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clarification re: palliation vs suppression

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  • Yinhsu Liu
    Dear all, I d appreciate if I can get feedback/clarification on the differences between palliation and suppression in general as well as they relate to
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 3, 2006
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      Dear all,

      I'd appreciate if I can get feedback/clarification on the differences between "palliation" and "suppression" in general as well as they relate to acute vs. chronic illnesses.  It's been explained in class and lab and I've taken notes and reviewed them.  However, for whatever reason, I still have trouble grasping the concepts.

      Please help!  Thank you!

      Yinhsu Liu
      Bastyr ND I
    • DrZeff@AOL.com
      Dear Yinhsu, Palliation is the mitigation of symptoms without actual healing, to reduce or moderate the intensity of symptoms. Suppression, from the Latin,
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 3, 2006
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        Dear Yinhsu,
         
            Palliation is the mitigation of symptoms without actual healing, to reduce or moderate the intensity of symptoms. Suppression, from the Latin, "to press under" is a different phenomenon.  If the peasants are hungry and you give them bread, but do not alleviate the conditions that caused the hunger, you reduce their hunger temporarily.  If you shoot at them and force them to run and hide, you do not ease their hunger, and yo make them angry and afraid, so they are liable to revolt.  If a person is dying and you give morphine to relieve pain, you are not dealing with the cause, but you are palliating the symptom of pain with little consequence to the patient other than easing the suffering.  If a child has a headache from tension or fatigue, and you give an aspirin, you may relieve the headache with little consequence.  If the child has a fever an you give the aspirin to relieve the fever, you have disrupted the healing process that the fever is a manifestation of, and have suppressed the healing process.  The problem with suppression is that there are potential and actual consequences.  Reyes syndrome is one example of this.  So may be Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura.  Another example.  If the child has chronic ear infections, and you give antibiotics each time, you have done nothing to undo the cause of the ear infections, which is almost always dietary.  The problem is accumulated toxemia.  The toxemia is doing other damage over time, including causing recurrence of the ear infections, which will either result in damage to the ear drum, or the insertion of drainage tubes through the ear drum.  the antibiotics do not improve the health of the child, and may actually damage it.  The dietary change, on the other hand, will not only be curative, but will result in a healthier child. especially when combined with hydrotherapy and an appropriate homeopathic medicine. 
            If you recall the diagram of the "process of healing" (cf. Journal of Naturopathic Medicine, Vol 7, #1, 1997).  You can see the origin of chronic disease is, in part, due to the suppression of acute disease reactions the body mounts in a curative attempt.  Suppression is a major cause of chronic disease.  Taking an aspirin for an occasional headache, or giving morphine to relieve chronic pain does not have that effect.  Hence, the difference between palliation and suppression.
         
        Jared Zeff, ND
        Aslmon Creek, WA       
      • William Mitchell
        Hi Yinhsu, If you have a mosquito bite and you put plantain salve on it, the itching goes down. You have palliated the bite. If you have a toxic reaction to
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 4, 2006
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          Hi Yinhsu,

          If you have a mosquito bite and you put plantain salve on it, the itching goes down.  You have palliated the bite.    

          If you have a toxic reaction to Lomatium and have a body rash and you put cortisone ointment on it and take prednisone, you have supressed the reaction the body is having to the toxin.  You have supressed the reaction.  The reaction is part of how the body is trying to detoxify.

          If you plug up a drainage reaction, you are supressing a natural body function and it can be dangerous to do so. 

          Palliation doesnt block anything up. 

          While this is but one explanation, I hope it helps.

          Bill Mitchell, ND



           


          From: "Yinhsu Liu" <yinhsu.liu@...>
          Reply-To: NDPhilosophy@yahoogroups.com
          To: NDPhilosophy@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [NDPhilosophy] clarification re: palliation vs suppression
          Date: Sun, 3 Dec 2006 13:15:25 -0800

          Dear all,

          I'd appreciate if I can get feedback/clarificat ion on the differences between "palliation" and "suppression" in general as well as they relate to acute vs. chronic illnesses.  It's been explained in class and lab and I've taken notes and reviewed them.  However, for whatever reason, I still have trouble grasping the concepts.

