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RE: [NARCDC] Bio-char or Agri-char

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  • Shy, Marilyn - Marquette, MI
    Here is a forwarded link to a video (11 min) about the benefits of charcoal in a soil. It is geared towards ag soils but the principles would apply to forest
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Here is a forwarded link to a  video (11 min) about the benefits of charcoal in a soil.  It is geared towards ag soils but the principles would apply to forest soils.  At some point we may need to consider this in our analysis for Rx burning.

      Meredith Webster
      USDA Forest Service
      Northern Region Soil Scientist
      406-329-3412

      ----- Forwarded by Meredith M Webster/WO/USDAFS on 01/22/2009 08:05 AM -----
      David Atkins/R1/USDAFS

      01/21/2009 04:42 PM

      To
      James F Morrison/R1/USDAFS@FSNOTES
      cc
      pdl r1 climate discussion group@FSNOTES
      Subject
      Re: Reading Group meeting this FridayLink




      http://www.venearth.com/hqpromise.html

      Check out this url to access an 11 min video that talks about biomass energy and biochar.


      Dave Atkins
      Fuels for Schools Program Manager
      200 E. Broadway
      Box 7669
      Missoula, MT  59807
      (406) 329-3134
      FAX (406) 329-3132
      e-mail: datkins@...





       

      Marilyn Shy, Resource Conservation & Development Coordinator
      USDA-NRCS
      Assisting the Upper Peninsula RC&D Council
      780 Commerce Dr., Suite C
      Marquette, MI 49855
      ph (906)226-8871, ext. 124
      marilyn.shy@...

       


      From: NARCDC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:NARCDC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of uintaheadwaters
      Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 12:46 PM
      To: NARCDC@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [NARCDC] Bio-char or Agri-char

      I have had some interesting conversations with folks on bio-char and
      its ability to improve soils. A lot of research has been done in
      and around tropical climates to improve the soils there. There are
      also some folks making chicken litter into char and applying it to
      cropland. The general idea is that the char creates an
      environment that promotes microorganism activity and retention,
      giving them a surface to hold on to. As a result, along with
      fertilizer and nutrient application, the yield is greatly increased
      and organic matter is increased in the soil. The other benefit to
      the process is that creating char reduces the carbon released into
      the air -- improving air quality. American Indians used char in
      their farming operations and last month's Mother Earth News talked
      about creating char by burning crops then smothering them with soil
      and letting the char develop.

      Increases organic matter, increases yield, cuts down on air
      pollution -- sounds too good to be true, doesn't it?

      Are there any councils working on a char project in their area? Are
      there any NRCS offices that have incorporated char into the Tech
      Guide? Is char for real? I would love to hear your thoughts and
      especially if someone has some experience working with char.

      Barb Carey
      RC&D Coordinator, Uinta Headwaters RC&D, Heber City, UT
      barbara.carey@ ut.usda.gov
      435-654-7239

    • Williams, Kevin - Cedar City, UT
      Jim, I got your phone message -- did not want to call your house at 7:00 am -- I am headed to Milford for a Renewable/Alternative energy fair this morning
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 2, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Jim,
         
        I got your phone message -- did not want to call your house at 7:00 am -- I am headed to Milford for a Renewable/Alternative energy fair this morning (figured I need to start getting up to speed with that), then on to Santa Clara for a watershed/water use field trip sponsored by Army Corps of Engineers and various partners in the afternoon.  I may head back down there tomorrow, maybe not.
         
        I still need to get Wendy in for the financial report for next week's meeting.  Three weeks ago I explained to her what we needed, and she was going to work on it, but she seems busier than usual right now with tax season.
         
        Other than that I have been working on getting all our CWMA GIP grant proposals ready for submission, and the various fires that pop up along the way.
         
        I met with Sheldon and Kris Johnson Tuesday at the Virgin River program meeting -- had them take me down to the SWWF habitat project.  Looks like we need a current bird survey, and some map and plan updates then we will be able to move forward with that Safe Harbor agreement.  I plan to approach Sheldon about the RC&D council membership, just trying to build a bond there first.  I think he is in the process of turning over his business(es) to his sons, so he'll probably need something to do.
         
