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Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

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  • Ron Pastorino
    Anybody like to comment on these little guys I found yesterday in a logged out area? http://mushroomobserver.org/68582 Ron
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 2, 2011
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      Anybody like to comment on these little guys I found yesterday in a logged out
      area?
      http://mushroomobserver.org/68582

      Ron
    • Dimitar Bojantchev
      Nice. Ron these remind me strongly of Pholiota highlandensis... Do I see burned wood around them? The smooth spores are very close.
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 2, 2011
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        Nice. Ron these remind me strongly of Pholiota highlandensis... Do I see burned wood around them? The smooth spores are very close.
         
         
        Where did you go? What elev.? How is the diversity? What do you recommend for a place to go hunting next? Diversity-wise, couldn't care less about morels at this point.  
         
        We did a short foray last weekend near Georgetown and again not much to report on, but just a few things. One rare Cort that Debbie Viess found earlier...  
         
           D.
         
         

        Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2011 9:20 PM
        Subject: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

         

        Anybody like to comment on these little guys I found yesterday in a logged out
        area?
        http://mushroomobserver.org/68582

        Ron

      • Ron Pastorino
        Thanks Dimi, that does look like a good guess. I did find some scattered Ch-cystidia and added a couple of photos. There were plenty of burned areas of slash
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 2, 2011
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          Thanks Dimi, that does look like a good guess.  I  did find some scattered Ch-cystidia and added a couple of photos.
          There were plenty of burned areas of slash piles and I believe these were very near or on one.
           I was looking for variety also but the picking was sparse in that regard. These were near Jenkinson Lake just off of the Mormon Immigrant Trail ~ 4000ft.  The ground was  very wet but probably  still too cold for widespread fruitings although a few scattered Boletus rex-veris can be found. I suspect that the season is being stretched out and that in the next week or three one could find more variety in many areas in the 4-5000ft elevations.
             Ron



          From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
          To: Mushroom Talk <MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thu, June 2, 2011 9:46:01 PM
          Subject: Re: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

           

          Nice. Ron these remind me strongly of Pholiota highlandensis... Do I see burned wood around them? The smooth spores are very close.
           
           
          Where did you go? What elev.? How is the diversity? What do you recommend for a place to go hunting next? Diversity-wise, couldn't care less about morels at this point.  
           
          We did a short foray last weekend near Georgetown and again not much to report on, but just a few things. One rare Cort that Debbie Viess found earlier...  
           
             D.
           
           

          Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2011 9:20 PM
          Subject: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

           

          Anybody like to comment on these little guys I found yesterday in a logged out
          area?
          http://mushroomobserver.org/68582

          Ron

        • Dimitar Bojantchev
          This has been the weirdest spring during my 21 years in California. Cold rain and more cold rain, it felt like December almost every day since January.
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 2, 2011
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            This has been the weirdest spring during my 21 years in California. Cold rain and more cold rain, it felt like December almost every day since January. Possibly, only 1995 was similar in vernal precipitation as we skied well until June-July.

            It is interesting to see spring kings near morels and recent snow appearing together – the boletes generally like warmer weather, but since they were almost completely gone last year, I am less surprised that they are ready to fruit this year regardless of the conditions. Which brings me back to my old hypothesis that abundant bolete fruitings are rather bi-annual events.  By that hypothesis this fall will be an excellent king bolete season.  The prediction for last season was right on the money, despite being made early in the season.

            The good part is that despite the relative scarcity of standard mushrooms during these weird weather patterns, the weird stuff has a field day. I already saw 3 species that I had never seen before and this is quite exciting.

                            D.

            P.S. Ah, Ron, your cystidia shots on MO are not it, my friend. A good cystidia shot should show many of them with a distinct shape. This could be a sticking-out hyphal end. A cystidia to be it, by default, has to show shape that is significantly different than any of the basidioles. I am only saying this because I know you like improving your skills.

             


            Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2011 10:15 PM
            Subject: Re: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

             

            Thanks Dimi, that does look like a good guess.  I  did find some scattered Ch-cystidia and added a couple of photos.
            There were plenty of burned areas of slash piles and I believe these were very near or on one.
             I was looking for variety also but the picking was sparse in that regard. These were near Jenkinson Lake just off of the Mormon Immigrant Trail ~ 4000ft.  The ground was  very wet but probably  still too cold for widespread fruitings although a few scattered Boletus rex-veris can be found. I suspect that the season is being stretched out and that in the next week or three one could find more variety in many areas in the 4-5000ft elevations.
               Ron



            From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
            To: Mushroom Talk <MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thu, June 2, 2011 9:46:01 PM
            Subject: Re: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

             

            Nice. Ron these remind me strongly of Pholiota highlandensis... Do I see burned wood around them? The smooth spores are very close.
             
