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Re: NigerianID | Debe Ojukwu in pics 2

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  • OLUWATOYIN ADEPOJU
    A fantstic summation from Nebukadineze . It brought tears to my eyers. toyin ... -- Compcros
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 5, 2012
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      A fantstic summation from Nebukadineze.

      It brought tears to my eyers.

      toyin

      On Wed, Dec 5, 2012 at 5:32 AM, <Nebukadineze@...> wrote:
       

       
       
      Wharfy,
       
      I am stunned by Mazi Asagwara's claims. Unless he was speaking specifically of his village, what he described, about recognition and acceptance of male offspring, is not true of global Igbo culture. A male child sired out of marriage always returns to the father upon being discovered or upon becoming an adult. The only exception to that rule occurs only when the male child was made with a married woman and the husband accepted the child.
       
      My grand father sired three male children outside of his marriage. Two of those men were of my kindred, the third (let's just call him Agu for this discussion) was born outside of our kindred. When I was much younger, I used wonder why those men looked just like my father and why their children looked like us (Adiele children). When I became a teenager, my grandmother pointed to Agu's children (his village and ours, though absolutely close to each other, could intermarry) and forbade any sexual relationship with his daughters (she had done the same thing with others who became teenagers ahead of me because incest is abominable). These men, one of who was older than my father, never returned to our family because grandpa fathered them with married women and those husbands never denied them -- the children's resemblance to my grandfather (and the fact that he was a notorious womanizer) gave them away as his biological children. In this instance, according to Igbo culture, iko ejela ikota nwa (a concubine has no claims over a child born in-marriage) -- this principle applies also in civil law. Except where statutorily exempted, any child born in-wedlock  is automatically the offspring of the husband. If the husband disputes the child, the onus of proving his dispute lies squarely upon him and in the event that the biological father of the child cannot be found, courts will not let him off being the father if reasonable time has passed before he initiated his dispute. 
       
      In Igbo culture, these offspring would have returned to my family and the oldest would have supplanted my father as the first son were they sired with unmarried women. The reason is really simple. In Igbo culture, lineage is established through the father. You are better off dead or not even being born in Igbo land if you are a male child born to an unwed mother and you do not know your father -- a male child has no rights at his maternal home. This is why every male child born out of wedlock always looks for his father. It is also why no respectable Igbo man would reject his male offspring from an out of wedlock affair -- rejecting the child sentences him to a life of worthlessness lineage-wise.
       
      Mazi Asagwara also erred egregiously in qualifying a male child as "Nwa Okpu". Again, unless that is so in his village, his assertion was the first time I had heard something like that. Umuamala are male offspring of any village, while Umuokpu are their female counterparts. Umuokpu always leave their village of birth (via marriage) to become Ndom at their married villages. As Ndom of their new villages, they then begin bringing forth the next generation of umuamala and umuokpu. This is why Ndi Igbo say: "Onye apari amagi shi adanne ya wu obia" (a fool does not know that his sister is a guest of honor).
       
      Mazi Asagwara queries further:
       
      • Debe Sylvester Ojukwu the unrecognized son of late General Ojukwu in Igbo tradition and custom with all due respect is, Nwa Okpu; meaning, a son/daughter had out of Igbo traditional rites of marriage. Are you then surprised that the entire Ojukwu family members refused him participation in the burial rites and passage of General Ojukwu? Besides, General Ojukwu when he was alive presented and declared before his family members that Emeka Ojukwu Jr. is his Diokpara as in first son and successor in the headship of his line in Ojukwu lineage. Had he accepted Chief Debe Sylvester Ojukwu as his son and heir apparent, would he have declared Emeka Ojukwu Jr. heir apparent in place of Debe?
       
