

        We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily - we respect our elders as opposed to some uncultured ethnic groups I would rather not name!

         

        Take care!

         

        On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 5:14 PM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:

        Sorry I did not see that.  There is no need for that either.  Let us not pay evil with evil

         

        Wumi

         

         

        From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 2:07 PM
        To: Nigerian ID
        Cc: Omowunmi Iledare; Qansy Salako; Joseph Igietseme; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman


        Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

         

        Really..?

         

        But this is good to describe a colleague..

         

        ''Dr. Ojo' 'is a man without academic credentials either in the third or first world; Ojo couldn't even make headways at Unife as a lecturer and was weeded out of academia in Nigeria; he came to the United States (America will graciously accommodate all sorts of people) and still couldn't make it in academia at the university, college or Community levels; even as a Regular High School teacher/academic level, he still couldn't make it; he finally settled for a Substitute teacher's position in which he is usually escorted by Security or Cops into class''...? - Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...

         

         

        On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 2:12 PM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:

        That is Joe Igietseme and his porous thinking faculty for you! Val, I am sure this is not a good phrase to describe a colleague, right?

         

        PWI

         

         

        From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 1:03 PM
        To: Omowunmi Iledare; DIASPORA GROUP
        Cc: QS; DIASPORA GROUP; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; <NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com>; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman


        Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

         

        And who is calling whom any names...?



        Sent from my iPad


        On Feb 27, 2013, at 10:49 AM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:

        Let us not call each other names as we discussed and deliberate on how to move Naija forward!  One road does not usually lead to the market.  We just need to find the optimal path at a given time.

         

        Stay blessed!

         

        PWI

         

         

         

        From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 9:16 AM
        To: QS; DIASPORA GROUP
        Cc: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; <NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com>; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Omowunmi Iledare
        Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

         

        That is Joe Igietseme and his porous thinking faculty for you!

         

        These are the people aspiring to show the way for other Nigerians to follow!

         

        Igietseme is the model Nigerian who has arrived, and who has finally made it in the great USA - according to Dr. Ola Kassim!



        Sent from my iPad


        On Feb 27, 2013, at 8:38 AM, "QS" <kanzi@...> wrote:

        My goodness, Joe, you actually believe in these things you say!

        Sermons on HOPE make putative logic and you don’t seem to be applying it that well.

        You may want to round the edges of your thoughts on HOPE with the following additional premises.

         

        From the individual standpoint, HOPE for a successful life based on indisciplined and wayward lifestyle is an evidence of bipolar disorder with that person.

         

        From the country standpoint, HOPE for advancement and people emancipation from unimaginative policies based on whims and caprices of its leadership is logically and intellectually indefensible. It is grand illusion.

        Your welcome.

        QS

        From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 10:33 PM
        To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
        Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

         

        QS,

        Hope is the foundation of courage and aspiration. Without hope there will be no effort, planning and expectations. We must keep hope alive!!! The hope that there will be a better tmrw despite all the odds; that if we try more and go the extra mile, our children’s generation will do better than us and posterity will smile at us; that is what keeps the human society going from generation to generation, making him beat the odds facing him, surprise himself, aspire, apply himself and achieve extraordinary dreams. Some people may argue that hope is everything! When hope is lost, the very lingering brick and fiber that hold human life and society may just give way. We can’t lose hope; that’s what no ruler or mis-ruler can take from us! Take care. JUI

         

        From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:10 PM
        To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
        Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

         

        “HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!!” Joe Igietseme

         

        HOPE ehn?.......Joe, you are a cheater.

        Why you nor tell me say na HOPE we been dey halla over, since? Kai…wuru wuru man.

        Well, HOPE will trump reality any day.

        Under HOPE, UNN will soon break out and Yahoo universities make infinite wisdom.

        For sure, if all the problems in our education sector that we see with our koro-koro eyes can be reduced to HOPE, then nothing to resolve and this brainstorming session has become moot.

        Ten years in the life of a nation is nothing, so let’s see where we are in 10 years.

        Best wishes all.

        QS

         

        From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:22 PM
        To: QS; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
        Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

         

        “”””””””Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country. ………………..In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized….What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.

        Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment. Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office. ……………….Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles. ”””””””Unquote QS!

        Hmmmmm! And the universities are not yelling everyday? Sounds really SPOOKY!!! Obviously if our assumptions and the premises for our statements are unrealistic in Nigeria, then the expected natural transition, evolution and progress in the education sector we predict will come to naught! However, let’s HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!! Take care. JUI

         

        From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:01 PM
        To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
        Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

         

        Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country.

        What you are describing is not practical in our Nigeria as it’s been run and managed from time Imo river.

        In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized.

         

        What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.

        Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment.

         

        Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office.

        FUTUOKE will be lucky to have the same level of funding once the infinitely wise Jonathan leaves As Rock.

         

        This is one of the reasons none of our universities today has a decent library of global standard or collection of reference books/sources for teaching or research.

        Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles.

        Be good.

        QS

        From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:11 AM
        To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; Nigerian Observer group; YanArewa@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

         

        QS,

        It is likely that the natural evolution of these universities will culminate in the categorization you have elegantly described; that is, the socioeconomic realities and political events in the country will shape the universities into “a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of: [first, the] ….. technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained; [second, the] good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics; and [three] about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained.”

        I agree with you that “Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.”” However, we MUST allow these universities to be established first and each one will find its lever; it will ONLY a policy revision in the education sector to distill the institutions into their respective categories. It is easier to have the universities available to find their categories than to build a university to fit a particular category; this is the realistic history educational development in most developing societies; even developed societies started on that mode and course.

        As we said previously, human development concepts like Educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potentials, aspirations or ideals”, that are not necessarily based on what is “immediately seen” in real terms because those things evolve into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of their initiation! Take care. JUI  

         

        From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:39 AM
        To: 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'
        Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

         

        Even if one humors the “intuitive” way that Igietseme and Kassim are viewing our thoughtless national education policy as articulated below, one would still not come away persuaded on how 53 years later, no university in Nigeria has broken out into a real center of reputable learning.

        Fifty years ought to be enough for any university to grow, or at least reveal, its potential!

        Instead, all of our original universities have been going backward in quality and relevance, not forward.

         

        You just don’t create national universities for the sole purpose of mopping up high school leavers who are seeking admissions. That is called government of the day by day. You don’t run a country like that.  

        You’d be lucky if you ended up with products who could read well. Not the way to breed thinkers.

        At the worst, you could have a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of adequate supply of technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained, good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics and about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained. Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.

         

        We can continue to deceive ourselves with more self-destruct analyses all we want over the next 50 years.

        Regardless of how we slice it, there is no reason for all the 110+ so-called universities that we have in Nigeria to be at the level of 2-year junior/community college in quality, 53 years after independence and trillion dollars in revenue.

        Absolutely no justification.

        QS

        From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
        Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 11:40 PM
        To: Nigerian ID
        Cc: Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Qansy Salako
        Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities

         

        Which Nigerian university - old or new - has any serious library...?

         

        And I am talking from personal experience!

         

        Most of them cannot even afford to subscribe to Nigerian daily newspapers!

         

        Please quote me!

         

        On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 11:12 PM, Segun T. Dawodu <stdawodu@...> wrote:

         

        There is a critical part of the argument that is being lost. 

         

        You can not create funds for NEW university while existing ones are being seriously under-funded. 

        It is like snuffing out the old university and hope the new one will take over. University of London was never under-funded to create UI neither were the 6 old universities to create the next generation. 

         

        What we are seeing is lack of funding for old universities while new ones are given billions. Also we're are the professors going to come from?

         

        There is severe shortage of published (in notable peer-reviewed journals)professors in Nigeria in many disciplines at the moment. 

         

        The argument of need versus establishment should first take resources into consideration. 

         

        Quality should be paramount before quantity. 

         

        Segun


        On Feb 25, 2013, at 4:51 PM, "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jbi8@...> wrote:

         

        Ladies and gentlemen,

        Permit me to observe that there several counter-intuitive conclusions drawn by Dr Ben Aduba in this write-up on whether Nigeria needs more universities. First, if Nigeria has the population, university-population density ratio, and the potential for universities to serve as the nuclei for economic development, how on earth would one frown against more universities in a nation where the universities can’t even absorb 10 percent of the QUALIFIED applicants applying? The better tenable argument would have been how to cope with the admissions. In fact, the few universities in Nigeria to serve the overwhelming population of QUALIFIED candidate led to the mass exodus of Nigerian students to overseas in the 70s and 80s! FACT!! I went into UNN in the mid-70s when there were just 6 universities in Nigeria; and a number of qualified students had to go overseas if they could afford it or just settle for working careers at the time.

        Secondly, it is inconceivable that one can conclude that more universities wont train more students in a geographical region where distant and opportunities and awareness can make the difference in people’s lives. There are people that have been greatly influenced to pursue further studies because of the influence of the educational institutions around them. FACT! Perhaps if we followed Dr Aduba’s logic, somebody could have made the argument in 1960 that Nigeria didn’t need more universities, such that we could have focused on EXPANDING University of Ibadan, even if the campus took over the entire of Ibadan, or even if people had to travel all the way from the NE, NC, NE, SE, East, SS, etc; thus, there could have been no need to establish UNN, ABU, UNIBEN, UNICAL, UNILORIN, UNIMAID, UNIJOS, UNILAG, UNIFE etc. Better still, Dr Aduba’s arguments would suggest that the citing of the Ibadan campus of London University in 1948 was unnecessary during the colonial era  because London University could have been expanded to accommodate any “qualified” Nigerian trying to attend a university; however, it is a FACT that the citing of UI in Nigeria INFLUENCED a number of Nigerians and afforded the opportunity to attend a university. This is also  why cities have more schools to serve their population. As I said previously,  if Nigeria was to wait until every Secondary School was of Fed Govt College standard before allowing St Peter's College Agenebode to be established, several of us would've had very rough path to education…..distance to Benin City/Ibadan, influence of the institution on the people and environment etc; or if Ogbemudia had listened to the naysayers complaining about the educational standard in converting Midwest institute to Uniben, think of how Edo and Delta people could have had the level of access to education that Uniben afforded and the fact that Uniben may rank higher than some older universities today. So  Nigeria needs more higher institutions at all loongus and corners of the nation! The return on a university education is immeasurable, regardless of the standard. FACT!!!

        The resource factor to maintain a university up to an acceptable educational standard is an IMPORTANT element in Dr Aduba’s analysis; however, I am quickly reminded of the pertinent words of a famous West African Poet, JP Clark who said: the water in the Calabash vices with the mighty Volta; as we all know, as you have the Harvard, Preston, MIT, Yale, Stanford and the Ivy League schools in USA, so you have the Univ of the District of Columbia in Wash DC and the Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas or FL Memorial College in Miami, Florida. There are Community Colleges as well! If America was to wait until they had all universities at the standard of Harvard before building the Communities Colleges and other Low and Moderate universities, or continue to EXPAND the Ivy Leagues to accommodate more students, there wont be CUNY, Howard University, Southwestern Univ etc etc. Besides, from the several universities established in the society there shall emerge the cremes, the ivy leagues and Harvards of Nigeria in near or distant future. And as Dr Ola Kassim and JUI observed previously, most educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potential”, not what is “given or immediately seen” in real terms because things can fall apart or grow into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of initiation of human development concepts like Education. Nigeria needs more universities! Take care. JU Igietseme

         

        From: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@... [mailto:nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...] On Behalf Of msabubakar@...
        Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 6:19 PM
        To: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...
        Subject: Re: [nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists] Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities

         

          On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 2:45 PM, Baduba54 <baduba54@...> wrote:
         
        DOES NIGERIA NEED MORE UNIVERSITIES?
        If one uses the population metric as a factor in deciding if more universities are needed in Nigeria (140 million at the last count) the answer is “yes”. If one uses demand (young people who want to attend universities) the answer again is “yes”. If the standard is the ratio in educated nations (number of universities per a population size), one still comes to the “yes” answer. What about the potential for economic development metric? The answer does not change. It is “yes” once more. But despite the overwhelming “yes” answers above, I say that Nigeria does not need more universities, not now. And here are my reasons.
        Nigeria cannot afford more universities.  Sometime ago just after Mr. Bolaji Aluko moved to Otuoke to found the Federal University of Otuoke a commentator alleged that the university would receive N2 billion (or something like that). The founding VC Aluko denied the amount implying that the amount was overstated. He never gave the actual allocation. I am going to assume that the actual vote was ten times that (about N20 billion). Even so we are talking about only $130 million to start a university. Mr. Aluko would agree that $130m would be about the size of the operating budget of his former university’s department of chemical engineering. Note that I wrote chemical engineering not the entire engineering department. Chemical engineering is just a fraction of the engineering department. Note also that I said operating budget. New building structures would not be part of this $130m. And Howard isn’t Harvard or MIT.
        It should be obvious that $130m to start a university is a huge joke. If one wants to start a university from scratch we must be thinking in terms of $1 billion. Nigeria cannot afford to build more universities at this time even if the population is twice 140 million.
         
        The number of universities does not necessarily mean that more students would be educated, nor does it imply that it is the most efficient way to educate more students. I am merely using FUO to illustrate my point because this institution is the best known of the other 9 institutions started a few years ago and any body could use any other one as substitute. FUO in its first year admitted 200 students in 8 departments for an average of 25 students per department. This number of additional students could have been absorbed in the existing university without one additional naira for a savings of N2-20 billion.
        I agree that the new facilities would eventually admit more students with a mere fraction of additional revenue. But that is why I say we do not need new universities now.
         
