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Re: waste dumps/tailings piles - now colors

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  • Mike
    I don t doubt that but I limited my remarks to metallic mining, which was the mainstay of mining in the San Juans, Clear Creek, Leadville, Cripple Creek, etc.
    Message 1 of 33 , Aug 1, 2010
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      I don't doubt that but I limited my remarks to metallic mining, which was the mainstay of mining in the San Juans, Clear Creek, Leadville, Cripple Creek, etc. Specifically, base and precious metal mining. The uranium mining was limited to the western slope of Colorado near the RGS, with only the one mill T first (Vanadium) and later the smelter at Durango.

      Mike Condef

      --- In NGMMG@yahoogroups.com, John Stokes <ggstokes@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Actually there were a lot of tailings in Colorado that were yellow, and it was finally realized that the reason was uranium ore, and as a result old tailings were gleaned and processed for this treasure back in WWII days.
      >
      > John S.
      >
      >
      >
      > To: NGMMG@yahoogroups.com
      > From: vulturenest1@...
      > Date: Sat, 31 Jul 2010 19:21:51 +0000
      > Subject: [NGMMG] Re: waste dumps/tailings piles - now colors
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Sam is right about colors, very rarely gave I seen new waste rock beings yellow color. Lots of grays, but also various reds where an iron-bearing rock is encountered. The dumps with which I am familiar were never a single color as the wast Rick would come from many parts of the mines.
      >
      > But after 30-40 years, the minerals break down and dumps tend towards a single yellowish-reddish color. Most of this comes from breaking down of iron pyrites (note that I am talking about metal mining, not coal or non-metal mines, and sulfidic ores). And the streams draining from thes dumps often gave the rust red staining of iron pyrites along their banks.
      >
      > Also, distinguish between waste rock from mines and tailings from mills. The latter are almost always very, very light in color. In fact, when I was on the tailings ponds in Arizona, I had to wear two pair of sunglasses to prevent th equivalent of snow blIndness. And like mine dumps, aged tailings also stained over the years, resulting in the yellowish dumps we see today in Colorado mill sites.
      >
      > Mike Conder
      >
      > --- In NGMMG@yahoogroups.com, "tinticng" <tinticng@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Sometimes using the correct slope on a waste dump for a mine model takes up more space than is available. I've been known to "fudge" the angle to about 45 degrees and still have it look right.
      > >
      > > I've found an excellent source for mine waste in the tailings from the cyanide mill at Mercur, Utah. The material varies in size from dust to pieces about 3mm with some larger stuff up to about 5 or 6mm. Perfect for HO scale waste dumps. And, it has that yellowish rust color seen on prototype dumps.
      > >
      > > Fresh waste rock generally has a gray color. I've sifted material from a couple of dumps at Ophir, Utah to get material that matches.
      > >
      > > Sam Bass
      > >
      > > --- In NGMMG@yahoogroups.com, "Harold Huber" <sarge9@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Ron,
      > > > This is called the angle of repose in geological terminology, commonly is 33 - 37 degrees. Definition: the maximum slope or angle at which loose, cohesionless material remains stable. This angle depends on size of material, and other factors.
      > > > Harold Huber
      > > > Ultimate Rersearch LLC
      > > > Sheridan, WY
      > > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > > From: ronaldwolters
      > > > To: NGMMG@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Wednesday, July 28, 2010 11:48 AM
      > > > Subject: [NGMMG] waste dumps/tailings piles
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > So here is another question that probably has a simple answer.
      > > > what is the degree of the lope of a mine dump?
      > > > It seems to be the same everywhere I have looked. From the big dumps @ the Bingham copper mine, to the small ones I have seen @ small mines throughout the west.
      > > > Ron
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Mike
      I don t doubt that but I limited my remarks to metallic mining, which was the mainstay of mining in the San Juans, Clear Creek, Leadville, Cripple Creek, etc.
      Message 33 of 33 , Aug 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        I don't doubt that but I limited my remarks to metallic mining, which was the mainstay of mining in the San Juans, Clear Creek, Leadville, Cripple Creek, etc. Specifically, base and precious metal mining. The uranium mining was limited to the western slope of Colorado near the RGS, with only the one mill T first (Vanadium) and later the smelter at Durango.

        Mike Condef

        --- In NGMMG@yahoogroups.com, John Stokes <ggstokes@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Actually there were a lot of tailings in Colorado that were yellow, and it was finally realized that the reason was uranium ore, and as a result old tailings were gleaned and processed for this treasure back in WWII days.
        >
        > John S.
        >
        >
        >
        > To: NGMMG@yahoogroups.com
        > From: vulturenest1@...
        > Date: Sat, 31 Jul 2010 19:21:51 +0000
        > Subject: [NGMMG] Re: waste dumps/tailings piles - now colors
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Sam is right about colors, very rarely gave I seen new waste rock beings yellow color. Lots of grays, but also various reds where an iron-bearing rock is encountered. The dumps with which I am familiar were never a single color as the wast Rick would come from many parts of the mines.
        >
        > But after 30-40 years, the minerals break down and dumps tend towards a single yellowish-reddish color. Most of this comes from breaking down of iron pyrites (note that I am talking about metal mining, not coal or non-metal mines, and sulfidic ores). And the streams draining from thes dumps often gave the rust red staining of iron pyrites along their banks.
        >
        > Also, distinguish between waste rock from mines and tailings from mills. The latter are almost always very, very light in color. In fact, when I was on the tailings ponds in Arizona, I had to wear two pair of sunglasses to prevent th equivalent of snow blIndness. And like mine dumps, aged tailings also stained over the years, resulting in the yellowish dumps we see today in Colorado mill sites.
        >
        > Mike Conder
        >
        > --- In NGMMG@yahoogroups.com, "tinticng" <tinticng@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Sometimes using the correct slope on a waste dump for a mine model takes up more space than is available. I've been known to "fudge" the angle to about 45 degrees and still have it look right.
        > >
        > > I've found an excellent source for mine waste in the tailings from the cyanide mill at Mercur, Utah. The material varies in size from dust to pieces about 3mm with some larger stuff up to about 5 or 6mm. Perfect for HO scale waste dumps. And, it has that yellowish rust color seen on prototype dumps.
        > >
        > > Fresh waste rock generally has a gray color. I've sifted material from a couple of dumps at Ophir, Utah to get material that matches.
        > >
        > > Sam Bass
        > >
        > > --- In NGMMG@yahoogroups.com, "Harold Huber" <sarge9@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Ron,
        > > > This is called the angle of repose in geological terminology, commonly is 33 - 37 degrees. Definition: the maximum slope or angle at which loose, cohesionless material remains stable. This angle depends on size of material, and other factors.
        > > > Harold Huber
        > > > Ultimate Rersearch LLC
        > > > Sheridan, WY
        > > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > > From: ronaldwolters
        > > > To: NGMMG@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Sent: Wednesday, July 28, 2010 11:48 AM
        > > > Subject: [NGMMG] waste dumps/tailings piles
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > So here is another question that probably has a simple answer.
        > > > what is the degree of the lope of a mine dump?
        > > > It seems to be the same everywhere I have looked. From the big dumps @ the Bingham copper mine, to the small ones I have seen @ small mines throughout the west.
        > > > Ron
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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