       
      First of all, a male child is never a "nwaokpu" in global Igbo culture. Second of all, and more important of all, a true Igbo man is not at liberty to reject a male child he sired out of wedlock and to impose a younger child of his from his marriage as Diokpara. An Igbo man who rejects such a son is considered an Ofeke (a bum). Odumegwu Ojukwu was no bum; he was not a novice to Igbo culture and therefore could not have rejected Debe Ojukwu once his existence became known. This is why reasonable people are troubled by this Will, which practically portrays Ojukwu in the light that his Nigerian adversaries have always portrayed him -- self-centered, opportunistic, despotic, rascal, flippancy, uncultured, unnecessarily controversial, etc. Most of us know that this description fits not the Ojukwu we considered our leader and this is why we are speaking out.
       
      Third of all, there is no ring of truth to the absurdity that Ikemba presented Jr to his family members as his first son while alive. Such claim makes no sense at all because it is not a normal thing to do. If Jr is Ikemba's first son, Ikemba needed not to present him to his greater family -- Jr's place should speak for itself. How many of us here have presented our first sons to our families and made such declarations as attributed to Ikemba? The only reason some people are bandying this silly claim around is to divide and conquer -- get Debe and Jr fighting over who is the first son and who gets the house in Nnewi, while someone keeps busy with what really matters and gets away with demeaning Ojukwu with this illogical Will.
       
      Fourth of all, if the criterion for accepting Jr as Ikemba's first son was the alleged presentation of him to the entire family, why don't we ask why Tenny Haman was not presented to the family too? 
       
      • About General Ojukwu’s Will, who can authoritatively say it is not genuine? Asagwara
       
      This is another wrong question to pose because no one, outside of the Ojukwu family, has categorically said that the Will is not genuine. Debe and Jr, who are not even on the same side, have independently stated that the Will is not authentic. Most reasonable people share their belief  because the Will that was read by Bianca's lawyer projects Ojukwu in the light unbecoming of the great leader we thought we had in him. Anyone who genuinely loved Ojukwu should defend the man's integrity now that he is not in a position to defend it by himself. It is an insult to the great Ikemba to not question Bianca's actions simply because she is beautiful (by the way, I don't share in her so-called beauty; she is too masculine for my liking).
       
      I posed a question to a cardiologist friend of mine. What is the advantage in not sending a man who suffered a stroke to the hospital? "There is only an advantage if the objective is that the patient survives not", he answered. That was what was done to Odumegwu Ojukwu; he was kept at home for months after he suffered a stroke and when he was finally transferred to UNTH, the doctors there were livid that he was not brought to them right away -- he deteriorated severely while being kept at home. What reason, other than the worse case scenario, would an educated woman, who is over 40 years old, have for taking the type of action that Bianca took? Here, in America, her callous decision would have been a reason for the state to step in, terminate her right over him, and appoint a conservator for his affairs.
       
      If the above was not egregious enough, Bianca outdid herself while Ojukwu was in a hospice in England. She accepted a position from Ebele as Special Assistant on Diaspora blah-blah-blah, even though the rumor that Ebele preys on vulnerable women with government appointments is as rampant as corruption in Nigeria. As Eze Igbo Gburugburu, his widow was supposed to mourn him for a full year. Did Bianca do that if she accepted an Ambassadorship from the philandering Ebele? Why are Ndi Igbo not baffled by her total immersion into appointive political office holding since her husband took ill and died? Was his existence an impediment to an ambitious woman?
       
      Why are Ndi Igbo blind to the fact that some of Bianca's utterances and conducts are demeaning of the great Ikemba? The Will read by her lawyer robs Ojukwu of his worth in Igbo culture --I do not believe that Ojukwu made that Will. Adding to that, she intoned upon the reading of the Will, "This time Around, he did not disappoint us". Why don't Ndi Igbo recognize that her sentence implies that Ojukwu was a serial disappointment to whoever she meant by "us"? To accentuate her demythifying of the Ikemba, she claimed to have not known about the new daughter, Tenny Haman. In other words, Ojukwu was a cheat, a liar, a secretive sociopath, and irredeemably untrustworthy. Does any Igbo believe that Ojukwu would live with this woman for over 20 years and not mention to her of a daughter he sired before she (Bianca) was even born? If even if that was the case, should she not have protected his image by pretending to have known about the lady? Haba, my people, what is wrong with some of us?
       