          Please help!  Thank you!

          Yinhsu Liu
          Bastyr ND I




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        • tarapeyman
          I just want to express my thanks to Bill Mitchell and Jared Zeff for commenting on this distinction between palliation and suppression. Very helpful. Have a
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 20, 2006
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            I just want to express my thanks to Bill Mitchell and Jared Zeff for commenting on this
            distinction between palliation and suppression. Very helpful.

            Have a wonderful holiday,
            Tara Peyman
            SCNM student
            Phoenix, AZ
          • William Mitchell
            Merry Christmas Tara and a happy new year. I hope your new year is filled with miracles. Bill From: tarapeyman Reply-To:
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 20, 2006
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              Merry Christmas Tara and a happy new year.  I hope your new year is filled with miracles.

              Bill


              From: "tarapeyman" <tarapeyman@...>
              Reply-To: NDPhilosophy@yahoogroups.com
              To: NDPhilosophy@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [NDPhilosophy] Re: clarification re: palliation vs suppression
              Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 17:29:52 -0000

              I just want to express my thanks to Bill Mitchell and Jared Zeff for commenting on this
              distinction between palliation and suppression. Very helpful.

              Have a wonderful holiday,
              Tara Peyman
              SCNM student
              Phoenix, AZ




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            • William Franklin
              Hello everyone, I d like to dig a little deeper into this topic. Are we saying then that pain is not a necessary part of the healing process and relieving it
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 25, 2007
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                Hello everyone,
                 
                I'd like to dig a little deeper into this topic. 
                 
                Are we saying then that pain is not a necessary part of the healing process and relieving it doesn't negatively impact the outcome?  but the other symptoms such as drainage or fever are important and shouldn't be interfered with?  I ask this from the perspective that it is often said people will not change until the current pain is greater than the percieved/anticipated pain of change.  If this is the case, is relieving pain (palliatively) actually allowing a person to remain comfortable in an unhealthy circumstance or lifestyle? And if so, isn't this delaying the necessary changes to a more healthy position in life/way of living? the healing of the patient?
                 
                I understand that if we can't relieve a bit of the suffering quickly the patient probably won't return for a followup or comply to the treatment.  On the other hand, aren't there avenues to cure which would act quickly to lower the symptomatic picture in it's entirety without suppressing just the pain?  If so, is it in our patient's best interest to suppress pain, while declaring it to be only palliative to the disease process?  [again, isn't the pain part of the disease process too?] 
                 
                My experience has been the pain (whether physical, emotional, or spiritual) I did not palliate/suppress took me to a state of mind where I healed on a much deeper level and the recurrent problem ceased to recur.  Attempts over the years to palliate the pain so I could focus on the problem (as I saw it from my limited perspective) hadn't gotten me anywhere.  I've also seen this in the very few of my friends who were willing to stay awake to the entire process. 
                 
                Thanks for your time,
                William Franklin
                SCNM student


