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#4714 - Monday, September 24, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee

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  • Gloria Lee
    #4714 - Monday, September 24, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee The Nonduality Highlights http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights/ When the mind is possessed of
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      #4714 - Monday, September 24, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee
      "When the mind is possessed of reality, it feels tranquil and joyous even without
      music or song, and it produces a pure fragrance even without incense or tea."
      ~ Hung Tzu-ch’eng 
      From the book: “A Chinese Garden of serenity,” published by Peter Pauper Press.
      via Daily Dharma

      It is the clinging to the false that makes the true so difficult to see. Once you 
      understand that the false needs time and what needs time is false, you are nearer
      the Reality, which is timeless, ever in the now. Eternity in time is mere 
      repetitiveness, like the movement of a clock. It flows from the past into the 
      future endlessly, as empty perpetuity. Reality is what makes the present so 
      vital, so different from the past and future, which are merely mental. If you 
      need time to achieve something, it must be false. The real is always with you; you
      need not wait to be what you are. Only you must not allow your mind to go out
      of yourself in search. When you want something, ask yourself: do I really need
      it?  and if the answer is no, then just drop it. 
      ~ Nisargadatta Maharaj 
      via Along The Way


      photo by Alan Larus
      Was it Light?
      By Theodore Roethke
      (1908 - 1963)
      Was it light?
      Was it light within?
      Was it light within light?
      Stillness becoming alive,
      Yet still?
      A lively understandable spirit
      Once entertained you.
      It will come again.
      Be still.



      photo by Alan Larus
      By Andrew Colliver
      (1953 - )
      You are woken in the night
      by something that cannot speak
      in daylight, that has no purchase
      in the hard currency of your life.
      Outside is the shallow well
      of a sleeping town; electric lights
      peek faintly into black space,
      and the lithe ghost of the dark
      slips into the only house that
      bids it welcome. Your husband
      lies snoring, dreams of another
      world, offers you rough the gift
      of aloneness. Know this:
      what arrives here cannot
      be other than itself, and
      has no care for you. It
      has no words, and no respect
      for yours, so finds your body,
      colonises your spine, feeds
      you up into the sea of stars. You
      may think you are changing,
      or hope; but you are simply
      failing to forget, allowing
      stillness to be recognised.
      You are momentarily disappearing,
      to enter your own voice, see
      with your own eyes, become
      the body you gave birth to;
      you have returned to
      your own faithfulness,
      your own unimaginable
      - From the unpublished manuscript A Day of Light, by Andrew Colliver

      Andrew Colliver is a psychiatric social worker working in rural New South
      Wales in Australia.
      His major influences in writing are Mary Oliver and David Whyte, "with a dash
      of Rumi's exuberance."
      When asked about the transcendent themes within his poetry, he says, "Poetry
      has always been a part of my reading, with occasional forays into writing, but
      for my own eyes only. Then, in 2006, the experience -- now happening to
      thousands across the globe -- of consciousness awakening to itself within the
      human form, began to up-end my life, and also to seek expression in words. Poems
      suggest themselves from the more profound experiences of awakeness, and what
      I do is then sculpt and refine them into something that I hope is intelligible to
      others. Ideas and words come most frequently when I'm in nature, but any
      setting can be seen at any time for what it is: the expression of undivided



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