      I don't believe in the bible but those of you who believe in it, have you not read of Delilah? If umu-Israel had not allowed her beauty to blind and cow them, would Samson have been defeated? Did Area Scatter not ask in one of his songs: "Umu Igbo, ana eri mma eri" (Igbo people, is beauty edible)? Shall we not speak for Ojukwu, who spoke for us when we could not speak for ourselves, simply because his widow is allegedly beautiful? Ejikwem ogu o, omenala alakpuola, if a Mazi Asagwara can be this blind sided! Where is my brother, the indomitable Ogbuonyeiro nwa de Opara?
       
      Chineke ekwekwala shi aru mee (let God forbid abomination from occurring)!
       
       
      Nebukadineze Adiele
      Religion is Deception


       
      In a message dated 12/4/2012 7:03:50 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, wharfsnake@... writes:
       

      Nwanna Mazi KC:

      What you have described below is not same in orlu. In Orlu it is up to the family of the woman to contest the ownership of the child. If they did not contest the ownership of the child then the child belongs to the father. Contesting the child typically happens in families where there is no male heir or where the girl's father is stubborn and wants to send a message but in the majority of the cases the child goes home to his/her father when he/she is grown. 

      In some families there is an upheaval when such a child returns. One such example that I witnessed was a man who toiled as a youth in Cameroon and left a son there. About 6 years ago the son came for a visit and the wife was having a hissy-fit that her son is no longer the okpara. My experience is that the man is always happy to accept the child.

      It is therefore bewildering to me why there is this situation in the family of the great children. 

      WS
      A prince of the ancient town of Mushin.

      Sent from my iPhone. Forgive autocorrect.

      On Dec 4, 2012, at 2:36 PM, "Asagwara, Ken (EDU)" <Ken.Asagwara@...> wrote:

      Folks:

      The issue is not whether Chief Debe Sylvester Ojukwu resembles late General Ojukwu or not; nor whether he is indeed, his son or not. That a man fathered you outside traditional marriage or in church holy matrimony does not entitle you to share in his Will, if he decided to disinherit you. In Igbo tradition, until the man that fathered you carries the traditional Igbo palm wine, kola nuts, and in the company of his kinsmen, etc., journey to your mother’s family in readiness that says her parents and kinsmen, I want your daughter’s hand in marriage, you the son’s place is in your maternal home. That is, your mother’s home and family. That outsiders, including family members on both sides know he fathered you changes not that traditional imperative that is the way to recognize a child as legitimately belonging in the father’s family.

      I don’t know how many of you, especially, my Igbo brothers and sisters know the meaning of the name, “Nwa Okpu”. Yes, Chief Debe Sylvester Ojukwu the unrecognized son of late General Ojukwu in Igbo tradition and custom with all due respect is, Nwa Okpu; meaning, a son/daughter had out of Igbo traditional rites of marriage. Are you then surprised that the entire Ojukwu family members refused him participation in the burial rites and passage of General Ojukwu? Besides, General Ojukwu when he was alive presented and declared before his family members that Emeka Ojukwu Jr. is his Diokpara as in first son and successor in the headship of his line in Ojukwu lineage. Had he accepted Chief Debe Sylvester Ojukwu as his son and heir apparent, would he have declared Emeka Ojukwu Jr. heir apparent in place of Debe?

      About General Ojukwu’s Will, who can authoritatively say it is not genuine? You see, there are things that happen in families that outsiders do not know and may never understand.

      Those of you that never loved General Ojukwu that now comment on his Will and use the opportunity to insult his widow beautiful Bianca, and by extrapolation insult her beloved late husband, do you think readers do not see through you? Please, leave Bianca alone. To you all pocking your dirty noses where it does not belong, I say, butt out. The Ojukwus are capable of handling their family disputes. In the alternative, what are the courts of law for?

      Cheers.

