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#3363 - Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - Editor: Gloria Lee

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  • Gloria Lee
    #3363 - Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - Editor: Gloria Lee Nonduality Highlights - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights Nonviolence Nonviolence belongs to
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      #3363 - Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - Editor: Gloria Lee
      Nonduality Highlights
      - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDhighlights 

       

       

      Nonviolence

      Nonviolence belongs to a continuum from the personal to the global, and from the global to the personal. One of the most significant Buddhist interpretations of nonviolence concerns the application of this ideal to daily life. Nonviolence is not some exalted regimen that can be practiced only by a monk or a master; it also pertains to the way one interacts with a child, vacuums a carpet, or waits in line. Besides the more obvious forms of violence, whenever we separate ourselves from a given situation (for example, through inattentiveness, negative judgments, or impatience), we "kill" something valuable. However subtle it may be, such violence actually leaves victims in its wake: people, things, one's own composure, the moment itself. According to the Buddhist reckoning, these small-scale incidences of violence accumulate relentlessly, are multiplied on a social level, and become a source of the large-scale violence that can sweep down upon us so suddenly. . . . One need not wait until war is declared and bullets are flying to work for peace, Buddhism teaches. A more constant and equally urgent battle must be waged each day against the forces of one's own anger, carelessness, and self-absorption.

      - Kenneth Kraft, Inner Peace, World Peace


      Developing the capacity for clear light dreams is similar to developing the capacity of abiding in the non-dual presence of rigpa during the day.  In the beginning, rigpa and thought seem different, so that in the experience of rigpa there is no thought, and if thought arises we are distracted and lose rigpa.  But when stabliity in rigpa is developed, thought simply arises and dissolves without in the least obscuring rigpa; the practitioner remains in non-dual awareness.

      Source: The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep, Page: 63

      posted to Wisdom-l by Mark Scorelle


      "Welcome to the tavern where

      drunkards get sober and transparent,

      until they disappear altogether in the face of

      the one they love.

       

      Whatever loosens the taste of their joy

      comes new with each breath.

       

      In this orchard, and in the gardens we farm,

      there's no summer or winter.

       

      Roses open every direction.

       

      This world's existence is one long night.

       

      There's a great lively gathering that night,

       but some people sleep through it.

       

      Any one who has seen the Beloved wonders,

      'Where are all the others?'

       

      This has nothing to do with

      thinking and belief.

       

      From now on,

      you'll have no friend,

      no form to love,

       

      only what's real."

       

       

      ~Rumi
       
      posted by Bob O'Hearn
       

      An Experiment

      Let's try an experiment. Pick up a coin. Imagine that it represents the object at which you are grasping. Hold it tightly clutched in your fist and extend your arm, with the palm of your hand facing the ground. Now if you let go or relax your grip, you will lose what you are clinging onto. That's why you hold on.

      But there's another possibility: You can let go and yet keep hold of it. With your arm still outstretched, turn your hand so that it faces the sky. Release your hand and the coin still rests on your open palm. You let go. And the coin is still yours, even with all this space around it.

      So there is a way in which we can accept impermanence and still relish life, at one and the same time, without grasping.

      -Sogyal Rinpoche, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying


       
      Thanksgiving
       
      I have been trying to read
      the script cut in these hills—
      a language carved in the shimmer of stubble
      and the solid lines of soil, spoken
      in the thud of apples falling
      and the rasp of corn stalks finally bare.
       
      The pheasants shout it with a rusty creak
      as they gather in the fallen grain,
      the blackbirds sing it
      over their shoulders in parting,
      and gold leaf illuminates the manuscript
      where it is written in the trees.
       
      Transcribed onto my human tongue
      I believe it might sound like a lullaby,
      or the simplest grace at table.
      Across the gathering stillness
      simply this: "For all that we have received,
      dear God, make us truly grateful."
       
      ~ Lynn Ungar ~
       
       
      (Blessing the Bread)
       

       
       
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