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Re: [N1MM] Re: Ic-706MKIIG

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  • Ed K1EP
    ... Sorry, I guess I was just as bad. What I meant to say was, Yaesu was the only radio I know of. Actually I probably do know of others, but I have lost
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 2, 2006
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      At 7/2/2006 12:34 PM, Robert Chudek - K0RC wrote:
      >Careful Ed, please don't propagate the idea that Yaesu is the "only" radio that requires 2 stop bits. The Kenwood TS-950 series requires 4800, 8, N, 2 parameters for proper operation. I'm 99% confident the TS-450 and TS-690 also run with these parameters. (I don't have those manuals in the shack to verify this.)

      Sorry, I guess I was just as bad. What I meant to say was, Yaesu was the only radio I know of. Actually I probably do know of others, but I have lost those brain cells.

      The problem is that if the radio is only sending 1 stop bit and the computer is expecting to see 2, the computer will drop data, probably after the first data byte. When you have slower data speeds and there is a lot of streaming data (e.g. you are spinning the tuning knob and the radio is sending frequency data) being sent, there are no gaps between the data. The radio will send start bit, 8 bits of data, stop bit, start bit, 8 bits of data, stop bit, etc. The computer will be looking for a second stop bit which will be the start bit of the next byte. But after that, the byte will be corrupt. It may or may not sync back up after the second byte. You can therefore see that you can lose a lot of your data in this situation. What is characteristic of this problem, is that transmission from the computer to the radio is fine, because an extra stop bit is no problem for the radio. It just makes the overall throughput 10% slower. So, usually the user complains about the fact that he or she can send commands to the radio just fine, but the computer sometimes can't tell when the radio changes frequency.
    • Ed K1EP
      One point of clarification for those who really want to get precise here. I said that the start bit of the second byte will appear to be the second stop bit.
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 2, 2006
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        One point of clarification for those who really want to get precise here. I said that the start bit of the second byte will appear to be the second stop bit. The start bit is a 0 and the stop bit is a 1. However, in some common implementations of RS-232, the second stop bit is not actually checked (to be a 0 or 1), rather, that time period is just waited before looking for the start bit for the next word.


        >At 7/2/2006 12:34 PM, Robert Chudek - K0RC wrote:
        >>Careful Ed, please don't propagate the idea that Yaesu is the "only" radio that requires 2 stop bits. The Kenwood TS-950 series requires 4800, 8, N, 2 parameters for proper operation. I'm 99% confident the TS-450 and TS-690 also run with these parameters. (I don't have those manuals in the shack to verify this.)
        >
        >Sorry, I guess I was just as bad. What I meant to say was, Yaesu was the only radio I know of. Actually I probably do know of others, but I have lost those brain cells.
        >
        >The problem is that if the radio is only sending 1 stop bit and the computer is expecting to see 2, the computer will drop data, probably after the first data byte. When you have slower data speeds and there is a lot of streaming data (e.g. you are spinning the tuning knob and the radio is sending frequency data) being sent, there are no gaps between the data. The radio will send start bit, 8 bits of data, stop bit, start bit, 8 bits of data, stop bit, etc. The computer will be looking for a second stop bit which will be the start bit of the next byte. But after that, the byte will be corrupt. It may or may not sync back up after the second byte. You can therefore see that you can lose a lot of your data in this situation. What is characteristic of this problem, is that transmission from the computer to the radio is fine, because an extra stop bit is no problem for the radio. It just makes the overall throughput 10% slower. So, usually the user complains about the fact that he or she can send commands to the radio just fine, but the computer sometimes can't tell when the radio changes frequency.
      • Vilnis YL2KF
        Hello from Icom user The serial data format is 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit , baud rate up to You. One of best place on web as follows :
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 2, 2006
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          Hello from Icom user

          The serial data format is 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit , baud rate up
          to You.
          One of best place on web as follows :
          http://www.plicht.de/ekki/civ/civtoc.html

          73
          YL2KF Vilnis

          >
          >
        • AD5VJ Bob
          The TS-2000 does also in the manual. In fact that was the model I had set up before I traded it off for my IC-775, So I had to change the address and the stop
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 2, 2006
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            The TS-2000 does also in the manual. In fact that was the model I had set up before I traded it off for my IC-775, So I had to
            change the address and the stop bits as well.

            Icom does seem to always be 8,1,none however.

            I also just read on another reflector where there is a new version of some software for the CI-V which it is said allows operation
            of more than one rig from the serial port *FINALLY*.

            Here is the post as I copied it from the Icom Reflector just now:
            ----------
            >>Hi all,

            >>there is a new version of the Icom CI-V driver
            >>available for Radio Control which has the following new features:

            >>* Operation of multiple radios over one serial port
            >>* Forwarding of frequency and
            >>mode changes at the radio to Radio Control
            >>* Access to special radio memory banks/channels
            >>* Adjustment of radio settling time in device configuration
            >>* Use of radio-internal scanner for Radio Control scan operations
            >>* Rephrased error messages

            >>The driver has special support for 9 receivers
            >>(e.g. IC-R8500, IC-R75)
            >>and 19 transceivers (e.g. IC-706, 746 and 756 family).

            >>However, every other radio that has a CI-V jack
            >>can be accessed too, by using the universal driver.

            >>An updated and free Trial Edition
            >>and more information is
            >>available at www.radioctl.com

            >>Regards
            >>Ralf
            ----------

            73 fer nw,
            Bob AD5VJ(AAR6VM)
            http://www.ad5vj.com/

            Member CTDXCC
            10X# 37210, FP#-1141
            SMIRK#-5177, RARS #-149


            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: N1MMLogger@yahoogroups.com
            > [mailto:N1MMLogger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert Chudek - K0RC
            > Sent: Sunday, July 02, 2006 11:35 AM
            > To: N1MMLogger@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [N1MM] Re: Ic-706MKIIG
            >
            > Careful Ed, please don't propagate the idea that Yaesu is the
            > "only" radio that requires 2 stop bits. The Kenwood TS-950
            > series requires 4800, 8, N, 2 parameters for proper
            > operation. I'm 99% confident the TS-450 and TS-690 also run
            > with these parameters. (I don't have those manuals in the
            > shack to verify this.)
            >
            > 73 de Bob - K0RC
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
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