        Nigeria does not have university ready streams of students. For support for this position read again the stories about what is happening at Kaduna state school system. Schools academic faculty members could not pass exam set for 4th grade students. If faculty members who have (supposedly) already received the full education regime were not ready for beyond the 4th grade imagine the standards for the WASC holders applying to universities. It is hard to assume that this situation is peculiar to just Kaduna state. What if all northern states’ school systems is this way? What if the story is true of all Nigerian school systems? I think that instead of building more universities the available resources should be devoted to improving the quality of primary and high schools first.
        Imagine what an Aluko could do with $130 million if he were to use it to start a quality High School. It will be a match to or even better than what his old high school was like when he attended it. Those graduates would be ready for university education just as Mr. Aluko and his classmates were. Nigerians who came to North America or Europe in the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s with WASC sailed through college (any caliber of college) with flying colors. And most of them went to top schools and some worked full time while doing so.
         
        Jobs requiring college level education are not available in enough numbers for university graduates. Available jobs in agriculture, transportation, craft centers, etc do not require college education. Why waist tens of thousands of naira to educate a person for a job that a good high school education would be enough for? Why not build trade or technical schools instead? See what Peter Enahoro (Peter Pan) and his brother Tony Enahoro did with a good school certificate! They wrote more books and papers then many university graduates have read.
         
        The bottom line is we do not need more universities now. Let us stop building high schools and calling them universities.
         
        Benjamin Obiajulu Aduba
        Boston, Massachusetts
        February 25, 2013

        Sent by DiGi from my BlackBerry® Smartphone


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      • QS
        Joe, I had thought our dialogue on the Nigeria Education policy, which I know a few things about, would be a cat walk for me to pin you mercilessly into a
        Message 3 of 27 , Feb 27, 2013

          Joe, I had thought our dialogue on the Nigeria Education policy, which I know a few things about, would be a cat walk for me to pin you mercilessly into a logical corner, but the moment you introduced HOPE into the mix, I thought uh-oh, look at this wuru-wuru man, he is trying to escape in a parachute into the world of polemics.

           

          I don’t like it when debaters surreptitiously introduce words like HOPE, MORAL, KIND in a logical discuss. These words are not empirical by nature, they are sentimental objects. HOPE cannot be analyzed within defined coordinates of logic, it always blunts reality.

           

          You know me by now, once I say my piece and fill on an issue/topic I always Roger out as mysteriously as I Roger in. But there you go again below making such passionate case on HOPE that keeps titillating my rejoinders. I’ll just rejoin this one more time, if only to further expose one context that you continue to treat casually even though it is a major thought switch in our dialogue.

           

          Let me add to your materials on HOPE with this Muslim Hadeeth. Our Prophet Mohammed (SAW) once said [Paraphrase]: “When God told the angels that He would create man as His vicegerent on earth, the angels lamented and worried aloud that man would not live in righteousness and justice on earth. Then God told them that He planned to kill man and raise him up for accounting of his deeds on earth. The angels again worried aloud that the prospect of death would even more so not make man satisfied with his life on earth. “Then God told the angels..Ah but I will also create HOPE for man!” How did that grab you?

           

          From the above Hadeeth, because of the accounting phase where God will reward good and punish evil, any man (you, me or any of our readers) who hopes to see the good face of the Lord will need to live by God’s  issued criteria that define good/evil and stay on the side of good. Otherwise, it is unrealistic to live by evil and expect to reap good from God, here or in the hereafter.

           

          So my dear Joe, the indomitable spirit of man does not work in vaccuo, it works within a design space that Allah (SWT) has created for it.  In my allegory of the indisciplined man, if it is the wayward man’s family who are doing the hoping then your point is half right. Half right because the chance of realizing a HOPE is 50/50. However, if it was the wayward man himself who is doing the hoping and he refuses to change his ways, his hopefulness will be futile because God doesn’t withhold the wages of sin of a person or society unless that person or society first change their ways.

           

          In my allegory of the rudderless country, if the vacuous and evil leadership elites remain yoked to a lifestyle of greed and avarice that continue to cannibalize the wealth of the country and they are the one doing the hoping, then it is a useless exercise in HOPE. If it is the citizens of the country who are doing the hoping and they won’t change their lifestyle of commercializing worship of the Lord in the churches/mosques, collaborating with their evil leaderships, and duping and killing one another for money, then it is a barren exercise keeping hope alive for such a country.

           

          Yes, HOPE does offer you a hatch way to escape from our dialogue, but not by much wiggle room. The effectiveness of realizing a live HOPE depends on who is doing the hoping and what they are ready to sacrifice to achieve the sweet reward of HOPE.

          Till next time buddy…..Roger out.

          QS

          From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 9:21 AM
          To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
          Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

           

          “”””””From the individual standpoint, HOPE for a successful life based on indisciplined and wayward lifestyle is an evidence of bipolar disorder with that person.  From the country standpoint, HOPE for advancement and people emancipation from unimaginative policies based on whims and caprices of its leadership is logically and intellectually indefensible. It is grand illusion. ”””””Unquote QS!

          QS,

          Obviously yours above is brilliant, provocative and awakening! But it lacks the existential human spiritual element that makes ordinary and seemingly HOPELESS people to triumph; that has made the human existence to triumph over colossal adversities and desperate natural and man-made conditions; for instance, your aphorism does not take into consideration the happenings in human life that make people like Barack Obama to trump and prevail against the tornadoes of the Clintons, the McCain’s and the Bushes; and certainly does not take into consideration the realistic human events  and circumstances that led to Goodluck Jonathan, a poor Ijaw university lecturer to out-shine the mighty IBB, the riches of Atiku and the prominent Buhari in national democratic elections. Hope is the phenomenal although intangible bedrock upon which the logic and rationale basis for human aspiration, dreams, wishes and vision and ventures are built! Without the lingering HOPE to succeed, there will be no aspirations and dreams!

          Brother QS, without advocating fantasies, we must keep HOPE alive in our lives, irrespective of the logic and permutations surrounding the circumstances we find ourselves; as I said previously, hope is that very lingering brick and fiber that hold and sustain human life and society when all the calculations and logics point to adversity and damnation. Hope Won the World Wars for Humanity, even when Germany threatened brimstones and terror. We can’t lose hope; that’s what no terrorist, despot, ruler or mis-ruler can take from people and society! Hope is the bottom water level for any successful water spring! Lets keep hope alive in Nigeria!! Take care. JUI

           

          From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 8:38 AM
          To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
          Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

           

          My goodness, Joe, you actually believe in these things you say!

          Sermons on HOPE make putative logic and you don’t seem to be applying it that well.

          You may want to round the edges of your thoughts on HOPE with the following additional premises.

           

          From the individual standpoint, HOPE for a successful life based on indisciplined and wayward lifestyle is an evidence of bipolar disorder with that person.

           

          From the country standpoint, HOPE for advancement and people emancipation from unimaginative policies based on whims and caprices of its leadership is logically and intellectually indefensible. It is grand illusion.

          Your welcome.

          QS

          From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 10:33 PM
          To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
          Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

           

          QS,

          Hope is the foundation of courage and aspiration. Without hope there will be no effort, planning and expectations. We must keep hope alive!!! The hope that there will be a better tmrw despite all the odds; that if we try more and go the extra mile, our children’s generation will do better than us and posterity will smile at us; that is what keeps the human society going from generation to generation, making him beat the odds facing him, surprise himself, aspire, apply himself and achieve extraordinary dreams. Some people may argue that hope is everything! When hope is lost, the very lingering brick and fiber that hold human life and society may just give way. We can’t lose hope; that’s what no ruler or mis-ruler can take from us! Take care. JUI

           

          From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:10 PM
          To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
          Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

           

          “HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!!” Joe Igietseme

           

          HOPE ehn?.......Joe, you are a cheater.

          Why you nor tell me say na HOPE we been dey halla over, since? Kai…wuru wuru man.

          Well, HOPE will trump reality any day.

          Under HOPE, UNN will soon break out and Yahoo universities make infinite wisdom.

          For sure, if all the problems in our education sector that we see with our koro-koro eyes can be reduced to HOPE, then nothing to resolve and this brainstorming session has become moot.

          Ten years in the life of a nation is nothing, so let’s see where we are in 10 years.

          Best wishes all.

          QS

           

          From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:22 PM
          To: QS; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
          Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

           

          “”””””””Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country. ………………..In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized….What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.

          Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment. Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office. ……………….Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles. ”””””””Unquote QS!

          Hmmmmm! And the universities are not yelling everyday? Sounds really SPOOKY!!! Obviously if our assumptions and the premises for our statements are unrealistic in Nigeria, then the expected natural transition, evolution and progress in the education sector we predict will come to naught! However, let’s HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!! Take care. JUI

           

          From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:01 PM
          To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
          Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

           

          Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country.

          What you are describing is not practical in our Nigeria as it’s been run and managed from time Imo river.

          In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized.

           

          What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.

          Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment.

           

          Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office.

          FUTUOKE will be lucky to have the same level of funding once the infinitely wise Jonathan leaves As Rock.

           

          This is one of the reasons none of our universities today has a decent library of global standard or collection of reference books/sources for teaching or research.

          Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles.

          Be good.

          QS

          From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:11 AM
          To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; Nigerian Observer group; YanArewa@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

           

          QS,

          It is likely that the natural evolution of these universities will culminate in the categorization you have elegantly described; that is, the socioeconomic realities and political events in the country will shape the universities into “a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of: [first, the] ….. technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained; [second, the] good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics; and [three] about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained.”

          I agree with you that “Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.”” However, we MUST allow these universities to be established first and each one will find its lever; it will ONLY a policy revision in the education sector to distill the institutions into their respective categories. It is easier to have the universities available to find their categories than to build a university to fit a particular category; this is the realistic history educational development in most developing societies; even developed societies started on that mode and course.

          As we said previously, human development concepts like Educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potentials, aspirations or ideals”, that are not necessarily based on what is “immediately seen” in real terms because those things evolve into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of their initiation! Take care. JUI  

           

          From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:39 AM
          To: 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'
          Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

           

          Even if one humors the “intuitive” way that Igietseme and Kassim are viewing our thoughtless national education policy as articulated below, one would still not come away persuaded on how 53 years later, no university in Nigeria has broken out into a real center of reputable learning.

          Fifty years ought to be enough for any university to grow, or at least reveal, its potential!

          Instead, all of our original universities have been going backward in quality and relevance, not forward.

           

          You just don’t create national universities for the sole purpose of mopping up high school leavers who are seeking admissions. That is called government of the day by day. You don’t run a country like that.  

          You’d be lucky if you ended up with products who could read well. Not the way to breed thinkers.

          At the worst, you could have a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of adequate supply of technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained, good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics and about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained. Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.

           

          We can continue to deceive ourselves with more self-destruct analyses all we want over the next 50 years.

          Regardless of how we slice it, there is no reason for all the 110+ so-called universities that we have in Nigeria to be at the level of 2-year junior/community college in quality, 53 years after independence and trillion dollars in revenue.

          Absolutely no justification.

          QS

          From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
          Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 11:40 PM
          To: Nigerian ID
          Cc: Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Qansy Salako
          Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities

           

          Which Nigerian university - old or new - has any serious library...?

           

          And I am talking from personal experience!

           

          Most of them cannot even afford to subscribe to Nigerian daily newspapers!

           

          Please quote me!

           

          On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 11:12 PM, Segun T. Dawodu <stdawodu@...> wrote:

           

          There is a critical part of the argument that is being lost. 

           

          You can not create funds for NEW university while existing ones are being seriously under-funded. 

          It is like snuffing out the old university and hope the new one will take over. University of London was never under-funded to create UI neither were the 6 old universities to create the next generation. 

           

          What we are seeing is lack of funding for old universities while new ones are given billions. Also we're are the professors going to come from?

           

          There is severe shortage of published (in notable peer-reviewed journals)professors in Nigeria in many disciplines at the moment. 

           

          The argument of need versus establishment should first take resources into consideration. 

           

          Quality should be paramount before quantity. 

           

          Segun


          On Feb 25, 2013, at 4:51 PM, "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jbi8@...> wrote:

           

          Ladies and gentlemen,

          Permit me to observe that there several counter-intuitive conclusions drawn by Dr Ben Aduba in this write-up on whether Nigeria needs more universities. First, if Nigeria has the population, university-population density ratio, and the potential for universities to serve as the nuclei for economic development, how on earth would one frown against more universities in a nation where the universities can’t even absorb 10 percent of the QUALIFIED applicants applying? The better tenable argument would have been how to cope with the admissions. In fact, the few universities in Nigeria to serve the overwhelming population of QUALIFIED candidate led to the mass exodus of Nigerian students to overseas in the 70s and 80s! FACT!! I went into UNN in the mid-70s when there were just 6 universities in Nigeria; and a number of qualified students had to go overseas if they could afford it or just settle for working careers at the time.

