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unorthodox question about ore bins

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  • wayneperrier
    I am building a mill that is serviced at the top by a 20 gauge tram, which dumps ore into a bin. This bin in integrated into the structure and actually has
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 2, 2009
      I am building a mill that is serviced at the top by a 20" gauge tram, which dumps ore into a bin. This bin in "integrated" into the structure and actually has board-and-batten siding on the outside.

      The question is : Is there any precedent for ore bins where the bracing (ie, heavy timbers) is on the inside of the bin rather than the outside? In the case of my mill the outside of the bin is obscured by the siding, but the inside is visible so I am interested in putting the timbers on the inside for visual appeal.

      Is this an arrangement that is pseudo-prototypical ? thanks in advance.

      Wayne
    • William Uffelman
      Bracing on outside so that lining boards press against the framing from weight of material. If the lining was outside it would pop off. Same reason livestock
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 2, 2009
        Bracing on outside so that lining boards press against the framing from weight of material. If the lining was outside it would pop off. Same reason livestock fencing is inside the posts.
         
        Bill Uffelman
        Las Vegas NV

        --- On Thu, 7/2/09, wayneperrier <wperrier@...> wrote:


        From: wayneperrier <wperrier@...>
        Subject: [NGMMG] unorthodox question about ore bins
        To: NGMMG@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, July 2, 2009, 3:24 PM


        I am building a mill that is serviced at the top by a 20" gauge tram, which dumps ore into a bin.  This bin in "integrated" into the structure and actually has board-and-batten siding on the outside.

        The question is :  Is there any precedent for ore bins where the bracing (ie, heavy timbers) is on the inside of the bin rather than the outside?  In the case of my mill the outside of the bin is obscured by the siding, but the inside is visible so I am interested in putting the timbers on the inside for visual appeal.

        Is this an arrangement that is pseudo-prototypical ? thanks in advance.

        Wayne



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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kjb80401@aol.com
        Wayne, The design logic is that the boards placed on the inside are being forced by the ore load against the outer framing and are therefor not dependent on
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 2, 2009
          Wayne,

          The design logic is that the boards placed on the inside are being forced
          by the ore load against the outer framing and are therefor not dependent on
          nails or bolts to hold the siding in place.

          Inside bracing would be neat but not accurate as to prototype practice.

          Keevan


          In a message dated 7/2/2009 4:25:19 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
          wperrier@... writes:

          I am building a mill that is serviced at the top by a 20" gauge tram,
          which dumps ore into a bin. This bin in "integrated" into the structure and
          actually has board-and-batten siding on the outside.

          The question is : Is there any precedent for ore bins where the bracing
          (ie, heavy timbers) is on the inside of the bin rather than the outside? In
          the case of my mill the outside of the bin is obscured by the siding, but
          the inside is visible so I am interested in putting the timbers on the
          inside for visual appeal.

          Is this an arrangement that is pseudo-prototypical ? thanks in advance.


          **************Make your summer sizzle with fast and easy recipes for the
          grill. (http://food.aol.com/grilling?ncid=emlcntusfood00000005)


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Harold Huber
          Wayne, 90% or more were with the bracing on the outside to be stronger holding the ore. The ores weight against the inside boards then agains the bracing. I
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 3, 2009
            Wayne,
            90% or more were with the bracing on the outside to be stronger holding the ore. The ores weight against the inside boards then agains the bracing. I do not believe I have seen any with the bracing on the inside, but then there is always a protoype some where.
            Harold Huber
            Ultimate Research
            Sheridan, WY
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: wayneperrier
            To: NGMMG@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2009 4:24 PM
            Subject: [NGMMG] unorthodox question about ore bins





            I am building a mill that is serviced at the top by a 20" gauge tram, which dumps ore into a bin. This bin in "integrated" into the structure and actually has board-and-batten siding on the outside.

            The question is : Is there any precedent for ore bins where the bracing (ie, heavy timbers) is on the inside of the bin rather than the outside? In the case of my mill the outside of the bin is obscured by the siding, but the inside is visible so I am interested in putting the timbers on the inside for visual appeal.

            Is this an arrangement that is pseudo-prototypical ? thanks in advance.

