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Tribute to the Titanic - 100 th. Year - Wonderful Music

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  • Carol S
    Thank you for the Great Presentation of the loss of this Great Ship. Your show was put together like a movie. Enjoyed all the music and stories. Sometimes
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 15, 2012
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      Thank you for the Great Presentation of the loss of this Great Ship. Your show was put together like a movie. Enjoyed all the music and stories. Sometimes it's hard to beleive that it actually took place.
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      Bandleader Wallace Hartley, 33, and his musicians played lively ragtime tunes while the lifeboats were lowered and continued until the ship went under. None attempted to get into a lifeboat and none survived.


      Among the passengers was Isidor Straus, the owner of Macy's, the world's largest department store, and his wife Ida. When women were being loaded onto the lifeboats, she hesitated and then stepped back.

      "We have been living together for many years," she said to her husband. "Where you go, I go." Calmly, the two of them sat down in deck chairs and waited. A huge wave washed them into the ocean. Isidor's body was later recovered and shipped to New York. Ida's body was never recovered.

      John Jacob Astor, IV, 47, the recently divorced and extremely wealthy businessman and real estate investor, was returning from his honeymoon with his 18-year-old pregnant new wife, Madeleine.

      Astor assisted his young wife into a lifeboat and then asked if he could join her. His request was denied as he watched the boat drop away two-thirds full. He went off to await his fate. His body was recovered later, identified by the embroidered initials in his shirt.

      Benjamin Guggenheim, member of a prominent mining family, was accompanied by his mistress, his valet, chauffeur, a maid, and others. He slept through the collision with the iceberg but was awakened by his valet. Fitted with a lifebelt and heavy sweater, he was sent with the ladies to the boat deck.

      After the women boarded he returned to his cabin where he changed into formal evening wear. He declared that if he was going to perish he wanted to do so like a gentleman. He and his valet were last seen on the grand staircase sipping brandy and smoking cigars. Their bodies were never recovered.

      Two Roman Catholic priests were on board and held Mass for second and third class passengers during the voyage. Father Thomas Byles, 42, helped third-class passengers up stairs and into the boats, heard confessions, and prayed with those unable to escape.

      John George "Jack" Phillips, 25, was the chief wireless operator and remained at his post flashing signals calling for assistance until the ship went under.

      Similarly, Chief Engineer William Bell and a few crewmen kept the steam up in the boiler rooms so that the ship lights would remain lit and there would be power to keep the pumps going until the very end.

      There's uncertainty and controversy over Captain Edward Smith's actions during this disaster. Did he fail to heed warnings of icebergs? Was he too interested in increasing speed? Should he have been better prepared for the emergency? Continued...



      Many accounts report that he made his way to the wireless room and told the operators they had done their duty and it was now every man for himself. He was last seen on the bridge and went down with his ship.

      The youngest passenger on board was 2-month-old Millvina Dean who, with her parents and older brother, was emigrating from England to Kansas. She was placed with her mother and brother in a lifeboat. Her father perished and was never found. She died in 2009, age 97, the last survivor of the Titanic disaster.

      Frederick Fleet was the lookout who alerted First Officer William Murdoch that there was an iceberg. Murdoch ordered the ship's engines into reverse but it was too late. Fleet was ordered to help with the lifeboats and survived the sinking.

      In World War I he served in the merchant marine and after on the Titanic's sister ship "Olympic." He suffered from guilt his entire life because he lived while so many perished. His wife died after Christmas 1964 and two weeks later he committed suicide by hanging himself. He is often referred to as the last victim of the Titanic.

      Clinton artist Marek Sarba has memorialized those individuals who perished in the Titanic disaster with illustrations of 57 individuals descending the Grand Staircase.

      Sarba was born in Warsaw and went to work in the Polish seaport of Gdansk where he worked for 24 years as an electrical engineer in the shipyards. He and his wife Barbara came to the U.S. more than 30 years ago. While working in a shipyard in Florida he saw an exhibit of the artifacts recovered by Robert Ballard's historic discovery of the Titanic.