        Kevin
         

        ================================

        Kevin Williams
        Color Country RC&D Coordinator
        2390 West Highway 56  Suite 14a
        Cedar City, UT  84720
        tel: 435-586-2429  x13
        cell: 435-559-5128
        fax: 435-586-0649
        e-mail: kevin.williams@...
        ================================

         


        From: NARCDC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:NARCDC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Shy, Marilyn - Marquette, MI
        Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 12:22 PM
        To: NARCDC@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [NARCDC] Bio-char or Agri-char

        Here is a forwarded link to a  video (11 min) about the benefits of charcoal in a soil.  It is geared towards ag soils but the principles would apply to forest soils.  At some point we may need to consider this in our analysis for Rx burning.

        Meredith Webster
        USDA Forest Service
        Northern Region Soil Scientist
        406-329-3412

        ----- Forwarded by Meredith M Webster/WO/USDAFS on 01/22/2009 08:05 AM -----
        David Atkins/R1/USDAFS

        01/21/2009 04:42 PM

        To
        James F Morrison/R1/ USDAFS@FSNOTES
        cc
        pdl r1 climate discussion group@FSNOTES
        Subject
        Re: Reading Group meeting this FridayLink




        http://www.venearth .com/hqpromise. html

        Check out this url to access an 11 min video that talks about biomass energy and biochar.


        Dave Atkins
        Fuels for Schools Program Manager
        200 E. Broadway
        Box 7669
        Missoula, MT  59807
        (406) 329-3134
        FAX (406) 329-3132
        e-mail: datkins@.... us





         

        Marilyn Shy, Resource Conservation & Development Coordinator
        USDA-NRCS
        Assisting the Upper Peninsula RC&D Council
        780 Commerce Dr., Suite C
        Marquette, MI 49855
        ph (906)226-8871, ext. 124
        marilyn.shy@ mi.usda.gov

         


        From: NARCDC@yahoogroups. com [mailto:NARCDC@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of uintaheadwaters
        Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 12:46 PM
        To: NARCDC@yahoogroups. com
        Subject: [NARCDC] Bio-char or Agri-char

        I have had some interesting conversations with folks on bio-char and
        its ability to improve soils. A lot of research has been done in
        and around tropical climates to improve the soils there. There are
        also some folks making chicken litter into char and applying it to
        cropland. The general idea is that the char creates an
        environment that promotes microorganism activity and retention,
        giving them a surface to hold on to. As a result, along with
        fertilizer and nutrient application, the yield is greatly increased
        and organic matter is increased in the soil. The other benefit to
        the process is that creating char reduces the carbon released into
        the air -- improving air quality. American Indians used char in
        their farming operations and last month's Mother Earth News talked
        about creating char by burning crops then smothering them with soil
        and letting the char develop.

        Increases organic matter, increases yield, cuts down on air
        pollution -- sounds too good to be true, doesn't it?

        Are there any councils working on a char project in their area? Are
        there any NRCS offices that have incorporated char into the Tech
        Guide? Is char for real? I would love to hear your thoughts and
        especially if someone has some experience working with char.

        Barb Carey
        RC&D Coordinator, Uinta Headwaters RC&D, Heber City, UT
        barbara.carey@ ut.usda.gov
        435-654-7239

      • donald falvey
        Kevin-   Don t think you meant to send this to the NARCD list serve.   On another issue- I have your name on my list of UARCD contacts so you are
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 3, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Kevin-
           
          Don't think you meant to send this to the NARCD list serve.
           
          On another issue-
          I have your name on my list of UARCD contacts so you are automatically included when I forward the NARCDC emails to our Utah RC&D folks. I can delete your name from that list if you want me to although I want to make sure you are included on other UARCD emails.
           
          Don

          --- On Thu, 4/2/09, Williams, Kevin - Cedar City, UT <kevin.williams@...> wrote:
          From: Williams, Kevin - Cedar City, UT <kevin.williams@...>
          Subject: RE: [NARCDC] Bio-char or Agri-char
          To: NARCDC@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, April 2, 2009, 7:31 AM

          Jim,
           
          I got your phone message -- did not want to call your house at 7:00 am -- I am headed to Milford for a Renewable/Alternati ve energy fair this morning (figured I need to start getting up to speed with that), then on to Santa Clara for a watershed/water use field trip sponsored by Army Corps of Engineers and various partners in the afternoon.  I may head back down there tomorrow, maybe not.
           