          Secondly, it is inconceivable that one can conclude that more universities wont train more students in a geographical region where distant and opportunities and awareness can make the difference in people’s lives. There are people that have been greatly influenced to pursue further studies because of the influence of the educational institutions around them. FACT! Perhaps if we followed Dr Aduba’s logic, somebody could have made the argument in 1960 that Nigeria didn’t need more universities, such that we could have focused on EXPANDING University of Ibadan, even if the campus took over the entire of Ibadan, or even if people had to travel all the way from the NE, NC, NE, SE, East, SS, etc; thus, there could have been no need to establish UNN, ABU, UNIBEN, UNICAL, UNILORIN, UNIMAID, UNIJOS, UNILAG, UNIFE etc. Better still, Dr Aduba’s arguments would suggest that the citing of the Ibadan campus of London University in 1948 was unnecessary during the colonial era  because London University could have been expanded to accommodate any “qualified” Nigerian trying to attend a university; however, it is a FACT that the citing of UI in Nigeria INFLUENCED a number of Nigerians and afforded the opportunity to attend a university. This is also  why cities have more schools to serve their population. As I said previously,  if Nigeria was to wait until every Secondary School was of Fed Govt College standard before allowing St Peter's College Agenebode to be established, several of us would've had very rough path to education…..distance to Benin City/Ibadan, influence of the institution on the people and environment etc; or if Ogbemudia had listened to the naysayers complaining about the educational standard in converting Midwest institute to Uniben, think of how Edo and Delta people could have had the level of access to education that Uniben afforded and the fact that Uniben may rank higher than some older universities today. So  Nigeria needs more higher institutions at all loongus and corners of the nation! The return on a university education is immeasurable, regardless of the standard. FACT!!!

          The resource factor to maintain a university up to an acceptable educational standard is an IMPORTANT element in Dr Aduba’s analysis; however, I am quickly reminded of the pertinent words of a famous West African Poet, JP Clark who said: the water in the Calabash vices with the mighty Volta; as we all know, as you have the Harvard, Preston, MIT, Yale, Stanford and the Ivy League schools in USA, so you have the Univ of the District of Columbia in Wash DC and the Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas or FL Memorial College in Miami, Florida. There are Community Colleges as well! If America was to wait until they had all universities at the standard of Harvard before building the Communities Colleges and other Low and Moderate universities, or continue to EXPAND the Ivy Leagues to accommodate more students, there wont be CUNY, Howard University, Southwestern Univ etc etc. Besides, from the several universities established in the society there shall emerge the cremes, the ivy leagues and Harvards of Nigeria in near or distant future. And as Dr Ola Kassim and JUI observed previously, most educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potential”, not what is “given or immediately seen” in real terms because things can fall apart or grow into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of initiation of human development concepts like Education. Nigeria needs more universities! Take care. JU Igietseme

           

          From: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@... [mailto:nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...] On Behalf Of msabubakar@...
          Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 6:19 PM
          To: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...
          Subject: Re: [nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists] Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities

           

            On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 2:45 PM, Baduba54 <baduba54@...> wrote:
           
          DOES NIGERIA NEED MORE UNIVERSITIES?
          If one uses the population metric as a factor in deciding if more universities are needed in Nigeria (140 million at the last count) the answer is “yes”. If one uses demand (young people who want to attend universities) the answer again is “yes”. If the standard is the ratio in educated nations (number of universities per a population size), one still comes to the “yes” answer. What about the potential for economic development metric? The answer does not change. It is “yes” once more. But despite the overwhelming “yes” answers above, I say that Nigeria does not need more universities, not now. And here are my reasons.
          Nigeria cannot afford more universities.  Sometime ago just after Mr. Bolaji Aluko moved to Otuoke to found the Federal University of Otuoke a commentator alleged that the university would receive N2 billion (or something like that). The founding VC Aluko denied the amount implying that the amount was overstated. He never gave the actual allocation. I am going to assume that the actual vote was ten times that (about N20 billion). Even so we are talking about only $130 million to start a university. Mr. Aluko would agree that $130m would be about the size of the operating budget of his former university’s department of chemical engineering. Note that I wrote chemical engineering not the entire engineering department. Chemical engineering is just a fraction of the engineering department. Note also that I said operating budget. New building structures would not be part of this $130m. And Howard isn’t Harvard or MIT.
          It should be obvious that $130m to start a university is a huge joke. If one wants to start a university from scratch we must be thinking in terms of $1 billion. Nigeria cannot afford to build more universities at this time even if the population is twice 140 million.
           
          The number of universities does not necessarily mean that more students would be educated, nor does it imply that it is the most efficient way to educate more students. I am merely using FUO to illustrate my point because this institution is the best known of the other 9 institutions started a few years ago and any body could use any other one as substitute. FUO in its first year admitted 200 students in 8 departments for an average of 25 students per department. This number of additional students could have been absorbed in the existing university without one additional naira for a savings of N2-20 billion.
          I agree that the new facilities would eventually admit more students with a mere fraction of additional revenue. But that is why I say we do not need new universities now.
           
          Nigeria does not have university ready streams of students. For support for this position read again the stories about what is happening at Kaduna state school system. Schools academic faculty members could not pass exam set for 4th grade students. If faculty members who have (supposedly) already received the full education regime were not ready for beyond the 4th grade imagine the standards for the WASC holders applying to universities. It is hard to assume that this situation is peculiar to just Kaduna state. What if all northern states’ school systems is this way? What if the story is true of all Nigerian school systems? I think that instead of building more universities the available resources should be devoted to improving the quality of primary and high schools first.
          Imagine what an Aluko could do with $130 million if he were to use it to start a quality High School. It will be a match to or even better than what his old high school was like when he attended it. Those graduates would be ready for university education just as Mr. Aluko and his classmates were. Nigerians who came to North America or Europe in the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s with WASC sailed through college (any caliber of college) with flying colors. And most of them went to top schools and some worked full time while doing so.
           
          Jobs requiring college level education are not available in enough numbers for university graduates. Available jobs in agriculture, transportation, craft centers, etc do not require college education. Why waist tens of thousands of naira to educate a person for a job that a good high school education would be enough for? Why not build trade or technical schools instead? See what Peter Enahoro (Peter Pan) and his brother Tony Enahoro did with a good school certificate! They wrote more books and papers then many university graduates have read.
           
          The bottom line is we do not need more universities now. Let us stop building high schools and calling them universities.
           
          Benjamin Obiajulu Aduba
          Boston, Massachusetts
          February 25, 2013

          Sent by DiGi from my BlackBerry® Smartphone


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        • Ayo Ojutalayo
          Omowunmi, Don t mind Val Ojo. He invited what he has been getting in the last couple of days by provoking those he believed he was older than. We Yorubas don t
          Message 4 of 27 , Feb 27, 2013
            Omowunmi,

            Don't mind Val Ojo. He invited what he has been getting in the last couple of days by provoking those he believed he was older than. We Yorubas don't provoke those that are younger or older  than us. Just watch what he writes on the fora henceforth. He abuses, insults and curses forumites and their parents for expressing opinions that don't agree with his. You will soon know him better. How he knows he is older than people he provokes on the fora beats my imagination.

            Ayo Ojutalayo



            From: Valentine Ojo <elewuoye@...>
            To: Nigerian ID <nigerianid@yahoogroups.com>
            Cc: Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...>; "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jigietseme@...>; Ola Kassim <olakassimmd@...>; Chukwuma S. Agwunobi <agwu22@...>; Adeniba Adepoyigi <adenibaadepoyigi@...>; Amauche Ude <udeamauche@...>; Anthony Momah <azkk@...>; Emeka Ugwuonye <emekaugwuonye@...>; Iyalaje <ogban_ulisa@...>; Olushola Fashedemi <ofashedemi@...>; Pius Adesanmi <piusadesanmi@...>; Prince Dickson <pcdbooks@...>; Rufus Orindare <batokkinc@...>; Salihu Mustafa <salihumustafa@...>; Samuel Ayodele <enugbua@...>; Suji Kolawole <sujikolawole@...>; Sylvester Idehen <idehen559@...>; Tajudeen Raji <traji@...>; wale ojo lanre <waleojolanre@...>; Yakubu Usman <yakubu.usman@...>
            Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 6:09 PM
            Subject: NigerianID | We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily

             
            Omowunmi Iledare: 

            I accept your apology.

            If Joe Igietseme is your friend, then talk to him:

            We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily - we respect our elders as opposed to some uncultured ethnic groups I would rather not name!

            Take care!


            On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 5:14 PM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:
            Sorry I did not see that.  There is no need for that either.  Let us not pay evil with evil
             
            Wumi
             
             
            From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 2:07 PM
            To: Nigerian ID
            Cc: Omowunmi Iledare; Qansy Salako; Joseph Igietseme; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman

            Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
             
            Really..?
             
            But this is good to describe a colleague..
             
            ''Dr. Ojo' 'is a man without academic credentials either in the third or first world; Ojo couldn't even make headways at Unife as a lecturer and was weeded out of academia in Nigeria; he came to the United States (America will graciously accommodate all sorts of people) and still couldn't make it in academia at the university, college or Community levels; even as a Regular High School teacher/academic level, he still couldn't make it; he finally settled for a Substitute teacher's position in which he is usually escorted by Security or Cops into class''...? - Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...
             
             
            On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 2:12 PM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:
            That is Joe Igietseme and his porous thinking faculty for you! Val, I am sure this is not a good phrase to describe a colleague, right?
             
            PWI
             
             
            From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 1:03 PM
            To: Omowunmi Iledare; DIASPORA GROUP
            Cc: QS; DIASPORA GROUP; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; <NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com>; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman

            Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
             
            And who is calling whom any names...?


            Sent from my iPad

            On Feb 27, 2013, at 10:49 AM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:
            Let us not call each other names as we discussed and deliberate on how to move Naija forward!  One road does not usually lead to the market.  We just need to find the optimal path at a given time.
             
            Stay blessed!
             
            PWI
             
             
             
            From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 9:16 AM
            To: QS; DIASPORA GROUP
            Cc: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; <NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com>; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Omowunmi Iledare
            Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
             
            That is Joe Igietseme and his porous thinking faculty for you!
             
            These are the people aspiring to show the way for other Nigerians to follow!
             
            Igietseme is the model Nigerian who has arrived, and who has finally made it in the great USA - according to Dr. Ola Kassim!


            Sent from my iPad

            On Feb 27, 2013, at 8:38 AM, "QS" <kanzi@...> wrote:
            My goodness, Joe, you actually believe in these things you say!
            Sermons on HOPE make putative logic and you don’t seem to be applying it that well.
            You may want to round the edges of your thoughts on HOPE with the following additional premises.
             
            From the individual standpoint, HOPE for a successful life based on indisciplined and wayward lifestyle is an evidence of bipolar disorder with that person.
             
            From the country standpoint, HOPE for advancement and people emancipation from unimaginative policies based on whims and caprices of its leadership is logically and intellectually indefensible. It is grand illusion.
            Your welcome.
            QS
            From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 10:33 PM
            To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
            Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
             
            QS,
            Hope is the foundation of courage and aspiration. Without hope there will be no effort, planning and expectations. We must keep hope alive!!! The hope that there will be a better tmrw despite all the odds; that if we try more and go the extra mile, our children’s generation will do better than us and posterity will smile at us; that is what keeps the human society going from generation to generation, making him beat the odds facing him, surprise himself, aspire, apply himself and achieve extraordinary dreams. Some people may argue that hope is everything! When hope is lost, the very lingering brick and fiber that hold human life and society may just give way. We can’t lose hope; that’s what no ruler or mis-ruler can take from us! Take care. JUI
             
            From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:10 PM
            To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
            Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
             
            “HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!!” Joe Igietseme
             
            HOPE ehn?.......Joe, you are a cheater.
            Why you nor tell me say na HOPE we been dey halla over, since? Kai…wuru wuru man.
            Well, HOPE will trump reality any day.
            Under HOPE, UNN will soon break out and Yahoo universities make infinite wisdom.
            For sure, if all the problems in our education sector that we see with our koro-koro eyes can be reduced to HOPE, then nothing to resolve and this brainstorming session has become moot.
            Ten years in the life of a nation is nothing, so let’s see where we are in 10 years.
            Best wishes all.
            QS
             
            From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:22 PM
            To: QS; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
            Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
             
            “”””””””Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country. ………………..In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized….What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.
            Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment. Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office. ……………….Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles. ”””””””Unquote QS!
            Hmmmmm! And the universities are not yelling everyday? Sounds really SPOOKY!!! Obviously if our assumptions and the premises for our statements are unrealistic in Nigeria, then the expected natural transition, evolution and progress in the education sector we predict will come to naught! However, let’s HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!! Take care. JUI
             
            From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:01 PM
            To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
            Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
             
            Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country.
            What you are describing is not practical in our Nigeria as it’s been run and managed from time Imo river.
            In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized.
             
            What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.
            Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment.
             
            Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office.
            FUTUOKE will be lucky to have the same level of funding once the infinitely wise Jonathan leaves As Rock.
             
            This is one of the reasons none of our universities today has a decent library of global standard or collection of reference books/sources for teaching or research.
            Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles.
            Be good.
            QS
            From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:11 AM
            To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; Nigerian Observer group; YanArewa@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
             
            QS,
            It is likely that the natural evolution of these universities will culminate in the categorization you have elegantly described; that is, the socioeconomic realities and political events in the country will shape the universities into “a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of: [first, the] ….. technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained; [second, the] good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics; and [three] about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained.”
            I agree with you that “Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.”” However, we MUST allow these universities to be established first and each one will find its lever; it will ONLY a policy revision in the education sector to distill the institutions into their respective categories. It is easier to have the universities available to find their categories than to build a university to fit a particular category; this is the realistic history educational development in most developing societies; even developed societies started on that mode and course.
            As we said previously, human development concepts like Educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potentials, aspirations or ideals”, that are not necessarily based on what is “immediately seen” in real terms because those things evolve into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of their initiation! Take care. JUI  
             
            From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:39 AM
            To: 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'
            Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
             
            Even if one humors the “intuitive” way that Igietseme and Kassim are viewing our thoughtless national education policy as articulated below, one would still not come away persuaded on how 53 years later, no university in Nigeria has broken out into a real center of reputable learning.
            Fifty years ought to be enough for any university to grow, or at least reveal, its potential!
            Instead, all of our original universities have been going backward in quality and relevance, not forward.
             