      Mazi KC Prince Asagwara

      From: Daniel Elombah [mailto:elombahperspective@...]
      Sent: December-04-12 11:29 AM
      To: Nebukadineze@...
      Cc: vincent modebelu; Adeniran Adeboye; Nkechi; abiausa; abraham madu; Ezeana Igirigi Achusim; adeajayi@...; Wale Adedayo; toyin adepoju; adungbemorg@...; afis; agwu22@...; Mobolaji Aluko; Odimegwu Onwumere; Asagwara, Ken (EDU); emmanuelasiwe@...; Mr. Seyi Olu Awofeso; ayoojutalayo@...; eric; Benjamin Aduba; Idowu Bobo; buska; Orby Aginam; cmojini@...; davidwest62@...; dododawa@...; mbosowo@...; drnosaobanor@...; Noyo Edem; ekanem2@...; Tony Eluemunor; emeagwali@...; Dominic Ogbonna; Femi Ogunyipe; Iyalaje; Muhammad Musa; George Kerley; godwin27411@...; ibk@...; Emenike C.; ige.leye@...; ijebujesa@...; Dr. James Agazie; Ola Kassim; akinsola_kayode@...; george.kerley@...; kingsley Nnabuagha; Suji Kolawole; kunleade@...; leadershipnigeria@...; Martin Akindana; Moshood Olayinka; NaijaObserver@yahoogroups.com; nigeria360@yahoogroups.com; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; nowa; Olushola Fashedemi; Iyalaje; George C Ogbonna; Peter Opara; Valentine Ojo; Omo Odua; Prince Dickson; peterclaver2000@...; phbamaiyi@...; philidaewor@...; Pius Adesanmi; Pius Adesanmi; rexmarinus@...; samayodele@...; Sergius Ndinojuo; Wharf Snake; sundayejesieme@...; talknigeria@yahoogroups.com; tegbe2003@...; africa today; Tajudeen Raji; Ukaegbu; wadedayo@...; wale ojo lanre; Yakubu Usman; zekwueme@...; Chim Ahanotu; chuhwuemeka Okala; odera.igbo@...
      Subject: Re: ||NaijaObserver|| Debe Ojukwu in pics

      NO DOUBT ABOUT THAT!

      On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 2:21 AM, <Nebukadineze@...> wrote:

      There is no doubt that he is Ojukwu's son -- the resemblance is exceptionally striking.

      Nebukadineze Adiele
      Religion is Deception <image002.jpg>

      In a message dated 12/2/2012 11:25:18 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, vin_modebelu@... writes:

      Debe.jpg (545×767)


      vin.....///



      --

      Daniel Elombah

      Every Nigerian that has something important to say, says it on www.elombah.com

      Any account of history is only one interpretation.




      --
      Compcros
      Comparative Cognitive Processes and Systems
      "Exploring Every Corner of the Cosmos in Search of Knowledge"



    • Uzoma KLN
      Nobody, nobody knows when a frog cries. Everyday, every time, frogs look like they crying. There is only one way for frogman toying, tears. There are many
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 5, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Nobody, nobody knows when a frog cries. Everyday, every time, frogs look like they crying.

        There is only one way for frogman toying, tears. There are many reasons why Toyin and ilk would cry, innumerable reasons. To start: Form of origin is one.

        Regards,


        Uzoma KLN
        Uzoma KLN 
        (Life is simple, do not make it difficult) 

        Sent from my iPad

        On 05 Dec 2012, at 6:06 PM, OLUWATOYIN ADEPOJU <tvade3@...> wrote:

        A fantstic summation from Nebukadineze.

        It brought tears to my eyers.

        toyin

        On Wed, Dec 5, 2012 at 5:32 AM, <Nebukadineze@...> wrote:
         

         
         
        Wharfy,
         
        I am stunned by Mazi Asagwara's claims. Unless he was speaking specifically of his village, what he described, about recognition and acceptance of male offspring, is not true of global Igbo culture. A male child sired out of marriage always returns to the father upon being discovered or upon becoming an adult. The only exception to that rule occurs only when the male child was made with a married woman and the husband accepted the child.
         