            Wayne





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ken Clark
            Wayne Pretty certain you have got a good idea of construction now. For visual appeal, you could consider a different style of ore bin. I have photos
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 3, 2009
              Wayne

              Pretty certain you have got a good idea of construction now.
              For visual appeal, you could consider a different style of ore bin.
              I have photos somewhere<G>. of 6 sided bins using 2x8 in layers, with no outside bracing.
              A small bin with the lower terminal of a tram which supplied it
              (collasped into the bin) at the "Lucky Jim" mine at Retallack British Columbia. The bin transferred it to the haulage railway which
              served the mill.
              A larger bin in service at the "Klondyke Silver" mill in Sandon BC
              has been in service for 55+ years, KS is the 8th or 9th owner/operator of the mill there. Ore is trucked in, currently from the Yukon, but they are looking at reopening some of the local mines.

              Ken Clark
              GWN

              --- In NGMMG@yahoogroups.com, "wayneperrier" <wperrier@...> wrote:
              >
              > I am building a mill that is serviced at the top by a 20" gauge tram, which dumps ore into a bin. This bin in "integrated" into the structure and actually has board-and-batten siding on the outside.
              >
              > The question is : Is there any precedent for ore bins where the bracing (ie, heavy timbers) is on the inside of the bin rather than the outside? In the case of my mill the outside of the bin is obscured by the siding, but the inside is visible so I am interested in putting the timbers on the inside for visual appeal.
              >
              > Is this an arrangement that is pseudo-prototypical ? thanks in advance.
              >
              > Wayne
              >
            • Duane Ericson
              I can t remember any examples of ore bins with the bracing inside, but it seems like there probably is a prototype somewhere. I do remember seeing a couple of
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 3, 2009
                I can't remember any examples of ore bins with the bracing inside, but it seems like there probably is a prototype somewhere. I do remember seeing a couple of mills where the ore bins were incorporated as part of the mill structure with the same siding covering both.
              • Brian Rumary
                ... I would think inside bracing would be liable to damage by the ore and be steadily battered and splintered away. Also it could be more likely to cause ore
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 4, 2009
                  Kjb80401@... wrote:

                  > Inside bracing would be neat but not accurate as to prototype practice.

                  I would think inside bracing would be liable to damage by the ore and be
                  steadily battered and splintered away. Also it could be more likely to
                  cause ore to clog up in the shoot? Smooth boards, although not totally
                  immune to damage, would still be likely to last much longer.

                  Brian Rumary, England

                  www.rumary.co.uk
                • Kjb80401@aol.com
                  Brian, It was common to cover the sloping floor of the chute with sheet metal to ease the sliding of the ore and to protect the wooden floor underneath. Ore
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jul 4, 2009
                    Brian,

                    It was common to cover the sloping floor of the chute with sheet metal to
                    ease the sliding of the ore and to protect the wooden floor underneath.

                    Ore would clog in the chute from time to time. A long-handle tool,
                    similar to a fire rake used in locomotives, was used to break it loose.

                    Keevan


                    In a message dated 7/4/2009 5:39:49 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
                    brian@... writes:

                    Kjb80401@... wrote:

                    > Inside bracing would be neat but not accurate as to prototype practice.

                    I would think inside bracing would be liable to damage by the ore and be
                    steadily battered and splintered away. Also it could be more likely to
                    cause ore to clog up in the shoot? Smooth boards, although not totally
                    immune to damage, would still be likely to last much longer.

                    Brian Rumary, England

                    **************Make your summer sizzle with fast and easy recipes for the
                    grill. (http://food.aol.com/grilling?ncid=emlcntusfood00000005)


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • davidry@osorail.com
                    I d like to add a few observations if I may, having visited several surviving bins here in the West. The timbers were thick and hearty and all I ve seen are
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jul 4, 2009
                      I'd like to add a few observations if I may, having visited several
                      surviving bins here in the West. The timbers were thick and hearty and
                      all I've seen are rough sawn. You can even tell if the board were done
                      on a circular mill (arc cuts along the face of the board) or a band saw
                      (cuts perpendicular to the board length.) There was no planing or
                      sanding. Also, especially early on, metal was expensive and hard to come
                      by. Surviving chute doors I've seen are primarily metal, especially the
                      tracks and the rack and pinion used to open and close the doors. If
                      there was any metal sheeting it would have been at the bottom only, not
                      on the side walls. The only other major metal (besides chutes, etc.) was
                      the truss rods and bolts used on the outside (always) timbers to hold
                      the thing together.

                      Dave Rygmyr
                      NorthWest Short Line (www.nwsl.com)
                      Oso Publishing & Evergreen Hill Designs (www.osorail.com)
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