            You just don’t create national universities for the sole purpose of mopping up high school leavers who are seeking admissions. That is called government of the day by day. You don’t run a country like that.  
            You’d be lucky if you ended up with products who could read well. Not the way to breed thinkers.
            At the worst, you could have a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of adequate supply of technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained, good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics and about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained. Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.
             
            We can continue to deceive ourselves with more self-destruct analyses all we want over the next 50 years.
            Regardless of how we slice it, there is no reason for all the 110+ so-called universities that we have in Nigeria to be at the level of 2-year junior/community college in quality, 53 years after independence and trillion dollars in revenue.
            Absolutely no justification.
            QS
            From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
            Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 11:40 PM
            To: Nigerian ID
            Cc: Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Qansy Salako
            Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities
             
            Which Nigerian university - old or new - has any serious library...?
             
            And I am talking from personal experience!
             
            Most of them cannot even afford to subscribe to Nigerian daily newspapers!
             
            Please quote me!
             
            On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 11:12 PM, Segun T. Dawodu <stdawodu@...> wrote:
             
            There is a critical part of the argument that is being lost. 
             
            You can not create funds for NEW university while existing ones are being seriously under-funded. 
            It is like snuffing out the old university and hope the new one will take over. University of London was never under-funded to create UI neither were the 6 old universities to create the next generation. 
             
            What we are seeing is lack of funding for old universities while new ones are given billions. Also we're are the professors going to come from?
             
            There is severe shortage of published (in notable peer-reviewed journals)professors in Nigeria in many disciplines at the moment. 
             
            The argument of need versus establishment should first take resources into consideration. 
             
            Quality should be paramount before quantity. 
             
            Segun

            On Feb 25, 2013, at 4:51 PM, "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jbi8@...> wrote:
             
            Ladies and gentlemen,
            Permit me to observe that there several counter-intuitive conclusions drawn by Dr Ben Aduba in this write-up on whether Nigeria needs more universities. First, if Nigeria has the population, university-population density ratio, and the potential for universities to serve as the nuclei for economic development, how on earth would one frown against more universities in a nation where the universities can’t even absorb 10 percent of the QUALIFIED applicants applying? The better tenable argument would have been how to cope with the admissions. In fact, the few universities in Nigeria to serve the overwhelming population of QUALIFIED candidate led to the mass exodus of Nigerian students to overseas in the 70s and 80s! FACT!! I went into UNN in the mid-70s when there were just 6 universities in Nigeria; and a number of qualified students had to go overseas if they could afford it or just settle for working careers at the time.
            Secondly, it is inconceivable that one can conclude that more universities wont train more students in a geographical region where distant and opportunities and awareness can make the difference in people’s lives. There are people that have been greatly influenced to pursue further studies because of the influence of the educational institutions around them. FACT! Perhaps if we followed Dr Aduba’s logic, somebody could have made the argument in 1960 that Nigeria didn’t need more universities, such that we could have focused on EXPANDING University of Ibadan, even if the campus took over the entire of Ibadan, or even if people had to travel all the way from the NE, NC, NE, SE, East, SS, etc; thus, there could have been no need to establish UNN, ABU, UNIBEN, UNICAL, UNILORIN, UNIMAID, UNIJOS, UNILAG, UNIFE etc. Better still, Dr Aduba’s arguments would suggest that the citing of the Ibadan campus of London University in 1948 was unnecessary during the colonial era  because London University could have been expanded to accommodate any “qualified” Nigerian trying to attend a university; however, it is a FACT that the citing of UI in Nigeria INFLUENCED a number of Nigerians and afforded the opportunity to attend a university. This is also  why cities have more schools to serve their population. As I said previously,  if Nigeria was to wait until every Secondary School was of Fed Govt College standard before allowing St Peter's College Agenebode to be established, several of us would've had very rough path to education…..distance to Benin City/Ibadan, influence of the institution on the people and environment etc; or if Ogbemudia had listened to the naysayers complaining about the educational standard in converting Midwest institute to Uniben, think of how Edo and Delta people could have had the level of access to education that Uniben afforded and the fact that Uniben may rank higher than some older universities today. So  Nigeria needs more higher institutions at all loongus and corners of the nation! The return on a university education is immeasurable, regardless of the standard. FACT!!!
            The resource factor to maintain a university up to an acceptable educational standard is an IMPORTANT element in Dr Aduba’s analysis; however, I am quickly reminded of the pertinent words of a famous West African Poet, JP Clark who said: the water in the Calabash vices with the mighty Volta; as we all know, as you have the Harvard, Preston, MIT, Yale, Stanford and the Ivy League schools in USA, so you have the Univ of the District of Columbia in Wash DC and the Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas or FL Memorial College in Miami, Florida. There are Community Colleges as well! If America was to wait until they had all universities at the standard of Harvard before building the Communities Colleges and other Low and Moderate universities, or continue to EXPAND the Ivy Leagues to accommodate more students, there wont be CUNY, Howard University, Southwestern Univ etc etc. Besides, from the several universities established in the society there shall emerge the cremes, the ivy leagues and Harvards of Nigeria in near or distant future. And as Dr Ola Kassim and JUI observed previously, most educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potential”, not what is “given or immediately seen” in real terms because things can fall apart or grow into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of initiation of human development concepts like Education. Nigeria needs more universities! Take care. JU Igietseme
             
            From: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@... [mailto:nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...] On Behalf Of msabubakar@...
            Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 6:19 PM
            To: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...
            Subject: Re: [nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists] Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities
             
              On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 2:45 PM, Baduba54 <baduba54@...> wrote:
             
            DOES NIGERIA NEED MORE UNIVERSITIES?
            If one uses the population metric as a factor in deciding if more universities are needed in Nigeria (140 million at the last count) the answer is “yes”. If one uses demand (young people who want to attend universities) the answer again is “yes”. If the standard is the ratio in educated nations (number of universities per a population size), one still comes to the “yes” answer. What about the potential for economic development metric? The answer does not change. It is “yes” once more. But despite the overwhelming “yes” answers above, I say that Nigeria does not need more universities, not now. And here are my reasons.
            Nigeria cannot afford more universities.  Sometime ago just after Mr. Bolaji Aluko moved to Otuoke to found the Federal University of Otuoke a commentator alleged that the university would receive N2 billion (or something like that). The founding VC Aluko denied the amount implying that the amount was overstated. He never gave the actual allocation. I am going to assume that the actual vote was ten times that (about N20 billion). Even so we are talking about only $130 million to start a university. Mr. Aluko would agree that $130m would be about the size of the operating budget of his former university’s department of chemical engineering. Note that I wrote chemical engineering not the entire engineering department. Chemical engineering is just a fraction of the engineering department. Note also that I said operating budget. New building structures would not be part of this $130m. And Howard isn’t Harvard or MIT.
            It should be obvious that $130m to start a university is a huge joke. If one wants to start a university from scratch we must be thinking in terms of $1 billion. Nigeria cannot afford to build more universities at this time even if the population is twice 140 million.
             
            The number of universities does not necessarily mean that more students would be educated, nor does it imply that it is the most efficient way to educate more students. I am merely using FUO to illustrate my point because this institution is the best known of the other 9 institutions started a few years ago and any body could use any other one as substitute. FUO in its first year admitted 200 students in 8 departments for an average of 25 students per department. This number of additional students could have been absorbed in the existing university without one additional naira for a savings of N2-20 billion.
            I agree that the new facilities would eventually admit more students with a mere fraction of additional revenue. But that is why I say we do not need new universities now.
             
            Nigeria does not have university ready streams of students. For support for this position read again the stories about what is happening at Kaduna state school system. Schools academic faculty members could not pass exam set for 4th grade students. If faculty members who have (supposedly) already received the full education regime were not ready for beyond the 4th grade imagine the standards for the WASC holders applying to universities. It is hard to assume that this situation is peculiar to just Kaduna state. What if all northern states’ school systems is this way? What if the story is true of all Nigerian school systems? I think that instead of building more universities the available resources should be devoted to improving the quality of primary and high schools first.
            Imagine what an Aluko could do with $130 million if he were to use it to start a quality High School. It will be a match to or even better than what his old high school was like when he attended it. Those graduates would be ready for university education just as Mr. Aluko and his classmates were. Nigerians who came to North America or Europe in the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s with WASC sailed through college (any caliber of college) with flying colors. And most of them went to top schools and some worked full time while doing so.
             
            Jobs requiring college level education are not available in enough numbers for university graduates. Available jobs in agriculture, transportation, craft centers, etc do not require college education. Why waist tens of thousands of naira to educate a person for a job that a good high school education would be enough for? Why not build trade or technical schools instead? See what Peter Enahoro (Peter Pan) and his brother Tony Enahoro did with a good school certificate! They wrote more books and papers then many university graduates have read.
             
            The bottom line is we do not need more universities now. Let us stop building high schools and calling them universities.
             
            Benjamin Obiajulu Aduba
            Boston, Massachusetts
            February 25, 2013
            Sent by DiGi from my BlackBerry® Smartphone

            From: Kabiru Kalgo <kabirukalgo@...>


             
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          • Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)
            QS, Not so fast with Roger’s outing! If we get your POINT well, from the Islamic religious metaphor you presented on the pillars of creation of man as
            Message 5 of 27 , Feb 27, 2013

              QS,

              Not so fast with Roger’s outing! If we get your POINT well, from the Islamic religious metaphor you presented on the pillars of creation of man as God’s Vicegerent or representative on earth, y’re are essentially suggesting or in other words positing that the very existence of humanity and possibly its purpose on earth is anchored on Hope! Except you want us to throw religion away; do you? Let me know, so I can introduce the follow up: when?!!! I am confident that you wouldn’t because religion provides an important guide to the meaning and purpose of man’s life!

              Besides, if we further extend your religious connotation of the role of hope in ensuring human allegiance to his maker/creator, y’ll find that without hope humanity and specifically human life is meaningless since he realizes that he is at the mercy of nature, uncertainties and numerous unknowns about his life and society, notwithstanding the considerable inroads science has made into understanding these issues. In essence, the HOPE of receiving God’s mercies if one does good or eschew evil [as you have eloquently captured below], and the HOPE that the grand design of nature or the Creator will ultimately benefit humanity, have combined to keep man going in a life fated with uncertainties, fears and inescapable ultimate demise!

              Anchored on the foregoing premises, one can safely say that life meaning is built on HOPE! Both at the individual and societal levels, HOPE drives aspirations and even the confidence to aspire and expect progressive outcomes, in rain and shine, when under self-inflicted indiscipline or under mis-rulership, as well as societal rot. Lets keep HOPE alive; if not, we wont even confidently muster the courage and audacity to change individual or societal bad to good. Nagode QS and take care. JUI

               

              From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
              Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 10:33 PM
              To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'
              Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

               

              Joe, I had thought our dialogue on the Nigeria Education policy, which I know a few things about, would be a cat walk for me to pin you mercilessly into a logical corner, but the moment you introduced HOPE into the mix, I thought uh-oh, look at this wuru-wuru man, he is trying to escape in a parachute into the world of polemics.

               

              I don’t like it when debaters surreptitiously introduce words like HOPE, MORAL, KIND in a logical discuss. These words are not empirical by nature, they are sentimental objects. HOPE cannot be analyzed within defined coordinates of logic, it always blunts reality.

               

              You know me by now, once I say my piece and fill on an issue/topic I always Roger out as mysteriously as I Roger in. But there you go again below making such passionate case on HOPE that keeps titillating my rejoinders. I’ll just rejoin this one more time, if only to further expose one context that you continue to treat casually even though it is a major thought switch in our dialogue.

               

              Let me add to your materials on HOPE with this Muslim Hadeeth. Our Prophet Mohammed (SAW) once said [Paraphrase]: “When God told the angels that He would create man as His vicegerent on earth, the angels lamented and worried aloud that man would not live in righteousness and justice on earth. Then God told them that He planned to kill man and raise him up for accounting of his deeds on earth. The angels again worried aloud that the prospect of death would even more so not make man satisfied with his life on earth. “Then God told the angels..Ah but I will also create HOPE for man!” How did that grab you?

               

              From the above Hadeeth, because of the accounting phase where God will reward good and punish evil, any man (you, me or any of our readers) who hopes to see the good face of the Lord will need to live by God’s  issued criteria that define good/evil and stay on the side of good. Otherwise, it is unrealistic to live by evil and expect to reap good from God, here or in the hereafter.

               

              So my dear Joe, the indomitable spirit of man does not work in vaccuo, it works within a design space that Allah (SWT) has created for it.  In my allegory of the indisciplined man, if it is the wayward man’s family who are doing the hoping then your point is half right. Half right because the chance of realizing a HOPE is 50/50. However, if it was the wayward man himself who is doing the hoping and he refuses to change his ways, his hopefulness will be futile because God doesn’t withhold the wages of sin of a person or society unless that person or society first change their ways.

               

              In my allegory of the rudderless country, if the vacuous and evil leadership elites remain yoked to a lifestyle of greed and avarice that continue to cannibalize the wealth of the country and they are the one doing the hoping, then it is a useless exercise in HOPE. If it is the citizens of the country who are doing the hoping and they won’t change their lifestyle of commercializing worship of the Lord in the churches/mosques, collaborating with their evil leaderships, and duping and killing one another for money, then it is a barren exercise keeping hope alive for such a country.