      Now recognized as an accomplished maritime artist with his soattempted to get into a lifeboat and none survived.

      Among the passengers was Isidor Straus, the owner of Macy's, the world's largest department store, and his wife Ida. When women were being loaded onto the lifeboats, she hesitated and then stepped back.

      "We have been living together for many years," she said to her husband. "Where you go, I go." Calmly, the two of them sat down in deck chairs and waited. A huge wave washed them into the ocean. Isidor's body was later recovered and shipped to New York. Ida's body was never recovered.

      John Jacob Astor, IV, 47, the recently divorced and extremely wealthy businessman and real estate investor, was returning from his honeymoon with his 18-year-old pregnant new wife, Madeleine.

      Astor assisted his young wife into a lifeboat and then asked if he could join her. His request was denied as he watched the boat drop away two-thirds full. He went off to await his fate. His body was recovered later, identified by the embroidered initials in his shirt.

      Benjamin Guggenheim, member of a prominent mining family, was accompanied by his mistress, his valet, chauffeur, a maid, and others. He slept through the collision with the iceberg but was awakened by his valet. Fitted with a lifebelt and heavy sweater, he was sent with the ladies to the boat deck.

      After the women boarded he returned to his cabin where he changed into formal evening wear. He declared that if he was going to perish he wanted to do so like a gentleman. He and his valet were last seen on the grand staircase sipping brandy and smoking cigars. Their bodies were never recovered.

      Two Roman Catholic priests were on board and held Mass for second and third class passengers during the voyage. Father Thomas Byles, 42, helped third-class passengers up stairs and into the boats, heard confessions, and prayed with those unable to escape.

      John George "Jack" Phillips, 25, was the chief wireless operator and remained at his post flashing signals calling for assistance until the ship went under.

      Similarly, Chief Engineer William Bell and a few crewmen kept the steam up in the boiler rooms so that the ship lights would remain lit and there would be power to keep the pumps going until the very end.

      There's uncertainty and controversy over Captain Edward Smith's actions during this disaster. Did he fail to heed warnings of icebergs? Was he too interested in increasing speed? Should he have been better prepared for the emergency?

      Many accounts report that he made his way to the wireless room and told the operators they had done their duty and it was now every man for himself. He was last seen on the bridge and went down with his ship.

      The youngest passenger on board was 2-month-old Millvina Dean who, with her parents and older brother, was emigrating from England to Kansas. She was placed with her mother and brother in a lifeboat. Her father perished and was never found. She died in 2009, age 97, the last survivor of the Titanic disaster.

      Frederick Fleet was the lookout who alerted First Officer William Murdoch that there was an iceberg. Murdoch ordered the ship's engines into reverse but it was too late. Fleet was ordered to help with the lifeboats and survived the sinking.

      In World War I he served in the merchant marine and after on the Titanic's sister ship "Olympic." He suffered from guilt his entire life because he lived while so many perished. His wife died after Christmas 1964 and two weeks later he committed suicide by hanging himself. He is often referred to as the last victim of the Titanic.

      Clinton artist Marek Sarba has memorialized those individuals who perished in the Titanic disaster with illustrations of 57 individuals descending the Grand Staircase.

      Sarba was born in Warsaw and went to work in the Polish seaport of Gdansk where he worked for 24 years as an electrical engineer in the shipyards. He and his wife Barbara came to the U.S. more than 30 years ago. While working in a shipyard in Florida he saw an exhibit of the artifacts recovered by Robert Ballard's historic discovery of the Titanic.

      Now recognized as an accomplished maritime artist with his sought-after work displayed at Mystic Seaport's Maritime Gallery, Mariner's Museum in Newport News, the Merchant Marine Museum in Kings Point and elsewhere, Sarba says the Titanic discovery "ignited me."

      "I worked for bread but once in a while have a piece of cake," he said referring to his interest in the Titanic and his love of painting.

      He began by meticulously examining photographs and 1912 newspaper images to draw portraits and then added their bodies. All individuals are actual depictions except for the little boy who represents the third class passengers.
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