        My grand father sired three male children outside of his marriage. Two of those men were of my kindred, the third (let's just call him Agu for this discussion) was born outside of our kindred. When I was much younger, I used wonder why those men looked just like my father and why their children looked like us (Adiele children). When I became a teenager, my grandmother pointed to Agu's children (his village and ours, though absolutely close to each other, could intermarry) and forbade any sexual relationship with his daughters (she had done the same thing with others who became teenagers ahead of me because incest is abominable). These men, one of who was older than my father, never returned to our family because grandpa fathered them with married women and those husbands never denied them -- the children's resemblance to my grandfather (and the fact that he was a notorious womanizer) gave them away as his biological children. In this instance, according to Igbo culture, iko ejela ikota nwa (a concubine has no claims over a child born in-marriage) -- this principle applies also in civil law. Except where statutorily exempted, any child born in-wedlock  is automatically the offspring of the husband. If the husband disputes the child, the onus of proving his dispute lies squarely upon him and in the event that the biological father of the child cannot be found, courts will not let him off being the father if reasonable time has passed before he initiated his dispute. 
         
        In Igbo culture, these offspring would have returned to my family and the oldest would have supplanted my father as the first son were they sired with unmarried women. The reason is really simple. In Igbo culture, lineage is established through the father. You are better off dead or not even being born in Igbo land if you are a male child born to an unwed mother and you do not know your father -- a male child has no rights at his maternal home. This is why every male child born out of wedlock always looks for his father. It is also why no respectable Igbo man would reject his male offspring from an out of wedlock affair -- rejecting the child sentences him to a life of worthlessness lineage-wise.
         
        Mazi Asagwara also erred egregiously in qualifying a male child as "Nwa Okpu". Again, unless that is so in his village, his assertion was the first time I had heard something like that. Umuamala are male offspring of any village, while Umuokpu are their female counterparts. Umuokpu always leave their village of birth (via marriage) to become Ndom at their married villages. As Ndom of their new villages, they then begin bringing forth the next generation of umuamala and umuokpu. This is why Ndi Igbo say: "Onye apari amagi shi adanne ya wu obia" (a fool does not know that his sister is a guest of honor).
         
        Mazi Asagwara queries further:
         
        • Debe Sylvester Ojukwu the unrecognized son of late General Ojukwu in Igbo tradition and custom with all due respect is, Nwa Okpu; meaning, a son/daughter had out of Igbo traditional rites of marriage. Are you then surprised that the entire Ojukwu family members refused him participation in the burial rites and passage of General Ojukwu? Besides, General Ojukwu when he was alive presented and declared before his family members that Emeka Ojukwu Jr. is his Diokpara as in first son and successor in the headship of his line in Ojukwu lineage. Had he accepted Chief Debe Sylvester Ojukwu as his son and heir apparent, would he have declared Emeka Ojukwu Jr. heir apparent in place of Debe?
         
         
        First of all, a male child is never a "nwaokpu" in global Igbo culture. Second of all, and more important of all, a true Igbo man is not at liberty to reject a male child he sired out of wedlock and to impose a younger child of his from his marriage as Diokpara. An Igbo man who rejects such a son is considered an Ofeke (a bum). Odumegwu Ojukwu was no bum; he was not a novice to Igbo culture and therefore could not have rejected Debe Ojukwu once his existence became known. This is why reasonable people are troubled by this Will, which practically portrays Ojukwu in the light that his Nigerian adversaries have always portrayed him -- self-centered, opportunistic, despotic, rascal, flippancy, uncultured, unnecessarily controversial, etc. Most of us know that this description fits not the Ojukwu we considered our leader and this is why we are speaking out.
         
        Third of all, there is no ring of truth to the absurdity that Ikemba presented Jr to his family members as his first son while alive. Such claim makes no sense at all because it is not a normal thing to do. If Jr is Ikemba's first son, Ikemba needed not to present him to his greater family -- Jr's place should speak for itself. How many of us here have presented our first sons to our families and made such declarations as attributed to Ikemba? The only reason some people are bandying this silly claim around is to divide and conquer -- get Debe and Jr fighting over who is the first son and who gets the house in Nnewi, while someone keeps busy with what really matters and gets away with demeaning Ojukwu with this illogical Will.
         