                DrZeff@... wrote:
                Dear Yinhsu,
                 
                    Palliation is the mitigation of symptoms without actual healing, to reduce or moderate the intensity of symptoms. Suppression, from the Latin, "to press under" is a different phenomenon.  If the peasants are hungry and you give them bread, but do not alleviate the conditions that caused the hunger, you reduce their hunger temporarily.  If you shoot at them and force them to run and hide, you do not ease their hunger, and yo make them angry and afraid, so they are liable to revolt.  If a person is dying and you give morphine to relieve pain, you are not dealing with the cause, but you are palliating the symptom of pain with little consequence to the patient other than easing the suffering.  If a child has a headache from tension or fatigue, and you give an aspirin, you may relieve the headache with little consequence.  If the child has a fever an you give the aspirin to relieve the fever, you have disrupted the healing process that the fever is a manifestation of, and have suppressed the healing process.  The problem with suppression is that there are potential and actual consequences.  Reyes syndrome is one example of this.  So may be Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura.  Another example.  If the child has chronic ear infections, and you give antibiotics each time, you have done nothing to undo the cause of the ear infections, which is almost always dietary.  The problem is accumulated toxemia.  The toxemia is doing other damage over time, including causing recurrence of the ear infections, which will either result in damage to the ear drum, or the insertion of drainage tubes through the ear drum.  the antibiotics do not improve the health of the child, and may actually damage it.  The dietary change, on the other hand, will not only be curative, but will result in a healthier child. especially when combined with hydrotherapy and an appropriate homeopathic medicine. 
                    If you recall the diagram of the "process of healing" (cf. Journal of Naturopathic Medicine, Vol 7, #1, 1997).  You can see the origin of chronic disease is, in part, due to the suppression of acute disease reactions the body mounts in a curative attempt.  Suppression is a major cause of chronic disease.  Taking an aspirin for an occasional headache, or giving morphine to relieve chronic pain does not have that effect.  Hence, the difference between palliation and suppression.
                 
                Jared Zeff, ND
                Aslmon Creek, WA       



                William Franklin
                SCNM Student

                "How can a man find a sensible way to live? One way and one only – Philosophy. And my philosophy means keeping that vital spark within you free from damage and degradation, using it to transcend pain and pleasure, doing everything with a purpose, avoiding lies and hypocrisy, not relying on another person’s actions or failings. To accept everything that comes, and everything that is given, as coming from that same spiritual source." --Marcus Aurelius


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              • Chance Diebold, ND
                Hi William - I don t think that healing and relieving pain are mutually exclusive, nor do I believe that the same answer will be true for every individual who
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 27, 2007
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                  Hi William –

                   

                  I don’t think that healing and relieving pain are mutually exclusive, nor do I believe that the same answer will be true for every individual who shows up in our offices.  One person’s pain may be caused by a physical obstacle of cure – a broken bone for example – while another may be more emotional – like the tension headache – where a massage can alleviate both the pain and open a window to further exploration of the cause (tension).  We also need to consider the individual, and on all levels.  Is the patient a spunky ten year old, with a robust constitution that will withstand wet socks and extended healing time?  Or is it a frail 60 year old, with a lifetime of suppression and systemic bacteria?  Is the first time OM of a two year old mild enough, and her mother strong enough to use herbs to cure and diet to forestall?  Or do we need to alleviate the infection causing the pain in order to allow changes, palliating and educating along the way?  Is giving armor thyroid to the woman whose voice has been taken away via emotional abuse palliative?  Is lithium palliative to the OCD child living in an over-farmed and depleted environment?

                   

                  I think the art of what we do comes in when we learn to understand individual differences and how each difference leads to a different plan.  I think sometimes we do need to offer relief, whereas other times outcomes and consequences are more educational.  I think each person is different, and in seeing and honoring those differences comes true change and healing.  I also think that many of us have long paths and many experiences along our own road to healing, but that it is a mistake to think our patients share our dedication.  We have to remember that, no matter what we have been through personally, it has absolutely nothing to do with the healing path of another.  We need to be compassionate and patient with others as they learn and find their own way, and remember that we are teachers before all else.

                   

                  Chance Diebold , ND

                  Wilmington, NC

                  http://DrDiebold.com


                  From: NDPhilosophy@yahoogroups.com [mailto:NDPhilosophy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William Franklin
                  Sent: Sunday, February 25, 2007 4:23 PM
                  To: NDPhilosophy@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [NDPhilosophy] clarification re: palliation vs suppression

                   

                  Hello everyone,

                   

                  I'd like to dig a little deeper into this topic. 

