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Notes from the National Championships in Bend, Or.

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  • Ted Fisher
    I just got back from Bend where I worked as an official at the Natz. While it was a great learning experience there are a couple of things I want to share.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2010
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      I just got back from Bend where I worked as an official at the Natz. While it was a great learning experience there are a couple of things I want to share.
       
      1. There were times when it was very hard to see the riders numbers because they had been folded, wrinkled or crushed. As a racer you might think that mutilating the number gives you some kind of advantage but it doesn't seem too. All it does it makes it harder for the officials to identify you during a race. The problem is actually bad enough that there is a rule about it. 1N7. Racing numbers. (b) (riders with misplaced, obscured or unreadable numbers will not be placed). If shoulder or frame numbers are provided, they too shall be placed as prescribed. Numbers may not be folded, trimmed, crumpled, or otherwise defaced. So the Question is; Should officials start enforcing this rule?
       
      2.  The other thing I want to mention is the Turn Around (TA) on the TT. The TA was clearly marked with signage, cones, a tent, table and chairs, all basically in the middle of nowhere. Yet some riders couldn't identify the turn around and even more had no idea how to handle it. There were riders who turned just before the cone and we had to have them do it  correctly. Some tried to go around the cone on the wrong side of the road while others had obviously never practiced going around a cone at all. Those who had practice were in and out very quickly. While you might think a TT is relatively simple, it is not. I am sure some places were lost because of poor technique. If you don't now how to manage a TA, find a coach who does. He/she can save you a lot of time.
       
      Ted Fisher
    • Ryan
      Ted, Thank you for sharing your experiences at Nationals. A point of clarification: The officials enforce the rules at all times. We want to place everyone on
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 1, 2010
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        Ted, Thank you for sharing your experiences at Nationals.

        A point of clarification: The officials enforce the rules at all times.

        We want to place everyone on the line. When numbers are hard to read, it slows everyone-- riders, promoters, officials-- from being able to get the results and prizes delivered out on time.

        Let's use this as an opportunity to encourage club leaders/mentors to help each others' riders have their numbers placed correctly prior to race start or to use as discussion topic during a team rider/meeting etc... Ensuring proper number placement prior to the start may avoid unnecessary delays when officials have to hold everyone until a rider has their number re-pinned.

        Here is a website sharing some examples of good ... and bad
        http://www.obra.org/number_placement.html

        Thanks,
        Ryan


        --- In NCNCA@yahoogroups.com, Ted Fisher <fisherwc@...> wrote:
        >
        > I just got back from Bend where I worked as an official at the Natz. While it was a great learning experience there are a couple of things I want to share.
        >  
        > 1. There were times when it was very hard to see the riders numbers because they had been folded, wrinkled or crushed. As a racer you might think that mutilating the number gives you some kind of advantage but it doesn't seem too. All it does it makes it harder for the officials to identify you during a race. The problem is actually bad enough that there is a rule about it. 1N7. Racing numbers. (b) (riders with misplaced, obscured or unreadable numbers will not be placed). If shoulder or frame numbers are provided, they too shall be placed as prescribed. Numbers may not be folded, trimmed, crumpled, or otherwise defaced. So the Question is; Should officials start enforcing this rule?
        >  
        > 2.  The other thing I want to mention is the Turn Around (TA) on the TT. The TA was clearly marked with signage, cones, a tent, table and chairs, all basically in the middle of nowhere. Yet some riders couldn't identify the turn around and even more had no idea how to handle it. There were riders who turned just before the cone and we had to have them do it  correctly. Some tried to go around the cone on the wrong side of the road while others had obviously never practiced going around a cone at all. Those who had practice were in and out very quickly. While you might think a TT is relatively simple, it is not. I am sure some places were lost because of poor technique. If you don't now how to manage a TA, find a coach who does. He/she can save you a lot of time.
        >  
        > Ted Fisher
        >
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