               

              Yes, HOPE does offer you a hatch way to escape from our dialogue, but not by much wiggle room. The effectiveness of realizing a live HOPE depends on who is doing the hoping and what they are ready to sacrifice to achieve the sweet reward of HOPE.

              Till next time buddy…..Roger out.

              QS

              From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
              Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 9:21 AM
              To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
              Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

               

              “”””””From the individual standpoint, HOPE for a successful life based on indisciplined and wayward lifestyle is an evidence of bipolar disorder with that person.  From the country standpoint, HOPE for advancement and people emancipation from unimaginative policies based on whims and caprices of its leadership is logically and intellectually indefensible. It is grand illusion. ”””””Unquote QS!

              QS,

              Obviously yours above is brilliant, provocative and awakening! But it lacks the existential human spiritual element that makes ordinary and seemingly HOPELESS people to triumph; that has made the human existence to triumph over colossal adversities and desperate natural and man-made conditions; for instance, your aphorism does not take into consideration the happenings in human life that make people like Barack Obama to trump and prevail against the tornadoes of the Clintons, the McCain’s and the Bushes; and certainly does not take into consideration the realistic human events  and circumstances that led to Goodluck Jonathan, a poor Ijaw university lecturer to out-shine the mighty IBB, the riches of Atiku and the prominent Buhari in national democratic elections. Hope is the phenomenal although intangible bedrock upon which the logic and rationale basis for human aspiration, dreams, wishes and vision and ventures are built! Without the lingering HOPE to succeed, there will be no aspirations and dreams!

              Brother QS, without advocating fantasies, we must keep HOPE alive in our lives, irrespective of the logic and permutations surrounding the circumstances we find ourselves; as I said previously, hope is that very lingering brick and fiber that hold and sustain human life and society when all the calculations and logics point to adversity and damnation. Hope Won the World Wars for Humanity, even when Germany threatened brimstones and terror. We can’t lose hope; that’s what no terrorist, despot, ruler or mis-ruler can take from people and society! Hope is the bottom water level for any successful water spring! Lets keep hope alive in Nigeria!! Take care. JUI

               

              From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
              Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 8:38 AM
              To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
              Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

               

              My goodness, Joe, you actually believe in these things you say!

              Sermons on HOPE make putative logic and you don’t seem to be applying it that well.

              You may want to round the edges of your thoughts on HOPE with the following additional premises.

               

              From the individual standpoint, HOPE for a successful life based on indisciplined and wayward lifestyle is an evidence of bipolar disorder with that person.

               

              From the country standpoint, HOPE for advancement and people emancipation from unimaginative policies based on whims and caprices of its leadership is logically and intellectually indefensible. It is grand illusion.

              Your welcome.

              QS

              From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 10:33 PM
              To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
              Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

               

              QS,

              Hope is the foundation of courage and aspiration. Without hope there will be no effort, planning and expectations. We must keep hope alive!!! The hope that there will be a better tmrw despite all the odds; that if we try more and go the extra mile, our children’s generation will do better than us and posterity will smile at us; that is what keeps the human society going from generation to generation, making him beat the odds facing him, surprise himself, aspire, apply himself and achieve extraordinary dreams. Some people may argue that hope is everything! When hope is lost, the very lingering brick and fiber that hold human life and society may just give way. We can’t lose hope; that’s what no ruler or mis-ruler can take from us! Take care. JUI

               

              From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:10 PM
              To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
              Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

               

              “HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!!” Joe Igietseme

               

              HOPE ehn?.......Joe, you are a cheater.

              Why you nor tell me say na HOPE we been dey halla over, since? Kai…wuru wuru man.

              Well, HOPE will trump reality any day.

              Under HOPE, UNN will soon break out and Yahoo universities make infinite wisdom.

              For sure, if all the problems in our education sector that we see with our koro-koro eyes can be reduced to HOPE, then nothing to resolve and this brainstorming session has become moot.

              Ten years in the life of a nation is nothing, so let’s see where we are in 10 years.

              Best wishes all.

              QS

               

              From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:22 PM
              To: QS; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
              Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

               

              “”””””””Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country. ………………..In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized….What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.

              Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment. Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office. ……………….Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles. ”””””””Unquote QS!

              Hmmmmm! And the universities are not yelling everyday? Sounds really SPOOKY!!! Obviously if our assumptions and the premises for our statements are unrealistic in Nigeria, then the expected natural transition, evolution and progress in the education sector we predict will come to naught! However, let’s HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!! Take care. JUI

               

              From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:01 PM
              To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
              Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

               

              Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country.

              What you are describing is not practical in our Nigeria as it’s been run and managed from time Imo river.

              In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized.

               

              What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.

              Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment.

               

              Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office.

              FUTUOKE will be lucky to have the same level of funding once the infinitely wise Jonathan leaves As Rock.

               

              This is one of the reasons none of our universities today has a decent library of global standard or collection of reference books/sources for teaching or research.

              Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles.

              Be good.

              QS

              From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:11 AM
              To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; Nigerian Observer group; YanArewa@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

               

              QS,

              It is likely that the natural evolution of these universities will culminate in the categorization you have elegantly described; that is, the socioeconomic realities and political events in the country will shape the universities into “a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of: [first, the] ….. technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained; [second, the] good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics; and [three] about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained.”

              I agree with you that “Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.”” However, we MUST allow these universities to be established first and each one will find its lever; it will ONLY a policy revision in the education sector to distill the institutions into their respective categories. It is easier to have the universities available to find their categories than to build a university to fit a particular category; this is the realistic history educational development in most developing societies; even developed societies started on that mode and course.

              As we said previously, human development concepts like Educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potentials, aspirations or ideals”, that are not necessarily based on what is “immediately seen” in real terms because those things evolve into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of their initiation! Take care. JUI  

               

              From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:39 AM
              To: 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'
              Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities

               

              Even if one humors the “intuitive” way that Igietseme and Kassim are viewing our thoughtless national education policy as articulated below, one would still not come away persuaded on how 53 years later, no university in Nigeria has broken out into a real center of reputable learning.

              Fifty years ought to be enough for any university to grow, or at least reveal, its potential!

              Instead, all of our original universities have been going backward in quality and relevance, not forward.

               

              You just don’t create national universities for the sole purpose of mopping up high school leavers who are seeking admissions. That is called government of the day by day. You don’t run a country like that.  

              You’d be lucky if you ended up with products who could read well. Not the way to breed thinkers.

              At the worst, you could have a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of adequate supply of technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained, good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics and about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained. Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.

               

              We can continue to deceive ourselves with more self-destruct analyses all we want over the next 50 years.

              Regardless of how we slice it, there is no reason for all the 110+ so-called universities that we have in Nigeria to be at the level of 2-year junior/community college in quality, 53 years after independence and trillion dollars in revenue.

              Absolutely no justification.

              QS

              From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
              Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 11:40 PM
              To: Nigerian ID
              Cc: Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Qansy Salako
              Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities

               

              Which Nigerian university - old or new - has any serious library...?

               

              And I am talking from personal experience!

               

              Most of them cannot even afford to subscribe to Nigerian daily newspapers!

               

              Please quote me!

               

              On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 11:12 PM, Segun T. Dawodu <stdawodu@...> wrote:

               

              There is a critical part of the argument that is being lost. 

               

              You can not create funds for NEW university while existing ones are being seriously under-funded. 

              It is like snuffing out the old university and hope the new one will take over. University of London was never under-funded to create UI neither were the 6 old universities to create the next generation. 

               

              What we are seeing is lack of funding for old universities while new ones are given billions. Also we're are the professors going to come from?

               

              There is severe shortage of published (in notable peer-reviewed journals)professors in Nigeria in many disciplines at the moment. 

               

              The argument of need versus establishment should first take resources into consideration. 

               

              Quality should be paramount before quantity. 

               

              Segun


              On Feb 25, 2013, at 4:51 PM, "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jbi8@...> wrote:

               

              Ladies and gentlemen,

              Permit me to observe that there several counter-intuitive conclusions drawn by Dr Ben Aduba in this write-up on whether Nigeria needs more universities. First, if Nigeria has the population, university-population density ratio, and the potential for universities to serve as the nuclei for economic development, how on earth would one frown against more universities in a nation where the universities can’t even absorb 10 percent of the QUALIFIED applicants applying? The better tenable argument would have been how to cope with the admissions. In fact, the few universities in Nigeria to serve the overwhelming population of QUALIFIED candidate led to the mass exodus of Nigerian students to overseas in the 70s and 80s! FACT!! I went into UNN in the mid-70s when there were just 6 universities in Nigeria; and a number of qualified students had to go overseas if they could afford it or just settle for working careers at the time.

              Secondly, it is inconceivable that one can conclude that more universities wont train more students in a geographical region where distant and opportunities and awareness can make the difference in people’s lives. There are people that have been greatly influenced to pursue further studies because of the influence of the educational institutions around them. FACT! Perhaps if we followed Dr Aduba’s logic, somebody could have made the argument in 1960 that Nigeria didn’t need more universities, such that we could have focused on EXPANDING University of Ibadan, even if the campus took over the entire of Ibadan, or even if people had to travel all the way from the NE, NC, NE, SE, East, SS, etc; thus, there could have been no need to establish UNN, ABU, UNIBEN, UNICAL, UNILORIN, UNIMAID, UNIJOS, UNILAG, UNIFE etc. Better still, Dr Aduba’s arguments would suggest that the citing of the Ibadan campus of London University in 1948 was unnecessary during the colonial era  because London University could have been expanded to accommodate any “qualified” Nigerian trying to attend a university; however, it is a FACT that the citing of UI in Nigeria INFLUENCED a number of Nigerians and afforded the opportunity to attend a university. This is also  why cities have more schools to serve their population. As I said previously,  if Nigeria was to wait until every Secondary School was of Fed Govt College standard before allowing St Peter's College Agenebode to be established, several of us would've had very rough path to education…..distance to Benin City/Ibadan, influence of the institution on the people and environment etc; or if Ogbemudia had listened to the naysayers complaining about the educational standard in converting Midwest institute to Uniben, think of how Edo and Delta people could have had the level of access to education that Uniben afforded and the fact that Uniben may rank higher than some older universities today. So  Nigeria needs more higher institutions at all loongus and corners of the nation! The return on a university education is immeasurable, regardless of the standard. FACT!!!

              The resource factor to maintain a university up to an acceptable educational standard is an IMPORTANT element in Dr Aduba’s analysis; however, I am quickly reminded of the pertinent words of a famous West African Poet, JP Clark who said: the water in the Calabash vices with the mighty Volta; as we all know, as you have the Harvard, Preston, MIT, Yale, Stanford and the Ivy League schools in USA, so you have the Univ of the District of Columbia in Wash DC and the Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas or FL Memorial College in Miami, Florida. There are Community Colleges as well! If America was to wait until they had all universities at the standard of Harvard before building the Communities Colleges and other Low and Moderate universities, or continue to EXPAND the Ivy Leagues to accommodate more students, there wont be CUNY, Howard University, Southwestern Univ etc etc. Besides, from the several universities established in the society there shall emerge the cremes, the ivy leagues and Harvards of Nigeria in near or distant future. And as Dr Ola Kassim and JUI observed previously, most educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potential”, not what is “given or immediately seen” in real terms because things can fall apart or grow into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of initiation of human development concepts like Education. Nigeria needs more universities! Take care. JU Igietseme

               

              From: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@... [mailto:nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...] On Behalf Of msabubakar@...
              Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 6:19 PM
              To: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...
              Subject: Re: [nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists] Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities

               

                On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 2:45 PM, Baduba54 <baduba54@...> wrote:
               
              DOES NIGERIA NEED MORE UNIVERSITIES?
              If one uses the population metric as a factor in deciding if more universities are needed in Nigeria (140 million at the last count) the answer is “yes”. If one uses demand (young people who want to attend universities) the answer again is “yes”. If the standard is the ratio in educated nations (number of universities per a population size), one still comes to the “yes” answer. What about the potential for economic development metric? The answer does not change. It is “yes” once more. But despite the overwhelming “yes” answers above, I say that Nigeria does not need more universities, not now. And here are my reasons.
              Nigeria cannot afford more universities.  Sometime ago just after Mr. Bolaji Aluko moved to Otuoke to found the Federal University of Otuoke a commentator alleged that the university would receive N2 billion (or something like that). The founding VC Aluko denied the amount implying that the amount was overstated. He never gave the actual allocation. I am going to assume that the actual vote was ten times that (about N20 billion). Even so we are talking about only $130 million to start a university. Mr. Aluko would agree that $130m would be about the size of the operating budget of his former university’s department of chemical engineering. Note that I wrote chemical engineering not the entire engineering department. Chemical engineering is just a fraction of the engineering department. Note also that I said operating budget. New building structures would not be part of this $130m. And Howard isn’t Harvard or MIT.
              It should be obvious that $130m to start a university is a huge joke. If one wants to start a university from scratch we must be thinking in terms of $1 billion. Nigeria cannot afford to build more universities at this time even if the population is twice 140 million.
               
              The number of universities does not necessarily mean that more students would be educated, nor does it imply that it is the most efficient way to educate more students. I am merely using FUO to illustrate my point because this institution is the best known of the other 9 institutions started a few years ago and any body could use any other one as substitute. FUO in its first year admitted 200 students in 8 departments for an average of 25 students per department. This number of additional students could have been absorbed in the existing university without one additional naira for a savings of N2-20 billion.
              I agree that the new facilities would eventually admit more students with a mere fraction of additional revenue. But that is why I say we do not need new universities now.
               
