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#4774 - Saturday, December 1, 2012

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    Archived issues of the NDHighlights are available online: http://nonduality.com/hlhome.htm Nonduality Highlights Issue
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 2, 2012
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      Archived issues of the NDHighlights are available online: http://nonduality.com/hlhome.htm

      Nonduality Highlights Issue #4774, Saturday, December 1, 2012





      Self stands as a wall between man and God.

      Bowl of Saki, November 1, by Hazrat Inayat Khan

      Commentary by Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan:

      God speaks to everyone, not only to the messengers and teachers. He speaks to the ears of every heart, but it is not every heart which hears it. His voice is louder than the thunder, and His light is clearer than the sun -- if one could only see it, if one could only hear it. In order to see it and in order to hear it man should remove this wall, this barrier which he has made of the self. Then he becomes the flute upon which the divine Player may play the music of Orpheus which can charm even the hearts of stone; then he rises from the cross into the life everlasting.

      Our limited self is like a wall separating us from the Self of God. God is as far away from us as that wall is thick. The wisdom and justice of God are within us, and yet they are far away under the covering of the veil of the limited self.

      Humility is the principal thing that must be learnt in the path of training the ego. It is the constant effort of effacing the ego that prepares man for the greater journey. This principle of humility can be practiced by forgetting one's personality in every thought and action and in every dealing with another. No doubt it is difficult and may not seem very practicable in everyday life, though in the end it will prove to be the successful way, not only in one's spiritual life but in one's everyday affairs. The general tendency is to bring one's personality forward, which builds a wall between two souls whose destiny and happiness lies in unity. In business, in profession, in all aspects of life it is necessary that one should unite with the other in this unity, in which the purpose of life is fulfilled.

      - posted to SufiMystic




      KHENPO TSULTRIM GYAMSTO RINPOCHE and MILAREPA

      A SONG FOR YOU

      The song "Profound Definitive Meaning Sung on the Snowy Range" was one that Milarepa sang to his disciples and his patrons after he had been in retreat for six months. At that time he was snowed in completely. There was so much snow that the roads were blocked and neither he nor anyone else was able to come in or out...

      Normally we would think of that as a very difficult situation, a negative condition for practice. But for him it wasn't at all. He was able to turn a negative situation into an aid to his practice. In the same way, when we're confronted with difficult situations, we should turn them into positive ones by bringing them onto the path of practice.

      MILAREPA'S SONG:
      The Profound Definitive Meaning Sung On the Snowy Range

      Sung on the Snowy Range

      Supreme guru, I bow down at your feet
      The siddhis of blessings come straight from the dakinis
      Samaya's nectar is the most nourishing drink

      Your offering of faith has kept me so healthy
      This way of gathering merit, it works quite well

      For the mind that masters view, the emptiness dawns
      In the content seen, not even an atom exists
      A seer and seen, refined until they're gone
      This way of realizing view, it works quite well

      When meditation is clear light river flow
      There is no need to confine it to sessions and breaks
      Meditator and object, refined until they're gone
      This heart bone of meditation, it beats quite well

      When you're sure that conduct's work is luminous light
      And you're sure that interdependence is emptiness
      A doer and deed, refined until they're gone
      This way of working with conduct, it works quite well

      When biased thinking has vanished into space
      No phony facades, eight dharmas, nor hopes and fears,
      A keeper and kept, refined until they're gone
      This way of keeping samaya, it works quite well

      When you've finally discovered your mind is dharmakaya
      And you're really doing yourself and others good
      A winner and won, refined until they're gone
      This way of winning results, it works quite well

      Oh faithful students, to answer your request
      This old man is singing a song of happiness
      The snow fell and sealed me in my retreat
      Where the dakinis gave me all I need

      The pure snow water was so delicious
      With nobody practicing, practice was glorious
      Without ever working, the harvest was perfectly reaped
      Without accumulating wealth, the treasure chest was filled

      Looking at mind, I see everything
      By staying low, I have come to seize the throne
      I have reached the highest peakĀ—that's the guru's kindness to me
      Now sons and daughters, students gathered here

      In answer to your faithful service
      I sing this song, teaching you the true Dharma
      My benefactors, may it fill your hearts with joy
      May all your hearts be filled with joy!

      - Under the guidance of Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinooche, translated and arranged by Jim Scott. The first two and last four verses translated by Ari Goldfield. From the Tibetan text at pages 222-3. Translation copyright 2012, Jim Scott and Ari Goldfield, posted to Facebook by Amrita Nadi




      Editor's note: Last Sunday, in issue #4768, I misattributed a quote to Lama John Mandansky, which I should have attributed to Lama John Makransky. I apologize for the mistake, and here's another insightful quote from him:

      Devotion is not our devotion to the buddhas, but our willingness to acknowledge how devoted the buddhas are to us in our very being, to acknowledge that so deeply that our sense of separation from the buddhas melts away, and we find that our deepest devotion, like the buddhas, is to everyone in their very being.

      - Lama John Makransky (thanks to Bob Morrison for the correction)



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