                   

                  Are we saying then that pain is not a necessary part of the healing process and relieving it doesn't negatively impact the outcome?  but the other symptoms such as drainage or fever are important and shouldn't be interfered with?  I ask this from the perspective that it is often said people will not change until the current pain is greater than the percieved/anticipated pain of change.  If this is the case, is relieving pain (palliatively) actually allowing a person to remain comfortable in an unhealthy circumstance or lifestyle? And if so, isn't this delaying the necessary changes to a more healthy position in life/way of living? the healing of the patient?

                   

                  I understand that if we can't relieve a bit of the suffering quickly the patient probably won't return for a followup or comply to the treatment.  On the other hand, aren't there avenues to cure which would act quickly to lower the symptomatic picture in it's entirety without suppressing just the pain?  If so, is it in our patient's best interest to suppress pain, while declaring it to be only palliative to the disease process?  [again, isn't the pain part of the disease process too?] 

                   

                  My experience has been the pain (whether physical, emotional, or spiritual) I did not palliate/suppress took me to a state of mind where I healed on a much deeper level and the recurrent problem ceased to recur.  Attempts over the years to palliate the pain so I could focus on the problem (as I saw it from my limited perspective) hadn't gotten me anywhere.  I've also seen this in the very few of my friends who were willing to stay awake to the entire process. 

                   

                  Thanks for your time,

                  William Franklin

                  SCNM student



                  DrZeff@... wrote:

                  Dear Yinhsu,

                   

                      Palliation is the mitigation of symptoms without actual healing, to reduce or moderate the intensity of symptoms. Suppression, from the Latin, "to press under" is a different phenomenon.  If the peasants are hungry and you give them bread, but do not alleviate the conditions that caused the hunger, you reduce their hunger temporarily.  If you shoot at them and force them to run and hide, you do not ease their hunger, and yo make them angry and afraid, so they are liable to revolt.  If a person is dying and you give morphine to relieve pain, you are not dealing with the cause, but you are palliating the symptom of pain with little consequence to the patient other than easing the suffering.  If a child has a headache from tension or fatigue, and you give an aspirin, you may relieve the headache with little consequence.  If the child has a fever an you give the aspirin to relieve the fever, you have disrupted the healing process that the fever is a manifestation of, and have suppressed the healing process.  The problem with suppression is that there are potential and actual consequences.  Reyes syndrome is one example of this.  So may be Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura.  Another example.  If the child has chronic ear infections, and you give antibiotics each time, you have done nothing to undo the cause of the ear infections, which is almost always dietary.  The problem is accumulated toxemia.  The toxemia is doing other damage over time, including causing recurrence of the ear infections, which will either result in damage to the ear drum, or the insertion of drainage tubes through the ear drum.  the antibiotics do not improve the health of the child, and may actually damage it.  The dietary change, on the other hand, will not only be curative, but will result in a healthier child. especially when combined with hydrotherapy and an appropriate homeopathic medicine. 

                      If you recall the diagram of the "process of healing" (cf. Journal of Naturopathic Medicine, Vol 7, #1, 1997).  You can see the origin of chronic disease is, in part, due to the suppression of acute disease reactions the body mounts in a curative attempt.  Suppression is a major cause of chronic disease.  Taking an aspirin for an occasional headache, or giving morphine to relieve chronic pain does not have that effect.  Hence, the difference between palliation and suppression.

                   

                  Jared Zeff, ND

                  Aslmon Creek, WA       




                  William Franklin
                  SCNM Student

                  "How can a man find a sensible way to live? One way and one only – Philosophy. And my philosophy means keeping that vital spark within you free from damage and degradation, using it to transcend pain and pleasure, doing everything with a purpose, avoiding lies and hypocrisy, not relying on another person’s actions or failings. To accept everything that comes, and everything that is given, as coming from that same spiritual source." --Marcus Aurelius

                   


                  We won't tell. Get more on shows you hate to love
                  (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV's Guilty Pleasures list.

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