              Nigeria does not have university ready streams of students. For support for this position read again the stories about what is happening at Kaduna state school system. Schools academic faculty members could not pass exam set for 4th grade students. If faculty members who have (supposedly) already received the full education regime were not ready for beyond the 4th grade imagine the standards for the WASC holders applying to universities. It is hard to assume that this situation is peculiar to just Kaduna state. What if all northern states’ school systems is this way? What if the story is true of all Nigerian school systems? I think that instead of building more universities the available resources should be devoted to improving the quality of primary and high schools first.
              Imagine what an Aluko could do with $130 million if he were to use it to start a quality High School. It will be a match to or even better than what his old high school was like when he attended it. Those graduates would be ready for university education just as Mr. Aluko and his classmates were. Nigerians who came to North America or Europe in the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s with WASC sailed through college (any caliber of college) with flying colors. And most of them went to top schools and some worked full time while doing so.
               
              Jobs requiring college level education are not available in enough numbers for university graduates. Available jobs in agriculture, transportation, craft centers, etc do not require college education. Why waist tens of thousands of naira to educate a person for a job that a good high school education would be enough for? Why not build trade or technical schools instead? See what Peter Enahoro (Peter Pan) and his brother Tony Enahoro did with a good school certificate! They wrote more books and papers then many university graduates have read.
               
              The bottom line is we do not need more universities now. Let us stop building high schools and calling them universities.
               
              Benjamin Obiajulu Aduba
              Boston, Massachusetts
              February 25, 2013

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            • topcrest topcrest
              ..We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily Oga Val Do Yorubas provoke those who are younger than them unnecessarily?  Joe
              Message 6 of 27 , Feb 28, 2013
                '..We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily

                Oga Val
                Do Yorubas provoke those who are younger than them unnecessarily? 

                Joe

                From: Valentine Ojo <elewuoye@...>
                To: Nigerian ID <nigerianid@yahoogroups.com>
                Cc: Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...>; "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jigietseme@...>; Ola Kassim <olakassimmd@...>; Chukwuma S. Agwunobi <agwu22@...>; Adeniba Adepoyigi <adenibaadepoyigi@...>; Amauche Ude <udeamauche@...>; Anthony Momah <azkk@...>; Emeka Ugwuonye <emekaugwuonye@...>; Iyalaje <ogban_ulisa@...>; Olushola Fashedemi <ofashedemi@...>; Pius Adesanmi <piusadesanmi@...>; Prince Dickson <pcdbooks@...>; Rufus Orindare <batokkinc@...>; Salihu Mustafa <salihumustafa@...>; Samuel Ayodele <enugbua@...>; Suji Kolawole <sujikolawole@...>; Sylvester Idehen <idehen559@...>; Tajudeen Raji <traji@...>; wale ojo lanre <waleojolanre@...>; Yakubu Usman <yakubu.usman@...>
                Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 11:09 PM
                Subject: NigerianID | We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily

                 
                Omowunmi Iledare: 

                I accept your apology.

                If Joe Igietseme is your friend, then talk to him:

                We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily - we respect our elders as opposed to some uncultured ethnic groups I would rather not name!

                Take care!


                On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 5:14 PM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:
                Sorry I did not see that.  There is no need for that either.  Let us not pay evil with evil
                 
                Wumi
                 
                 
                From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
                Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 2:07 PM
                To: Nigerian ID
                Cc: Omowunmi Iledare; Qansy Salako; Joseph Igietseme; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman

                Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                 
                Really..?
                 
                But this is good to describe a colleague..
                 
                ''Dr. Ojo' 'is a man without academic credentials either in the third or first world; Ojo couldn't even make headways at Unife as a lecturer and was weeded out of academia in Nigeria; he came to the United States (America will graciously accommodate all sorts of people) and still couldn't make it in academia at the university, college or Community levels; even as a Regular High School teacher/academic level, he still couldn't make it; he finally settled for a Substitute teacher's position in which he is usually escorted by Security or Cops into class''...? - Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...
                 
                 
                On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 2:12 PM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:
                That is Joe Igietseme and his porous thinking faculty for you! Val, I am sure this is not a good phrase to describe a colleague, right?
                 
                PWI
                 
                 
                From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
                Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 1:03 PM
                To: Omowunmi Iledare; DIASPORA GROUP
                Cc: QS; DIASPORA GROUP; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; <NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com>; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman

                Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                 
                And who is calling whom any names...?


                Sent from my iPad

                On Feb 27, 2013, at 10:49 AM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:
                Let us not call each other names as we discussed and deliberate on how to move Naija forward!  One road does not usually lead to the market.  We just need to find the optimal path at a given time.
                 
                Stay blessed!
                 
                PWI
                 
                 
                 
                From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
                Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 9:16 AM
                To: QS; DIASPORA GROUP
                Cc: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; <NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com>; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Omowunmi Iledare
                Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                 
                That is Joe Igietseme and his porous thinking faculty for you!
                 
                These are the people aspiring to show the way for other Nigerians to follow!
                 
                Igietseme is the model Nigerian who has arrived, and who has finally made it in the great USA - according to Dr. Ola Kassim!


                Sent from my iPad

                On Feb 27, 2013, at 8:38 AM, "QS" <kanzi@...> wrote:
                My goodness, Joe, you actually believe in these things you say!
                Sermons on HOPE make putative logic and you don’t seem to be applying it that well.
                You may want to round the edges of your thoughts on HOPE with the following additional premises.
                 
                From the individual standpoint, HOPE for a successful life based on indisciplined and wayward lifestyle is an evidence of bipolar disorder with that person.
                 
                From the country standpoint, HOPE for advancement and people emancipation from unimaginative policies based on whims and caprices of its leadership is logically and intellectually indefensible. It is grand illusion.
                Your welcome.
                QS
                From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
                Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 10:33 PM
                To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
                Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                 
                QS,
                Hope is the foundation of courage and aspiration. Without hope there will be no effort, planning and expectations. We must keep hope alive!!! The hope that there will be a better tmrw despite all the odds; that if we try more and go the extra mile, our children’s generation will do better than us and posterity will smile at us; that is what keeps the human society going from generation to generation, making him beat the odds facing him, surprise himself, aspire, apply himself and achieve extraordinary dreams. Some people may argue that hope is everything! When hope is lost, the very lingering brick and fiber that hold human life and society may just give way. We can’t lose hope; that’s what no ruler or mis-ruler can take from us! Take care. JUI
                 
                From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
                Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:10 PM
                To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
                Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                 
                “HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!!” Joe Igietseme
                 
                HOPE ehn?.......Joe, you are a cheater.
                Why you nor tell me say na HOPE we been dey halla over, since? Kai…wuru wuru man.
                Well, HOPE will trump reality any day.
                Under HOPE, UNN will soon break out and Yahoo universities make infinite wisdom.
                For sure, if all the problems in our education sector that we see with our koro-koro eyes can be reduced to HOPE, then nothing to resolve and this brainstorming session has become moot.
                Ten years in the life of a nation is nothing, so let’s see where we are in 10 years.
                Best wishes all.
                QS
                 
                From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
                Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:22 PM
                To: QS; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
                Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                 
                “”””””””Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country. ………………..In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized….What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.
                Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment. Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office. ……………….Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles. ”””””””Unquote QS!
                Hmmmmm! And the universities are not yelling everyday? Sounds really SPOOKY!!! Obviously if our assumptions and the premises for our statements are unrealistic in Nigeria, then the expected natural transition, evolution and progress in the education sector we predict will come to naught! However, let’s HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!! Take care. JUI
                 
                From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
                Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:01 PM
                To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
                Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                 
                Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country.
                What you are describing is not practical in our Nigeria as it’s been run and managed from time Imo river.
                In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized.
                 
                What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.
                Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment.
                 
                Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office.
                FUTUOKE will be lucky to have the same level of funding once the infinitely wise Jonathan leaves As Rock.
                 
                This is one of the reasons none of our universities today has a decent library of global standard or collection of reference books/sources for teaching or research.
                Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles.
                Be good.
                QS
                From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
                Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:11 AM
                To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; Nigerian Observer group; YanArewa@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                 
                QS,
                It is likely that the natural evolution of these universities will culminate in the categorization you have elegantly described; that is, the socioeconomic realities and political events in the country will shape the universities into “a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of: [first, the] ….. technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained; [second, the] good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics; and [three] about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained.”
                I agree with you that “Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.”” However, we MUST allow these universities to be established first and each one will find its lever; it will ONLY a policy revision in the education sector to distill the institutions into their respective categories. It is easier to have the universities available to find their categories than to build a university to fit a particular category; this is the realistic history educational development in most developing societies; even developed societies started on that mode and course.
                As we said previously, human development concepts like Educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potentials, aspirations or ideals”, that are not necessarily based on what is “immediately seen” in real terms because those things evolve into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of their initiation! Take care. JUI  
                 
                From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
                Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:39 AM
                To: 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'
                Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                 
                Even if one humors the “intuitive” way that Igietseme and Kassim are viewing our thoughtless national education policy as articulated below, one would still not come away persuaded on how 53 years later, no university in Nigeria has broken out into a real center of reputable learning.
                Fifty years ought to be enough for any university to grow, or at least reveal, its potential!
                Instead, all of our original universities have been going backward in quality and relevance, not forward.
                 
                You just don’t create national universities for the sole purpose of mopping up high school leavers who are seeking admissions. That is called government of the day by day. You don’t run a country like that.  
                You’d be lucky if you ended up with products who could read well. Not the way to breed thinkers.
                At the worst, you could have a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of adequate supply of technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained, good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics and about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained. Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.
                 
                We can continue to deceive ourselves with more self-destruct analyses all we want over the next 50 years.
                Regardless of how we slice it, there is no reason for all the 110+ so-called universities that we have in Nigeria to be at the level of 2-year junior/community college in quality, 53 years after independence and trillion dollars in revenue.
                Absolutely no justification.
                QS
                From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
                Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 11:40 PM
                To: Nigerian ID
                Cc: Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Qansy Salako
                Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities
                 
                Which Nigerian university - old or new - has any serious library...?
                 
                And I am talking from personal experience!
                 
                Most of them cannot even afford to subscribe to Nigerian daily newspapers!
                 
                Please quote me!
                 
                On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 11:12 PM, Segun T. Dawodu <stdawodu@...> wrote:
                 
                There is a critical part of the argument that is being lost. 
                 
                You can not create funds for NEW university while existing ones are being seriously under-funded. 
                It is like snuffing out the old university and hope the new one will take over. University of London was never under-funded to create UI neither were the 6 old universities to create the next generation. 
                 
                What we are seeing is lack of funding for old universities while new ones are given billions. Also we're are the professors going to come from?
                 
                There is severe shortage of published (in notable peer-reviewed journals)professors in Nigeria in many disciplines at the moment. 
                 
                The argument of need versus establishment should first take resources into consideration. 
                 
                Quality should be paramount before quantity. 
                 
                Segun

                On Feb 25, 2013, at 4:51 PM, "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jbi8@...> wrote:
                 
                Ladies and gentlemen,
                Permit me to observe that there several counter-intuitive conclusions drawn by Dr Ben Aduba in this write-up on whether Nigeria needs more universities. First, if Nigeria has the population, university-population density ratio, and the potential for universities to serve as the nuclei for economic development, how on earth would one frown against more universities in a nation where the universities can’t even absorb 10 percent of the QUALIFIED applicants applying? The better tenable argument would have been how to cope with the admissions. In fact, the few universities in Nigeria to serve the overwhelming population of QUALIFIED candidate led to the mass exodus of Nigerian students to overseas in the 70s and 80s! FACT!! I went into UNN in the mid-70s when there were just 6 universities in Nigeria; and a number of qualified students had to go overseas if they could afford it or just settle for working careers at the time.
                Secondly, it is inconceivable that one can conclude that more universities wont train more students in a geographical region where distant and opportunities and awareness can make the difference in people’s lives. There are people that have been greatly influenced to pursue further studies because of the influence of the educational institutions around them. FACT! Perhaps if we followed Dr Aduba’s logic, somebody could have made the argument in 1960 that Nigeria didn’t need more universities, such that we could have focused on EXPANDING University of Ibadan, even if the campus took over the entire of Ibadan, or even if people had to travel all the way from the NE, NC, NE, SE, East, SS, etc; thus, there could have been no need to establish UNN, ABU, UNIBEN, UNICAL, UNILORIN, UNIMAID, UNIJOS, UNILAG, UNIFE etc. Better still, Dr Aduba’s arguments would suggest that the citing of the Ibadan campus of London University in 1948 was unnecessary during the colonial era  because London University could have been expanded to accommodate any “qualified” Nigerian trying to attend a university; however, it is a FACT that the citing of UI in Nigeria INFLUENCED a number of Nigerians and afforded the opportunity to attend a university. This is also  why cities have more schools to serve their population. As I said previously,  if Nigeria was to wait until every Secondary School was of Fed Govt College standard before allowing St Peter's College Agenebode to be established, several of us would've had very rough path to education…..distance to Benin City/Ibadan, influence of the institution on the people and environment etc; or if Ogbemudia had listened to the naysayers complaining about the educational standard in converting Midwest institute to Uniben, think of how Edo and Delta people could have had the level of access to education that Uniben afforded and the fact that Uniben may rank higher than some older universities today. So  Nigeria needs more higher institutions at all loongus and corners of the nation! The return on a university education is immeasurable, regardless of the standard. FACT!!!
                The resource factor to maintain a university up to an acceptable educational standard is an IMPORTANT element in Dr Aduba’s analysis; however, I am quickly reminded of the pertinent words of a famous West African Poet, JP Clark who said: the water in the Calabash vices with the mighty Volta; as we all know, as you have the Harvard, Preston, MIT, Yale, Stanford and the Ivy League schools in USA, so you have the Univ of the District of Columbia in Wash DC and the Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas or FL Memorial College in Miami, Florida. There are Community Colleges as well! If America was to wait until they had all universities at the standard of Harvard before building the Communities Colleges and other Low and Moderate universities, or continue to EXPAND the Ivy Leagues to accommodate more students, there wont be CUNY, Howard University, Southwestern Univ etc etc. Besides, from the several universities established in the society there shall emerge the cremes, the ivy leagues and Harvards of Nigeria in near or distant future. And as Dr Ola Kassim and JUI observed previously, most educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potential”, not what is “given or immediately seen” in real terms because things can fall apart or grow into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of initiation of human development concepts like Education. Nigeria needs more universities! Take care. JU Igietseme
                 