        Fourth of all, if the criterion for accepting Jr as Ikemba's first son was the alleged presentation of him to the entire family, why don't we ask why Tenny Haman was not presented to the family too? 
         
        • About General Ojukwu’s Will, who can authoritatively say it is not genuine? Asagwara
         
        This is another wrong question to pose because no one, outside of the Ojukwu family, has categorically said that the Will is not genuine. Debe and Jr, who are not even on the same side, have independently stated that the Will is not authentic. Most reasonable people share their belief  because the Will that was read by Bianca's lawyer projects Ojukwu in the light unbecoming of the great leader we thought we had in him. Anyone who genuinely loved Ojukwu should defend the man's integrity now that he is not in a position to defend it by himself. It is an insult to the great Ikemba to not question Bianca's actions simply because she is beautiful (by the way, I don't share in her so-called beauty; she is too masculine for my liking).
         
        I posed a question to a cardiologist friend of mine. What is the advantage in not sending a man who suffered a stroke to the hospital? "There is only an advantage if the objective is that the patient survives not", he answered. That was what was done to Odumegwu Ojukwu; he was kept at home for months after he suffered a stroke and when he was finally transferred to UNTH, the doctors there were livid that he was not brought to them right away -- he deteriorated severely while being kept at home. What reason, other than the worse case scenario, would an educated woman, who is over 40 years old, have for taking the type of action that Bianca took? Here, in America, her callous decision would have been a reason for the state to step in, terminate her right over him, and appoint a conservator for his affairs.
         
        If the above was not egregious enough, Bianca outdid herself while Ojukwu was in a hospice in England. She accepted a position from Ebele as Special Assistant on Diaspora blah-blah-blah, even though the rumor that Ebele preys on vulnerable women with government appointments is as rampant as corruption in Nigeria. As Eze Igbo Gburugburu, his widow was supposed to mourn him for a full year. Did Bianca do that if she accepted an Ambassadorship from the philandering Ebele? Why are Ndi Igbo not baffled by her total immersion into appointive political office holding since her husband took ill and died? Was his existence an impediment to an ambitious woman?
         
        Why are Ndi Igbo blind to the fact that some of Bianca's utterances and conducts are demeaning of the great Ikemba? The Will read by her lawyer robs Ojukwu of his worth in Igbo culture --I do not believe that Ojukwu made that Will. Adding to that, she intoned upon the reading of the Will, "This time Around, he did not disappoint us". Why don't Ndi Igbo recognize that her sentence implies that Ojukwu was a serial disappointment to whoever she meant by "us"? To accentuate her demythifying of the Ikemba, she claimed to have not known about the new daughter, Tenny Haman. In other words, Ojukwu was a cheat, a liar, a secretive sociopath, and irredeemably untrustworthy. Does any Igbo believe that Ojukwu would live with this woman for over 20 years and not mention to her of a daughter he sired before she (Bianca) was even born? If even if that was the case, should she not have protected his image by pretending to have known about the lady? Haba, my people, what is wrong with some of us?
         
        I don't believe in the bible but those of you who believe in it, have you not read of Delilah? If umu-Israel had not allowed her beauty to blind and cow them, would Samson have been defeated? Did Area Scatter not ask in one of his songs: "Umu Igbo, ana eri mma eri" (Igbo people, is beauty edible)? Shall we not speak for Ojukwu, who spoke for us when we could not speak for ourselves, simply because his widow is allegedly beautiful? Ejikwem ogu o, omenala alakpuola, if a Mazi Asagwara can be this blind sided! Where is my brother, the indomitable Ogbuonyeiro nwa de Opara?
         
        Chineke ekwekwala shi aru mee (let God forbid abomination from occurring)!
         
