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The Music of the Stars on stage:

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  • LouRugani
    Love. Hope. Connections. A 1940 s journey of live radio connecting a nation. The year - 1940 - and the newly created Canadian Broadcasting Corporation airs
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 17, 2009
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      Love. Hope. Connections.

      A 1940's journey of live radio connecting a nation.

      The year - 1940 - and the newly created Canadian Broadcasting Corporation airs its first live radio broadcast from the Normandy Roof in the Mount Royal Hotel, Montreal. "Music of the Stars", a weekly national radio variety show, launches to keep Canadian listeners informed and distract them from the suffering of the war.

      Complete with lively period songs, dance, ad jingles and live sound effects, contrasted with news broadcasts, live interviews and reports from the front, this is a re-creation of a typical WWII CBC radio show; an entertaining, uplifting and honest portrayal of an era of live broadcast in radio ...

      In Act I (1940), Gerald (Gerry), the station manager and a WWI vet comes on stage, joined by Ron Houseman, the MC and Maxine Martin, the show's cue girl – both who suffer from extreme stage fright. Ron introduces Alice Thompson, a singing star from Calgary whose brother had just gone to join the war, followed by May Powell, a well-known society newspaper columnist. Finally, Dixie Coleman, joins the radio cast as the music director and accompanist to the singers. The performers all start out as somewhat apprehensive as it is the first live recording and are not familiar with each other. During this first show, Gordon Watkins, a naïve, young, soldier who has just arrived in England from Dunkirk is interviewed by May Powell.

      In Act II (1942), the show has been running for more than two years and is now broadcast twice a week. The regulars are more comfortable and the ambiance is more relaxed. Cue girl, Maxine, has even graduated to singing solos on the program. The major event in the news is Dieppe and newly appointed Captain/Lieutenant Gordon Watkins provides a first-hand account from the BBC studio in England of the attack and the impact on the Canadian troops. We also learn that Alice's brother is among those named on the list of those missing in action in France, and we see how the Alice is supported by her fellow cast-mates. The show's feature `Soldiers Speak' continues, where letters to and from Canadian servicemen abroad are read aloud, this time providing a glimpse of war-time from a lonesome soldier to his wife, Norah.

      In Act III (1944), "Music of the Stars" is in its 5th year and celebrating its 500th broadcast. The show's regulars have become old pros and the show is so popular that it broadcasts nightly. Things are looking up and it looks like war is coming to an end and it is time to celebrate. However, the war continues to take its toll and another visit from Lieutenant-Colonel Gordon Watkins, this time in person, reveals his traumatic wartime experiences and how he became wounded on the beaches of Normandy during D-Day. As Maxine reads the hourly lists of war dead as well as those newly conscripted for service, we learn something about the characters that surprises everyone. The group is left to console their audience and each other as the show goes on:

      "Smile the while you kiss me sad adieu
      When the clouds roll by I'll come to you…
      So wait and pray each night for me
      `Till we meet again."

      Till We Meet Again is a story of Love, Hope and Connections. Through their shared experiences, camaraderie, compassion and supportive relationships develop among the characters. Heartfelt emotions are conveyed through letters to and from Canadian servicemen, and as Lieutenant Watkins recounts his support and love for his troops. With the uplifting celebration of the 500th broadcast, times are looking up and there is hope for the future. Till We Meet Again reminds audiences of their connection; to history, to Canada, to the experiences and stories that make this era so unique, and to the generations before and after them. This re-creation of a typical CBC radio show from the WWII era is a time capsule that allows audiences to experience the era, lost in radio land...

      Theatre Panache is proud to restage Till We Meet Again in Fall 2009 with a 36-performance tour beginning and ending in Montreal, with shows in Ottawa, Mississauga, Markham and Oakville. This will be the largest tour to date for this professional production.
    • Blue
      Nice.
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 20, 2009
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        Nice.

        --- In MusicOfTheStars@yahoogroups.com, "LouRugani" <x779@...> wrote:
        >
        > Love. Hope. Connections.
        >
        > A 1940's journey of live radio connecting a nation.
        >
        > The year - 1940 - and the newly created Canadian Broadcasting Corporation airs its first live radio broadcast from the Normandy Roof in the Mount Royal Hotel, Montreal. "Music of the Stars", a weekly national radio variety show, launches to keep Canadian listeners informed and distract them from the suffering of the war.
        >
        > Complete with lively period songs, dance, ad jingles and live sound effects, contrasted with news broadcasts, live interviews and reports from the front, this is a re-creation of a typical WWII CBC radio show; an entertaining, uplifting and honest portrayal of an era of live broadcast in radio ...
        >
        > In Act I (1940), Gerald (Gerry), the station manager and a WWI vet comes on stage, joined by Ron Houseman, the MC and Maxine Martin, the show's cue girl – both who suffer from extreme stage fright. Ron introduces Alice Thompson, a singing star from Calgary whose brother had just gone to join the war, followed by May Powell, a well-known society newspaper columnist. Finally, Dixie Coleman, joins the radio cast as the music director and accompanist to the singers. The performers all start out as somewhat apprehensive as it is the first live recording and are not familiar with each other. During this first show, Gordon Watkins, a naïve, young, soldier who has just arrived in England from Dunkirk is interviewed by May Powell.
        >
        > In Act II (1942), the show has been running for more than two years and is now broadcast twice a week. The regulars are more comfortable and the ambiance is more relaxed. Cue girl, Maxine, has even graduated to singing solos on the program. The major event in the news is Dieppe and newly appointed Captain/Lieutenant Gordon Watkins provides a first-hand account from the BBC studio in England of the attack and the impact on the Canadian troops. We also learn that Alice's brother is among those named on the list of those missing in action in France, and we see how the Alice is supported by her fellow cast-mates. The show's feature `Soldiers Speak' continues, where letters to and from Canadian servicemen abroad are read aloud, this time providing a glimpse of war-time from a lonesome soldier to his wife, Norah.
        >
        > In Act III (1944), "Music of the Stars" is in its 5th year and celebrating its 500th broadcast. The show's regulars have become old pros and the show is so popular that it broadcasts nightly. Things are looking up and it looks like war is coming to an end and it is time to celebrate. However, the war continues to take its toll and another visit from Lieutenant-Colonel Gordon Watkins, this time in person, reveals his traumatic wartime experiences and how he became wounded on the beaches of Normandy during D-Day. As Maxine reads the hourly lists of war dead as well as those newly conscripted for service, we learn something about the characters that surprises everyone. The group is left to console their audience and each other as the show goes on:
        >
        > "Smile the while you kiss me sad adieu
        > When the clouds roll by I'll come to you…
        > So wait and pray each night for me
        > `Till we meet again."
        >
        > Till We Meet Again is a story of Love, Hope and Connections. Through their shared experiences, camaraderie, compassion and supportive relationships develop among the characters. Heartfelt emotions are conveyed through letters to and from Canadian servicemen, and as Lieutenant Watkins recounts his support and love for his troops. With the uplifting celebration of the 500th broadcast, times are looking up and there is hope for the future. Till We Meet Again reminds audiences of their connection; to history, to Canada, to the experiences and stories that make this era so unique, and to the generations before and after them. This re-creation of a typical CBC radio show from the WWII era is a time capsule that allows audiences to experience the era, lost in radio land...
        >
        > Theatre Panache is proud to restage Till We Meet Again in Fall 2009 with a 36-performance tour beginning and ending in Montreal, with shows in Ottawa, Mississauga, Markham and Oakville. This will be the largest tour to date for this professional production.
        >
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