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Re: ?colors question

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  • Andrew Brandon
    Mike, I should have combined these in two messages but oh well. As far as I have found thus far, the depots were a form of Oxide Red, one of these days I ll
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 9, 2008
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      Mike,

      I should have combined these in two messages but oh well.

      As far as I have found thus far, the depots were a form of Oxide Red,
      one of these days I'll get around to making some color samples for
      things but spare time is a luxury I don't have these days.

      As far as roofs are concerned: Coaches originally would have had
      wooden roofs with a metal covering created out of small sheets which
      are soldered together as was standard practice for coach builders. The
      original passenger cars would have carried these roofs most of their
      lives. Grass Valley built coaches I am not sure about the roof
      construction on however in the later years they do appear to have a
      tar paper covering. The last group of second hand coaches would have
      had metal coverings.
      An example of what these metal coverings on the roof should look like
      is here: http://archive.mylargescale.com/articles/masterclass/carterbros/photogallery/MSV-11.jpg

      Only in unique circumstances would tar paper and/or canvas been used
      on a coach roof on a post Civil War railroad, in the earlier days of
      railroading such materials were common. Cars such as the shop built
      coaches would have been likely to have a tar paper or canvas roof such
      as the picnic cars did.
      As for boxcars, when you say 100 series you are referring to the F&CC
      boxcars, these cars were built with double sheathed wooden roofs with
      an interior metal roof similar to an early Murphy style roof. The
      reason for this was to make the cars as water tight as possible
      however I recall there being none with tar paper or any other covering
      on the top of the roof. Beyond the shop built passenger cars in later
      years, the caboose and the rotary snow plow I can think of no other
      pieces of equipment that had tar paper. The picnic cars and the
      Calhoun cars would have likely had stretched and painted canvas roofs
      with the canvas being painted to either match the body color or in a
      lighter contrasting color.

      -Andrew-
    • Greg Maxwell
      Mike and Andrew, I believe that the oxide red color would only apply to the new depot at Nevada City. From about 1910 on all depots were painted in the two
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 9, 2008
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        Mike and Andrew,
        I believe that the oxide red color would only apply to the new depot
        at Nevada City. From about 1910 on all depots were painted in the two
        tone gray paint scheme used by the parent OA&E.
        Best regards,
        Greg Maxwell
        West Linn, OR


        --- In NCNGRR@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew Brandon" <andrew.brandon@...> >
        As far as I have found thus far, the depots were a form of Oxide Red,
        > one of these days I'll get around to making some color samples for
        > things but spare time is a luxury I don't have these days.
      • Andrew Brandon
        Greg, That is right! That slipped my mind earlier. -Andrew-
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 9, 2008
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          Greg,

          That is right! That slipped my mind earlier.

          -Andrew-
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