                From: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@... [mailto:nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...] On Behalf Of msabubakar@...
                Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 6:19 PM
                To: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...
                Subject: Re: [nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists] Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities
                 
                  On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 2:45 PM, Baduba54 <baduba54@...> wrote:
                 
                DOES NIGERIA NEED MORE UNIVERSITIES?
                If one uses the population metric as a factor in deciding if more universities are needed in Nigeria (140 million at the last count) the answer is “yes”. If one uses demand (young people who want to attend universities) the answer again is “yes”. If the standard is the ratio in educated nations (number of universities per a population size), one still comes to the “yes” answer. What about the potential for economic development metric? The answer does not change. It is “yes” once more. But despite the overwhelming “yes” answers above, I say that Nigeria does not need more universities, not now. And here are my reasons.
                Nigeria cannot afford more universities.  Sometime ago just after Mr. Bolaji Aluko moved to Otuoke to found the Federal University of Otuoke a commentator alleged that the university would receive N2 billion (or something like that). The founding VC Aluko denied the amount implying that the amount was overstated. He never gave the actual allocation. I am going to assume that the actual vote was ten times that (about N20 billion). Even so we are talking about only $130 million to start a university. Mr. Aluko would agree that $130m would be about the size of the operating budget of his former university’s department of chemical engineering. Note that I wrote chemical engineering not the entire engineering department. Chemical engineering is just a fraction of the engineering department. Note also that I said operating budget. New building structures would not be part of this $130m. And Howard isn’t Harvard or MIT.
                It should be obvious that $130m to start a university is a huge joke. If one wants to start a university from scratch we must be thinking in terms of $1 billion. Nigeria cannot afford to build more universities at this time even if the population is twice 140 million.
                 
                The number of universities does not necessarily mean that more students would be educated, nor does it imply that it is the most efficient way to educate more students. I am merely using FUO to illustrate my point because this institution is the best known of the other 9 institutions started a few years ago and any body could use any other one as substitute. FUO in its first year admitted 200 students in 8 departments for an average of 25 students per department. This number of additional students could have been absorbed in the existing university without one additional naira for a savings of N2-20 billion.
                I agree that the new facilities would eventually admit more students with a mere fraction of additional revenue. But that is why I say we do not need new universities now.
                 
                Nigeria does not have university ready streams of students. For support for this position read again the stories about what is happening at Kaduna state school system. Schools academic faculty members could not pass exam set for 4th grade students. If faculty members who have (supposedly) already received the full education regime were not ready for beyond the 4th grade imagine the standards for the WASC holders applying to universities. It is hard to assume that this situation is peculiar to just Kaduna state. What if all northern states’ school systems is this way? What if the story is true of all Nigerian school systems? I think that instead of building more universities the available resources should be devoted to improving the quality of primary and high schools first.
                Imagine what an Aluko could do with $130 million if he were to use it to start a quality High School. It will be a match to or even better than what his old high school was like when he attended it. Those graduates would be ready for university education just as Mr. Aluko and his classmates were. Nigerians who came to North America or Europe in the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s with WASC sailed through college (any caliber of college) with flying colors. And most of them went to top schools and some worked full time while doing so.
                 
                Jobs requiring college level education are not available in enough numbers for university graduates. Available jobs in agriculture, transportation, craft centers, etc do not require college education. Why waist tens of thousands of naira to educate a person for a job that a good high school education would be enough for? Why not build trade or technical schools instead? See what Peter Enahoro (Peter Pan) and his brother Tony Enahoro did with a good school certificate! They wrote more books and papers then many university graduates have read.
                 
                The bottom line is we do not need more universities now. Let us stop building high schools and calling them universities.
                 
                Benjamin Obiajulu Aduba
                Boston, Massachusetts
                February 25, 2013
                Sent by DiGi from my BlackBerry® Smartphone

                From: Kabiru Kalgo <kabirukalgo@...>


                 
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              • Kunle Adegboye
                Good question. Oya, Mr. Valentine Ojo, make u answer that one. Have a good day.   Kunle Adegboye www.a-speedwireless.com The Wireless Superstore ... leaves
                Message 7 of 27 , Feb 28, 2013
                  Good question. Oya, Mr. Valentine Ojo, make u answer that one.

                  Have a good day.
                   
                  Kunle Adegboye
                  www.a-speedwireless.com
                  The Wireless Superstore

                  From: topcrest topcrest <topcrestt@...>
                  To: Valentine Ojo <elewuoye@...>; Nigerian ID <nigerianid@yahoogroups.com>; "N Igerian World Forum@yahoogroups.com" <NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com>
                  Cc: Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...>; "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jigietseme@...>; Ola Kassim <olakassimmd@...>; Chukwuma S. Agwunobi <agwu22@...>; Adeniba Adepoyigi <adenibaadepoyigi@...>; Amauche Ude <udeamauche@...>; Anthony Momah <azkk@...>; Emeka Ugwuonye <emekaugwuonye@...>; Iyalaje <ogban_ulisa@...>; Olushola Fashedemi <ofashedemi@...>; Pius Adesanmi <piusadesanmi@...>; Prince Dickson <pcdbooks@...>; Rufus Orindare <batokkinc@...>; Salihu Mustafa <salihumustafa@...>; Samuel Ayodele <enugbua@...>; Suji Kolawole <sujikolawole@...>; Sylvester Idehen <idehen559@...>; Tajudeen Raji <traji@...>; wale ojo lanre <waleojolanre@...>; Yakubu Usman <yakubu.usman@...>
                  Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2013 6:22 AM
                  Subject: [NIgerianWorldForum] Re: NigerianID | We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily

                   
                  '..We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily

                  Oga Val
                  Do Yorubas provoke those who are younger than them unnecessarily? 

                  Joe

                  From: Valentine Ojo <elewuoye@...>
                  To: Nigerian ID <nigerianid@yahoogroups.com>
                  Cc: Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...>; "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jigietseme@...>; Ola Kassim <olakassimmd@...>; Chukwuma S. Agwunobi <agwu22@...>; Adeniba Adepoyigi <adenibaadepoyigi@...>; Amauche Ude <udeamauche@...>; Anthony Momah <azkk@...>; Emeka Ugwuonye <emekaugwuonye@...>; Iyalaje <ogban_ulisa@...>; Olushola Fashedemi <ofashedemi@...>; Pius Adesanmi <piusadesanmi@...>; Prince Dickson <pcdbooks@...>; Rufus Orindare <batokkinc@...>; Salihu Mustafa <salihumustafa@...>; Samuel Ayodele <enugbua@...>; Suji Kolawole <sujikolawole@...>; Sylvester Idehen <idehen559@...>; Tajudeen Raji <traji@...>; wale ojo lanre <waleojolanre@...>; Yakubu Usman <yakubu.usman@...>
                  Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 11:09 PM
                  Subject: NigerianID | We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily

                   
                  Omowunmi Iledare: 

                  I accept your apology.

                  If Joe Igietseme is your friend, then talk to him:

                  We Yoruba do not provoke those who are older than us unnecessarily - we respect our elders as opposed to some uncultured ethnic groups I would rather not name!

                  Take care!


                  On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 5:14 PM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:
                  Sorry I did not see that.  There is no need for that either.  Let us not pay evil with evil
                   
                  Wumi
                   
                   
                  From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
                  Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 2:07 PM
                  To: Nigerian ID
                  Cc: Omowunmi Iledare; Qansy Salako; Joseph Igietseme; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman

                  Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                   
                  Really..?
                   
                  But this is good to describe a colleague..
                   
                  ''Dr. Ojo' 'is a man without academic credentials either in the third or first world; Ojo couldn't even make headways at Unife as a lecturer and was weeded out of academia in Nigeria; he came to the United States (America will graciously accommodate all sorts of people) and still couldn't make it in academia at the university, college or Community levels; even as a Regular High School teacher/academic level, he still couldn't make it; he finally settled for a Substitute teacher's position in which he is usually escorted by Security or Cops into class''...? - Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...
                   
                   
                  On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 2:12 PM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:
                  That is Joe Igietseme and his porous thinking faculty for you! Val, I am sure this is not a good phrase to describe a colleague, right?
                   
                  PWI
                   
                   
                  From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
                  Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 1:03 PM
                  To: Omowunmi Iledare; DIASPORA GROUP
                  Cc: QS; DIASPORA GROUP; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; <NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com>; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman

                  Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                   
                  And who is calling whom any names...?


                  Sent from my iPad

                  On Feb 27, 2013, at 10:49 AM, Omowunmi Iledare <wumi@...> wrote:
                  Let us not call each other names as we discussed and deliberate on how to move Naija forward!  One road does not usually lead to the market.  We just need to find the optimal path at a given time.
                   
                  Stay blessed!
                   
                  PWI
                   
                   
                   
                  From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
                  Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 9:16 AM
                  To: QS; DIASPORA GROUP
                  Cc: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; <NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com>; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Omowunmi Iledare
                  Subject: Re: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                   
                  That is Joe Igietseme and his porous thinking faculty for you!
                   
                  These are the people aspiring to show the way for other Nigerians to follow!
                   
                  Igietseme is the model Nigerian who has arrived, and who has finally made it in the great USA - according to Dr. Ola Kassim!


                  Sent from my iPad

                  On Feb 27, 2013, at 8:38 AM, "QS" <kanzi@...> wrote:
                  My goodness, Joe, you actually believe in these things you say!
                  Sermons on HOPE make putative logic and you don’t seem to be applying it that well.
                  You may want to round the edges of your thoughts on HOPE with the following additional premises.
                   
                  From the individual standpoint, HOPE for a successful life based on indisciplined and wayward lifestyle is an evidence of bipolar disorder with that person.
                   
                  From the country standpoint, HOPE for advancement and people emancipation from unimaginative policies based on whims and caprices of its leadership is logically and intellectually indefensible. It is grand illusion.
                  Your welcome.
                  QS
                  From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
                  Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 10:33 PM
                  To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
                  Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                   
                  QS,
                  Hope is the foundation of courage and aspiration. Without hope there will be no effort, planning and expectations. We must keep hope alive!!! The hope that there will be a better tmrw despite all the odds; that if we try more and go the extra mile, our children’s generation will do better than us and posterity will smile at us; that is what keeps the human society going from generation to generation, making him beat the odds facing him, surprise himself, aspire, apply himself and achieve extraordinary dreams. Some people may argue that hope is everything! When hope is lost, the very lingering brick and fiber that hold human life and society may just give way. We can’t lose hope; that’s what no ruler or mis-ruler can take from us! Take care. JUI
                   
                  From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
                  Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:10 PM
                  To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
                  Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                   
                  “HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!!” Joe Igietseme
                   
                  HOPE ehn?.......Joe, you are a cheater.
                  Why you nor tell me say na HOPE we been dey halla over, since? Kai…wuru wuru man.
                  Well, HOPE will trump reality any day.
                  Under HOPE, UNN will soon break out and Yahoo universities make infinite wisdom.
                  For sure, if all the problems in our education sector that we see with our koro-koro eyes can be reduced to HOPE, then nothing to resolve and this brainstorming session has become moot.
                  Ten years in the life of a nation is nothing, so let’s see where we are in 10 years.
                  Best wishes all.
                  QS
                   
                  From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
                  Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:22 PM
                  To: QS; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
                  Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                   
                  “”””””””Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country. ………………..In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized….What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.
                  Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment. Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office. ……………….Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles. ”””””””Unquote QS!
                  Hmmmmm! And the universities are not yelling everyday? Sounds really SPOOKY!!! Obviously if our assumptions and the premises for our statements are unrealistic in Nigeria, then the expected natural transition, evolution and progress in the education sector we predict will come to naught! However, let’s HOPE its not so; not as hopeless as you presented the situation. In fact, my recent experience at UNN when I visited Nigeria from Nov through December 2012 was quite encouraging in infrastructures, capacity building and the administrative will to perform despite the challenges. Let’s keep hope alive!!! Take care. JUI
                   
                  From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
                  Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:01 PM
                  To: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; wumi@...
                  Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                   
                  Joe, you guys would be logical in a normal and functioning country.
                  What you are describing is not practical in our Nigeria as it’s been run and managed from time Imo river.
                  In a normal environment like in “most developing societies” (your words), all the universities would be entitled to and receive their respective funds, same opportunities and infrastructures regularly and reliably. They would be operating in a level playing field that makes the race to excel excitingly competitive, healthy and detribalized.
                   
                  What we have in our country is a funding structure that is as capricious as it is thoughtless.
                  Semi-illiterate leadership cabal is determining our national literacy goal according to how much educational opportunities they have got. The result is a chaotic education funding culture that is based on who the incumbent president is, where the university is located and who supported the head of state during a coup or did not vote for the president at the election. Universities can’t find their true level in this kind of environment.
                   
