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Metal smoke stack question

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  • Sam
    I ve been wondering how a metal smoke stack, like on a stationary boiler, would have been erected before the development of mobile cranes. Did they use some
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 13, 2012
      I've been wondering how a metal smoke stack, like on a stationary boiler, would have been erected before the development of mobile cranes. Did they use some sort of scafold and jib crane arrangement? Has anyone seen a photo of the process?

      Thanks,
      Sam Bass
    • jcmm3030@aol.com
      Sam-- There are several ways. First is a gin pole, which you raise with a pair of guylines. Second is an A-frame which you put up the same way. They
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 13, 2012
        Sam--
         
                There are several ways.   First is a gin pole, which you raise with a pair of guylines.   Second is an A-frame which you put up the same way.   They only have to be as high as the half length of the stack.  The third way is to use a skyline--only if you are in suitable mountainous country!   You might even raise the stack like raising a spar tree--with guylines and a raising prop.         John C.
      • Sam
        Thanks, John. That s kinda what I was thinking. In the same vein, would they stand the stack before the building was erected or after? And, what about some
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 13, 2012
          Thanks, John. That's kinda what I was thinking. In the same vein, would they stand the stack before the building was erected or after? And, what about some mill and/or smelter stacks that were 100' tall or more? Seems to me that a gin pole or A-frame would be somewhat unwieldy, and the sheet metal stack would have a tendency to collapse. Would the thickness of the metal used in the stack be greater on, say, the bottom half than the top? I've obviously got way too much time on my hands at the moment. 8-)

          Sam

          --- In NGMMG@yahoogroups.com, jcmm3030@... wrote:
          >
          > Sam--
          >
          > There are several ways. First is a gin pole, which you raise
          > with a pair of guylines. Second is an A-frame which you put up the same
          > way. They only have to be as high as the half length of the stack.
        • jcmm3030@aol.com
          Sam-- For a stack that high say 100 ft. you might need a little more sophisticated approach, say a pair of guyed poles maybe 60 feet high, one on each side
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 13, 2012
            Sam--
             
                    For a stack that high say 100 ft. you might need a little more sophisticated approach, say a pair of guyed poles maybe 60 feet high, one on each side of the stack, lifting on a strongback which cradles the central part of the stack which is being lifted just above its midpoint.  The base would be centered under the poles.    Most high stacks were on a pedastal rather than on top of the boiler, with breeching from the boiler.
             
                    What an interesting problem.   Probably when they got over say 70 feet or so it was tempting to go to brick, unless the temporary nature of the plant dictated a more temporary style.    As to how well an oil can type stack can be lifted I see in Lidgerwood catalogs the oilcan type steel spars lifted just by pulling on the upper end from a frame which gives them a little elevation.   These oilcan spars were riveted from plates in a form that resembles stacks of oil cans, plates being about 5 feet in height and the stacks looking like 30 inches diameter or more--somewhat similar to your smokestacks.
                                                    John C.
          • KC
            Sam In all likly hood they came prerolled in 1/2 section s, scaffolding would have been used to add a section, bolted or riviteed then the scaffolding raised
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 14, 2012
              Sam

              In all likly hood they came prerolled in 1/2 section's, scaffolding would have been used to add a section, bolted or riviteed then the scaffolding raised for the next section to be added. The interior lower section would be either brick or Gunite lined for excess heat protection
              at the base.

              Ken Clark
              GWN

              --- In NGMMG@yahoogroups.com, "Sam" <tinticng@...> wrote:
              >
              > I've been wondering how a metal smoke stack, like on a stationary boiler, would have been erected before the development of mobile cranes. Did they use some sort of scafold and jib crane arrangement? Has anyone seen a photo of the process?
              >
              > Thanks,
              > Sam Bass
              >
            • Sam
              Thanks John and Ken, The question arose when I began thinking of building a model of the Tintic (Knight) Smelter at Silver City, UT. Haven t scaled the height
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 14, 2012
                Thanks John and Ken,

                The question arose when I began thinking of building a model of the Tintic (Knight) Smelter at Silver City, UT. Haven't scaled the height of the smelter stack, but it looks to be in the neighborhood of 75'. It sat on top of a concrete foundation about 15' high. The brick duct work from the dust chambers entered the base of the stack. The stack itself appears to be at least 4' in diameter. Another smelter with a large diameter sheet metal stack belonged to the Empire Copper Co. at Mackay, ID.

                Cheers,
                Sam Bass
              • David Barron
                These basically large tubes were constructred horizontally while on the ground. They were braced with wood on the interior to stiffen them and prevent a
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 14, 2012
                  These basically large tubes were constructred horizontally while on the
                  ground. They were braced with wood on the interior to stiffen them and
                  prevent a folding action. The were then raised vertically and held with
                  support cables and locked into place. Then workers went up inside the tube
                  and started removing the wood braces from the top and working back down.
                  OSHA was not around in those days and almost anything went.

                  MMR#200




                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Sam" <tinticng@...>
                  To: <NGMMG@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: 2012-02-14 18:29
                  Subject: [NGMMG] Re: Metal smoke stack question


                  > Thanks John and Ken,
                  >
                  > The question arose when I began thinking of building a model of the Tintic
                  > (Knight) Smelter at Silver City, UT. Haven't scaled the height of the
                  > smelter stack, but it looks to be in the neighborhood of 75'. It sat on
                  > top of a concrete foundation about 15' high. The brick duct work from the
                  > dust chambers entered the base of the stack. The stack itself appears to
                  > be at least 4' in diameter. Another smelter with a large diameter sheet
                  > metal stack belonged to the Empire Copper Co. at Mackay, ID.
                  >
                  > Cheers,
                  > Sam Bass
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Sam
                  Many thanks, David, I hadn t thought of interior bracing on the stacks. Should have though since I ve seen many large diameter pipes and tanks shipped with
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 14, 2012
                    Many thanks, David,

                    I hadn't thought of interior bracing on the stacks. Should have though since I've seen many large diameter pipes and tanks shipped with wood or steel bracing.

                    Cheers,
                    Sam Bass
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