Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

mine details

Expand Messages
  • ronaldwolters
    I have been thinking about the types of details that should be seen around a mine but are very seldom modeled. Hopefully we can start a good list with this
    Message 1 of 52 , Jul 8, 2010
      I have been thinking about the types of details that should be seen around a mine but are very seldom modeled.
      Hopefully we can start a good list with this topic that will help us all.

      I would get the ball rolling with the one thing that I have noticed in prototype photos... Lots of ore cars sitting around, timbers for underground work, wooden cable reels.
      Ron
    • tinticng
      The old saying that men are cheaper than timber is just a true today as it was back in the 1800s. Underground you can only be as safe as you make it. Sam
      Message 52 of 52 , Jul 21, 2010
        The old saying that "men are cheaper than timber" is just a true today as it was back in the 1800s. Underground you can only be as safe as you make it.

        Sam Bass

        --- In NGMMG@yahoogroups.com, "grumpygrady" <grumpygrady@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > i worked in a couple of mines in new mexico in the early 80's and all we used was rock bolts and chain link fencing
        > they only time timbers used was when they started pulling the columns and they cribbed up around the tugger and only when they had to
        > as i understand it rock bolts cost money and most mine owner and or managers didn't like to spend that lol
        > >
        > > In my experience, if the ground didn't require support you didn't need it. Of
        > > course most of my mining was in Colorado where only occasional ground support
        > > was required. When I worked for Anaconda at their Carr Fork Mine, we routinely
        > > used rock bolts (actually split sets) in the back because of the size of the
        > > tunnels we were driving and the nature of the rock, most of which was a very
        > > hard quartzite which had a tendency to form deep interlocking fractures when
        > > blasted.
        > >
        > >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.