                  Funding of universities often takes less priorities when our kleptomaniac government needs more budgetary capital allocation for looting or to build up GDP reserve that means more loans from their creditors but nothing to the citizens. Budgeted funds to existing institutions often get cut or unpaid when new sink-hole universities are added solely (as you stated) to increase university admissions, only for the new Yahoo universities themselves to become burdens on their state resources after the founding president leaves office.
                  FUTUOKE will be lucky to have the same level of funding once the infinitely wise Jonathan leaves As Rock.
                   
                  This is one of the reasons none of our universities today has a decent library of global standard or collection of reference books/sources for teaching or research.
                  Joe, Nigeria defies conventional logic. Using contemporary lens to view our country is grossly defective, inapplicable and inaccurate. It is like using a ruler to measure miles.
                  Be good.
                  QS
                  From: Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID) [mailto:jbi8@...]
                  Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:11 AM
                  To: 'QS'; 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; Nigerian Observer group; YanArewa@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                   
                  QS,
                  It is likely that the natural evolution of these universities will culminate in the categorization you have elegantly described; that is, the socioeconomic realities and political events in the country will shape the universities into “a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of: [first, the] ….. technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained; [second, the] good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics; and [three] about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained.”
                  I agree with you that “Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.”” However, we MUST allow these universities to be established first and each one will find its lever; it will ONLY a policy revision in the education sector to distill the institutions into their respective categories. It is easier to have the universities available to find their categories than to build a university to fit a particular category; this is the realistic history educational development in most developing societies; even developed societies started on that mode and course.
                  As we said previously, human development concepts like Educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potentials, aspirations or ideals”, that are not necessarily based on what is “immediately seen” in real terms because those things evolve into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of their initiation! Take care. JUI  
                   
                  From: QS [mailto:kanzi@...]
                  Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 8:39 AM
                  To: 'Valentine Ojo'; 'Segun T. Dawodu'; 'Benjamin Aduba'; 'Joe Attueyi'; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); 'Mobolaji ALUKO'; 'dAme jOo'; 'Binta Suleiman Gaya'; 'Tunji Timi Tola'; 'Adeniba Adepoyigi'; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc: 'Adeniran Adeboye'; 'Amauche Ude'; 'Anthony Momah'; 'Emeka Ugwuonye'; 'Iyalaje'; 'Ola Kassim'; 'Olushola Fashedemi'; 'Pius Adesanmi'; 'Prince Dickson'; 'Rufus Orindare'; 'Salihu Mustafa'; 'Samuel Ayodele'; 'Suji Kolawole'; 'Sylvester Idehen'; 'Tajudeen Raji'; 'wale ojo lanre'; 'Yakubu Usman'
                  Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG's nine new varsities
                   
                  Even if one humors the “intuitive” way that Igietseme and Kassim are viewing our thoughtless national education policy as articulated below, one would still not come away persuaded on how 53 years later, no university in Nigeria has broken out into a real center of reputable learning.
                  Fifty years ought to be enough for any university to grow, or at least reveal, its potential!
                  Instead, all of our original universities have been going backward in quality and relevance, not forward.
                   
                  You just don’t create national universities for the sole purpose of mopping up high school leavers who are seeking admissions. That is called government of the day by day. You don’t run a country like that.  
                  You’d be lucky if you ended up with products who could read well. Not the way to breed thinkers.
                  At the worst, you could have a 3-tier tertiary educational system comprising of adequate supply of technical/vocational schools where essential services, trades and occupations are trained, good 2/4-year community colleges for general academics and about half a dozen excellent citadels where leaders are trained. Such a system can satisfy the demands for higher education by secondary school graduates, and it is cheaper, more effective and more relevant to today’s reality.
                   
                  We can continue to deceive ourselves with more self-destruct analyses all we want over the next 50 years.
                  Regardless of how we slice it, there is no reason for all the 110+ so-called universities that we have in Nigeria to be at the level of 2-year junior/community college in quality, 53 years after independence and trillion dollars in revenue.
                  Absolutely no justification.
                  QS
                  From: Valentine Ojo [mailto:elewuoye@...]
                  Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 11:40 PM
                  To: Nigerian ID
                  Cc: Segun T. Dawodu; Benjamin Aduba; Joe Attueyi; Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID); Mobolaji ALUKO; dAme jOo; Binta Suleiman Gaya; Tunji Timi Tola; Adeniba Adepoyigi; Adeniran Adeboye; Amauche Ude; Anthony Momah; Emeka Ugwuonye; Iyalaje; Ola Kassim; Olushola Fashedemi; Pius Adesanmi; Prince Dickson; Rufus Orindare; Salihu Mustafa; Samuel Ayodele; Suji Kolawole; Sylvester Idehen; Tajudeen Raji; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; Qansy Salako
                  Subject: RE: Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities
                   
                  Which Nigerian university - old or new - has any serious library...?
                   
                  And I am talking from personal experience!
                   
                  Most of them cannot even afford to subscribe to Nigerian daily newspapers!
                   
                  Please quote me!
                   
                  On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 11:12 PM, Segun T. Dawodu <stdawodu@...> wrote:
                   
                  There is a critical part of the argument that is being lost. 
                   
                  You can not create funds for NEW university while existing ones are being seriously under-funded. 
                  It is like snuffing out the old university and hope the new one will take over. University of London was never under-funded to create UI neither were the 6 old universities to create the next generation. 
                   
                  What we are seeing is lack of funding for old universities while new ones are given billions. Also we're are the professors going to come from?
                   
                  There is severe shortage of published (in notable peer-reviewed journals)professors in Nigeria in many disciplines at the moment. 
                   
                  The argument of need versus establishment should first take resources into consideration. 
                   
                  Quality should be paramount before quantity. 
                   
                  Segun

                  On Feb 25, 2013, at 4:51 PM, "Igietseme, Joseph (CDC/OID/NCEZID)" <jbi8@...> wrote:
                   
                  Ladies and gentlemen,
                  Permit me to observe that there several counter-intuitive conclusions drawn by Dr Ben Aduba in this write-up on whether Nigeria needs more universities. First, if Nigeria has the population, university-population density ratio, and the potential for universities to serve as the nuclei for economic development, how on earth would one frown against more universities in a nation where the universities can’t even absorb 10 percent of the QUALIFIED applicants applying? The better tenable argument would have been how to cope with the admissions. In fact, the few universities in Nigeria to serve the overwhelming population of QUALIFIED candidate led to the mass exodus of Nigerian students to overseas in the 70s and 80s! FACT!! I went into UNN in the mid-70s when there were just 6 universities in Nigeria; and a number of qualified students had to go overseas if they could afford it or just settle for working careers at the time.
                  Secondly, it is inconceivable that one can conclude that more universities wont train more students in a geographical region where distant and opportunities and awareness can make the difference in people’s lives. There are people that have been greatly influenced to pursue further studies because of the influence of the educational institutions around them. FACT! Perhaps if we followed Dr Aduba’s logic, somebody could have made the argument in 1960 that Nigeria didn’t need more universities, such that we could have focused on EXPANDING University of Ibadan, even if the campus took over the entire of Ibadan, or even if people had to travel all the way from the NE, NC, NE, SE, East, SS, etc; thus, there could have been no need to establish UNN, ABU, UNIBEN, UNICAL, UNILORIN, UNIMAID, UNIJOS, UNILAG, UNIFE etc. Better still, Dr Aduba’s arguments would suggest that the citing of the Ibadan campus of London University in 1948 was unnecessary during the colonial era  because London University could have been expanded to accommodate any “qualified” Nigerian trying to attend a university; however, it is a FACT that the citing of UI in Nigeria INFLUENCED a number of Nigerians and afforded the opportunity to attend a university. This is also  why cities have more schools to serve their population. As I said previously,  if Nigeria was to wait until every Secondary School was of Fed Govt College standard before allowing St Peter's College Agenebode to be established, several of us would've had very rough path to education…..distance to Benin City/Ibadan, influence of the institution on the people and environment etc; or if Ogbemudia had listened to the naysayers complaining about the educational standard in converting Midwest institute to Uniben, think of how Edo and Delta people could have had the level of access to education that Uniben afforded and the fact that Uniben may rank higher than some older universities today. So  Nigeria needs more higher institutions at all loongus and corners of the nation! The return on a university education is immeasurable, regardless of the standard. FACT!!!
                  The resource factor to maintain a university up to an acceptable educational standard is an IMPORTANT element in Dr Aduba’s analysis; however, I am quickly reminded of the pertinent words of a famous West African Poet, JP Clark who said: the water in the Calabash vices with the mighty Volta; as we all know, as you have the Harvard, Preston, MIT, Yale, Stanford and the Ivy League schools in USA, so you have the Univ of the District of Columbia in Wash DC and the Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas or FL Memorial College in Miami, Florida. There are Community Colleges as well! If America was to wait until they had all universities at the standard of Harvard before building the Communities Colleges and other Low and Moderate universities, or continue to EXPAND the Ivy Leagues to accommodate more students, there wont be CUNY, Howard University, Southwestern Univ etc etc. Besides, from the several universities established in the society there shall emerge the cremes, the ivy leagues and Harvards of Nigeria in near or distant future. And as Dr Ola Kassim and JUI observed previously, most educational development initiatives are anchored on their “potential”, not what is “given or immediately seen” in real terms because things can fall apart or grow into un-envisioned levels and forms that we can’t predetermine or calculate at the time of initiation of human development concepts like Education. Nigeria needs more universities! Take care. JU Igietseme
                   
                  From: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@... [mailto:nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...] On Behalf Of msabubakar@...
                  Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 6:19 PM
                  To: nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists@...
                  Subject: Re: [nigerianbiomedicalandlifescientists] Fairy tale about FG’s nine new varsities
                   
                    On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 2:45 PM, Baduba54 <baduba54@...> wrote:
                   
                  DOES NIGERIA NEED MORE UNIVERSITIES?
                  If one uses the population metric as a factor in deciding if more universities are needed in Nigeria (140 million at the last count) the answer is “yes”. If one uses demand (young people who want to attend universities) the answer again is “yes”. If the standard is the ratio in educated nations (number of universities per a population size), one still comes to the “yes” answer. What about the potential for economic development metric? The answer does not change. It is “yes” once more. But despite the overwhelming “yes” answers above, I say that Nigeria does not need more universities, not now. And here are my reasons.
                  Nigeria cannot afford more universities.  Sometime ago just after Mr. Bolaji Aluko moved to Otuoke to found the Federal University of Otuoke a commentator alleged that the university would receive N2 billion (or something like that). The founding VC Aluko denied the amount implying that the amount was overstated. He never gave the actual allocation. I am going to assume that the actual vote was ten times that (about N20 billion). Even so we are talking about only $130 million to start a university. Mr. Aluko would agree that $130m would be about the size of the operating budget of his former university’s department of chemical engineering. Note that I wrote chemical engineering not the entire engineering department. Chemical engineering is just a fraction of the engineering department. Note also that I said operating budget. New building structures would not be part of this $130m. And Howard isn’t Harvard or MIT.
                  It should be obvious that $130m to start a university is a huge joke. If one wants to start a university from scratch we must be thinking in terms of $1 billion. Nigeria cannot afford to build more universities at this time even if the population is twice 140 million.
                   
                  The number of universities does not necessarily mean that more students would be educated, nor does it imply that it is the most efficient way to educate more students. I am merely using FUO to illustrate my point because this institution is the best known of the other 9 institutions started a few years ago and any body could use any other one as substitute. FUO in its first year admitted 200 students in 8 departments for an average of 25 students per department. This number of additional students could have been absorbed in the existing university without one additional naira for a savings of N2-20 billion.
                  I agree that the new facilities would eventually admit more students with a mere fraction of additional revenue. But that is why I say we do not need new universities now.
                   
                  Nigeria does not have university ready streams of students. For support for this position read again the stories about what is happening at Kaduna state school system. Schools academic faculty members could not pass exam set for 4th grade students. If faculty members who have (supposedly) already received the full education regime were not ready for beyond the 4th grade imagine the standards for the WASC holders applying to universities. It is hard to assume that this situation is peculiar to just Kaduna state. What if all northern states’ school systems is this way? What if the story is true of all Nigerian school systems? I think that instead of building more universities the available resources should be devoted to improving the quality of primary and high schools first.
                  Imagine what an Aluko could do with $130 million if he were to use it to start a quality High School. It will be a match to or even better than what his old high school was like when he attended it. Those graduates would be ready for university education just as Mr. Aluko and his classmates were. Nigerians who came to North America or Europe in the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s with WASC sailed through college (any caliber of college) with flying colors. And most of them went to top schools and some worked full time while doing so.
                   
                  Jobs requiring college level education are not available in enough numbers for university graduates. Available jobs in agriculture, transportation, craft centers, etc do not require college education. Why waist tens of thousands of naira to educate a person for a job that a good high school education would be enough for? Why not build trade or technical schools instead? See what Peter Enahoro (Peter Pan) and his brother Tony Enahoro did with a good school certificate! They wrote more books and papers then many university graduates have read.
                   
                  The bottom line is we do not need more universities now. Let us stop building high schools and calling them universities.
                   
                  Benjamin Obiajulu Aduba
                  Boston, Massachusetts
                  February 25, 2013
                  Sent by DiGi from my BlackBerry® Smartphone

                  From: Kabiru Kalgo <kabirukalgo@...>


                   
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