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#4672 - Monday, August 6, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee

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  • Gloria Lee
    #4672 - Monday, August 6, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee The Nonduality Highlights http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights/ A.R.T. - Artistic Realization
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      #4672 - Monday, August 6, 2012 - Editor: Gloria Lee
       
       
       
      A.R.T. - Artistic Realization Technologies
      The A.R.T. method helps those with physical and developmental
      disabilities directly express their personal artistic visions.
       
      Mission
      A.R.T.’s mission is to provide techniques that give direct creative
      expression to those who lack use of their limbs -- even those with
      “locked-in syndrome” who can communicate only through eye signals or
      assistive devices.
      A.R.T. creates innovative tools and technologies. Our breakthrough
      approach brings perfect individual control of creative processes to a
      population that cannot walk, few can talk, and none have the articulate
      use of their hands.
       

       
      How is it possible for the A.R.T. artists to have such power?
       
      Imagine yourself no longer dashing about, no deadlines, no
      errands, no bills to pay. Imagine yourself able to sit perfectly
      still. Able to remain silent. Able to have the time to really look,
      listen, absorb and think. Imagine what an hour of perfect, fully
      awake, stillness and silence would allow your mind to take in.
       
      Now try to imagine yourself in this kind of 'ascetic' state', for
      a whole day. For a week. For a month. For a year. For ten years.
      Can you imagine this? Can you imagine how different your inner
      life would be?
       
      If the fuel of serious artists is: stillness, is silence... the A.R.T.
      artists have more fuel than the average person. Far more.
       
       
       

       
      (age 6)
       
      Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
       
       

       
      "It's like this. This kid who is quadriplegic, nonverbal rolls into the
      room. We've never met him, he's never met us. He's never done any art.
      I don't think he really ever went to school. And here he is. We find out
      his signal for yes and no then tell him, in this flat serious professional
      tone, how the A.R.T. techniques work. One of the staff leans in to speak,
      quietly suggesting, ‘I don't believe he understands anything you're
      saying.’ I think but do not say, ‘We'll see about that.’ What good is it to
      presume this young guy won't understand? How will we know until we let
      him show us he does?
       
      ‘Do you want to try it?’ we ask the young man we just met. He signals
      yes. He directs the exact size of the canvas. He locks into the directing
      the blending of his colors. He looks over all the brushes and all the
      other application tool options and picks one out. The way this young guy
      was spoken to by staff you'd think he was incapable of making any
      decisions on his own, and here he is locked into all these exacting
      choices. He's fixed on each move. And out comes this seriously kick-ass
      painting. Seriously kick ass. I mean gallery level. I mean you could hang
      it in a museum and no pro painter would poo-poo it, not at all. They
      wouldn't be able to because it's that good. His first painting. No art
      teacher. No one guiding him. No art history. No nothing. Just him and
      the materials, him in charge of it all. In charge, totally, probably for
      the first time in his life.
       
      So he didn't mess around. He had all this power inside him and it just
      came out. You wouldn't see the power if you just measured him by his
      physical appearance. But of course Art doesn't come from the body... it
      comes from the spirit. And the immobile body can hide the spirit, but
      it's there.
       
      The piece was far better than most of the stuff you'd see in a fancy
      art school. Much better. It was a real painting. Very direct, no fru-fru.
      It had power. It was clean.
      [...]
       
      I don't know if anyone else has worked with so many nonverbal
      quadriplegics living lives where they have so, so little creative
      decision-making power. The vast majority, almost all of them turn out
      paintings better than you see in art schools.
       
      People find this hard to accept. Why? Because they don't know what
      Art is or where it comes from. They think art comes from these rarified
      egotistical genius types. They have this cliché idea about what an artist
      is. They get all wrapped up in the romanticized version of the artist
      with their beret, the years of drawing from the model, the slow arduous
      process of struggling, tortured, to the realization of their 'vision'.
       
      Seriously good art doesn't need any of this. All it needs to be is good.
      And to be good it needs to ring true. And to ring true it has to come
      straight from the best part of you.
       
       
      This is what the A.R.T. artists do. It's in them, trapped, and when they
      see they have the chance to get it out? They throw themselves into it.
       
      Because most of them haven't been taught the conformist methods of
      making a house, a sun, a stick figure, a this and a that kids are taught to
      do, the A.R.T. artists start from the highest point of pure abstraction.
       
      Like the A.R.T. artist Eric Corbin told someone who asked him what it
      was like for him to have finished such a powerful, beautiful new
      painting, he told her, "Even Tim doesn't know how we live in the paint."
       
      Live in the paint. They aren't painting a picture. They aren't making a
      decoration. They are living in the paint. Sailing with its movement.
      Expanding with its color. This is what real artists do.
       
      One moment we have this young guy operating day after day, year after
      year at the lowest rung of Life's ladder, and the next he's operating up
      at the very top. He's not handicapped; he has excellent, exceptional
      powers.
       
       
      Thanks to Greg Allen Morgoglione for linking to this website.
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