Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [MysticCrossing] Help: Document scanning specialists

Expand Messages
  • Jon Niehof
    ... I used to work for a document management company. On-site work was not the sort of thing that one would pay for out of one s own pocket as a hobby. ...
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 17, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      > I'm interested in scanning local libraries' historical maps of
      > Medford and surrounding areas. Does anyone have experience
      > with or heard about any really good document scanning services
      > willing to do on-site work at a reasonable price? If not I'll
      > just hit the yellow pages, but that feels kinda like a crap
      > shoot.

      I used to work for a document management company. On-site work
      was not the sort of thing that one would pay for out of one's
      own pocket as a hobby.

      > Or, what the heck -- does anyone have the right equipment I
      > could borrow? ( I'm guessing a really big scanner or a
      hi-res
      > digital camera on a precision mount ).

      Digital camera probably wouldn't be good enough. There has been
      some discussion among the Project Gutenberg Distributed
      Proofreaders and consensus is that, at this point, the results
      from the best cameras get barely OCR-able text. I can't imagine
      a map would be accurately reproduced.

      You're probably looking for an "orbital scanner" or "planetary
      scanner," where the picture-taking equipment is above the
      material on a rigid mount. It's similar in principle to the
      digicam idea but much less chewing-gum-and-baling-wire.
      Sheet-feed large format scanners probably aren't appropriate for
      historical maps.



      __________________________________
      Do you Yahoo!?
      Yahoo! Mail - 250MB free storage. Do more. Manage less.
      http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250
    • Robert Mela
      Ugh. Orbital -- Minolta PS7000 and BookEye -- both run about $15k and can only handle about 17 x23 Wide-format sheet-feed scanners are similarly pricey. I m
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 17, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Ugh. Orbital -- Minolta PS7000 and BookEye -- both run about $15k and
        can only handle about 17"x23"

        Wide-format sheet-feed scanners are similarly pricey.

        I'm starting to think hack -- a flatbed scanner & something like enblend
        ( http://enblend.sourceforge.net/ )

        Jon Niehof wrote:

        >I used to work for a document management company. On-site work
        >was not the sort of thing that one would pay for out of one's
        >own pocket as a hobby.
        >
        >
        >Digital camera probably wouldn't be good enough. There has been
        >some discussion among the Project Gutenberg Distributed
        >Proofreaders and consensus is that, at this point, the results
        >from the best cameras get barely OCR-able text. I can't imagine
        >a map would be accurately reproduced.
        >
        >You're probably looking for an "orbital scanner" or "planetary
        >scanner," where the picture-taking equipment is above the
        >material on a rigid mount. It's similar in principle to the
        >digicam idea but much less chewing-gum-and-baling-wire.
        >Sheet-feed large format scanners probably aren't appropriate for
        >historical maps.
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.