          I still need to get Wendy in for the financial report for next week's meeting.  Three weeks ago I explained to her what we needed, and she was going to work on it, but she seems busier than usual right now with tax season.
           
          Other than that I have been working on getting all our CWMA GIP grant proposals ready for submission, and the various fires that pop up along the way.
           
          I met with Sheldon and Kris Johnson Tuesday at the Virgin River program meeting -- had them take me down to the SWWF habitat project.  Looks like we need a current bird survey, and some map and plan updates then we will be able to move forward with that Safe Harbor agreement.  I plan to approach Sheldon about the RC&D council membership, just trying to build a bond there first.  I think he is in the process of turning over his business(es) to his sons, so he'll probably need something to do.
           
          Kevin
           
          ============ ========= ========= ==
          Kevin Williams
          Color Country RC&D Coordinator
          2390 West Highway 56  Suite 14a
          Cedar City, UT  84720
          tel: 435-586-2429  x13
          cell: 435-559-5128
          fax: 435-586-0649
          e-mail: kevin.williams@ ut.usda.gov
          ============ ========= ========= ==
           


          From: NARCDC@yahoogroups. com [mailto:NARCDC@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Shy, Marilyn - Marquette, MI
          Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 12:22 PM
          To: NARCDC@yahoogroups. com
          Subject: RE: [NARCDC] Bio-char or Agri-char

          Here is a forwarded link to a  video (11 min) about the benefits of charcoal in a soil.  It is geared towards ag soils but the principles would apply to forest soils.  At some point we may need to consider this in our analysis for Rx burning.

          Meredith Webster
          USDA Forest Service
          Northern Region Soil Scientist
          406-329-3412

          ----- Forwarded by Meredith M Webster/WO/USDAFS on 01/22/2009 08:05 AM -----
          David Atkins/R1/USDAFS
          01/21/2009 04:42 PM
          To
          James F Morrison/R1/ USDAFS@FSNOTES
          cc
          pdl r1 climate discussion group@FSNOTES
          Subject
          Re: Reading Group meeting this FridayLink




          http://www.venearth .com/hqpromise. html

          Check out this url to access an 11 min video that talks about biomass energy and biochar.


          Dave Atkins
          Fuels for Schools Program Manager
          200 E. Broadway
          Box 7669
          Missoula, MT  59807
          (406) 329-3134
          FAX (406) 329-3132
          e-mail: datkins@.... us





           
          Marilyn Shy, Resource Conservation & Development Coordinator
          USDA-NRCS
          Assisting the Upper Peninsula RC&D Council
          780 Commerce Dr., Suite C
          Marquette, MI 49855
          ph (906)226-8871, ext. 124
          marilyn.shy@ mi.usda.gov
           


          From: NARCDC@yahoogroups. com [mailto:NARCDC@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of uintaheadwaters
          Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 12:46 PM
          To: NARCDC@yahoogroups. com
          Subject: [NARCDC] Bio-char or Agri-char

          I have had some interesting conversations with folks on bio-char and
          its ability to improve soils. A lot of research has been done in
          and around tropical climates to improve the soils there. There are
          also some folks making chicken litter into char and applying it to
          cropland. The general idea is that the char creates an
          environment that promotes microorganism activity and retention,
          giving them a surface to hold on to. As a result, along with
          fertilizer and nutrient application, the yield is greatly increased
          and organic matter is increased in the soil. The other benefit to
          the process is that creating char reduces the carbon released into
          the air -- improving air quality. American Indians used char in
          their farming operations and last month's Mother Earth News talked
          about creating char by burning crops then smothering them with soil
          and letting the char develop.

          Increases organic matter, increases yield, cuts down on air
          pollution -- sounds too good to be true, doesn't it?

          Are there any councils working on a char project in their area? Are
          there any NRCS offices that have incorporated char into the Tech
          Guide? Is char for real? I would love to hear your thoughts and
          especially if someone has some experience working with char.

          Barb Carey
          RC&D Coordinator, Uinta Headwaters RC&D, Heber City, UT
          barbara.carey@ ut.usda.gov
          435-654-7239


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