         
        Nebukadineze Adiele
        Religion is Deception <pastor%20bathes%20married%20woman.jpg>


         
        In a message dated 12/4/2012 7:03:50 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, wharfsnake@... writes:
         

        Nwanna Mazi KC:

        What you have described below is not same in orlu. In Orlu it is up to the family of the woman to contest the ownership of the child. If they did not contest the ownership of the child then the child belongs to the father. Contesting the child typically happens in families where there is no male heir or where the girl's father is stubborn and wants to send a message but in the majority of the cases the child goes home to his/her father when he/she is grown. 

        In some families there is an upheaval when such a child returns. One such example that I witnessed was a man who toiled as a youth in Cameroon and left a son there. About 6 years ago the son came for a visit and the wife was having a hissy-fit that her son is no longer the okpara. My experience is that the man is always happy to accept the child.

        It is therefore bewildering to me why there is this situation in the family of the great children. 

        WS
        A prince of the ancient town of Mushin.

        Sent from my iPhone. Forgive autocorrect.

        On Dec 4, 2012, at 2:36 PM, "Asagwara, Ken (EDU)" <Ken.Asagwara@...> wrote:

        Folks:

        The issue is not whether Chief Debe Sylvester Ojukwu resembles late General Ojukwu or not; nor whether he is indeed, his son or not. That a man fathered you outside traditional marriage or in church holy matrimony does not entitle you to share in his Will, if he decided to disinherit you. In Igbo tradition, until the man that fathered you carries the traditional Igbo palm wine, kola nuts, and in the company of his kinsmen, etc., journey to your mother’s family in readiness that says her parents and kinsmen, I want your daughter’s hand in marriage, you the son’s place is in your maternal home. That is, your mother’s home and family. That outsiders, including family members on both sides know he fathered you changes not that traditional imperative that is the way to recognize a child as legitimately belonging in the father’s family.

        I don’t know how many of you, especially, my Igbo brothers and sisters know the meaning of the name, “Nwa Okpu”. Yes, Chief Debe Sylvester Ojukwu the unrecognized son of late General Ojukwu in Igbo tradition and custom with all due respect is, Nwa Okpu; meaning, a son/daughter had out of Igbo traditional rites of marriage. Are you then surprised that the entire Ojukwu family members refused him participation in the burial rites and passage of General Ojukwu? Besides, General Ojukwu when he was alive presented and declared before his family members that Emeka Ojukwu Jr. is his Diokpara as in first son and successor in the headship of his line in Ojukwu lineage. Had he accepted Chief Debe Sylvester Ojukwu as his son and heir apparent, would he have declared Emeka Ojukwu Jr. heir apparent in place of Debe?

        About General Ojukwu’s Will, who can authoritatively say it is not genuine? You see, there are things that happen in families that outsiders do not know and may never understand.

        Those of you that never loved General Ojukwu that now comment on his Will and use the opportunity to insult his widow beautiful Bianca, and by extrapolation insult her beloved late husband, do you think readers do not see through you? Please, leave Bianca alone. To you all pocking your dirty noses where it does not belong, I say, butt out. The Ojukwus are capable of handling their family disputes. In the alternative, what are the courts of law for?

        Cheers.

        Mazi KC Prince Asagwara

        From: Daniel Elombah [mailto:elombahperspective@...]
        Sent: December-04-12 11:29 AM
        To: Nebukadineze@...
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        Subject: Re: ||NaijaObserver|| Debe Ojukwu in pics

        NO DOUBT ABOUT THAT!

        On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 2:21 AM, <Nebukadineze@...> wrote:

        There is no doubt that he is Ojukwu's son -- the resemblance is exceptionally striking.

        Nebukadineze Adiele
        Religion is Deception <image002.jpg>

        In a message dated 12/2/2012 11:25:18 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, vin_modebelu@... writes:

        Debe.jpg (545×767)


        vin.....///



        --

        Daniel Elombah

        Every Nigerian that has something important to say, says it on www.elombah.com

        Any account of history is only one interpretation.




        --
        Compcros
        Comparative Cognitive Processes and Systems
        "Exploring Every Corner of the Cosmos in Search of Knowledge"



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