             
            Where did you go? What elev.? How is the diversity? What do you recommend for a place to go hunting next? Diversity-wise, couldn't care less about morels at this point.  
             
            We did a short foray last weekend near Georgetown and again not much to report on, but just a few things. One rare Cort that Debbie Viess found earlier...  
             
               D.
             
             

            Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2011 9:20 PM
            Subject: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

             

            Anybody like to comment on these little guys I found yesterday in a logged out
            area?
            http://mushroomobserver.org/68582

            Ron

          • Ron Pastorino
            Thanks Dimi and no problem. Don t mind corrections and I should have signed up for Dr. D s Spring Class in the Sierras , assuming they don t have to snowplow
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 3, 2011
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               Thanks Dimi and no problem.  Don't mind corrections and I should have signed up for Dr. D's Spring Class in the Sierras , assuming they don't have to snowplow their way into the Camp.
               I was a little leery of those "cystidia" shots but they were rather interesting from a photographic perspective.  I initially didn't consider Pholiota because of the reddish brown spores and gill color development.  I should know by now not to put too much emphasis on spore color as I believe a number of mycologists seldom take the time to get a mass spore print or are working from dried material and tend to estimate spore color from under the microscope.
                 R



              From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
              To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thu, June 2, 2011 11:52:36 PM
              Subject: Re: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

               

              This has been the weirdest spring during my 21 years in California. Cold rain and more cold rain, it felt like December almost every day since January. Possibly, only 1995 was similar in vernal precipitation as we skied well until June-July.

              It is interesting to see spring kings near morels and recent snow appearing together – the boletes generally like warmer weather, but since they were almost completely gone last year, I am less surprised that they are ready to fruit this year regardless of the conditions. Which brings me back to my old hypothesis that abundant bolete fruitings are rather bi-annual events.  By that hypothesis this fall will be an excellent king bolete season.  The prediction for last season was right on the money, despite being made early in the season.

              The good part is that despite the relative scarcity of standard mushrooms during these weird weather patterns, the weird stuff has a field day. I already saw 3 species that I had never seen before and this is quite exciting.

                              D.

              P.S. Ah, Ron, your cystidia shots on MO are not it, my friend. A good cystidia shot should show many of them with a distinct shape. This could be a sticking-out hyphal end. A cystidia to be it, by default, has to show shape that is significantly different than any of the basidioles. I am only saying this because I know you like improving your skills.

               


              Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2011 10:15 PM
              Subject: Re: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

               

              Thanks Dimi, that does look like a good guess.  I  did find some scattered Ch-cystidia and added a couple of photos.
              There were plenty of burned areas of slash piles and I believe these were very near or on one.
               I was looking for variety also but the picking was sparse in that regard. These were near Jenkinson Lake just off of the Mormon Immigrant Trail ~ 4000ft.  The ground was  very wet but probably  still too cold for widespread fruitings although a few scattered Boletus rex-veris can be found. I suspect that the season is being stretched out and that in the next week or three one could find more variety in many areas in the 4-5000ft elevations.
                 Ron



              From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
              To: Mushroom Talk <MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thu, June 2, 2011 9:46:01 PM
              Subject: Re: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

               

              Nice. Ron these remind me strongly of Pholiota highlandensis... Do I see burned wood around them? The smooth spores are very close.
               
               
              Where did you go? What elev.? How is the diversity? What do you recommend for a place to go hunting next? Diversity-wise, couldn't care less about morels at this point.  
               
              We did a short foray last weekend near Georgetown and again not much to report on, but just a few things. One rare Cort that Debbie Viess found earlier...  
               
                 D.
               
               

              Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2011 9:20 PM
              Subject: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

               

              Anybody like to comment on these little guys I found yesterday in a logged out
              area?
              http://mushroomobserver.org/68582

              Ron

            • Dimitar Bojantchev
              Hi Ron, I can offer a no fanfare 20 min practical exercise to aspiring amateur mycologists that will make one find cystidia without too much effort. Ping me
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 3, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Ron,
                 
                I can offer a 'no fanfare' 20 min practical exercise to aspiring amateur mycologists that will make one find cystidia without too much effort. Ping me anytime you're in the area. Plus,  my view is that if cystidia is really present then it should be easy to see (in 98% of the cases). On the Pholiota highlandensis, I think Mykoweb has a shot of the cystidia that I made back when I was just starting. Good observations on MO and your contribution in particular have shown that they are of great value -- therefore as we start digging deeper into the Russula, there it is a must to do decent spores and pileipellis analysis.
                 
                It is always of value to get a good spore drop for color. With the brown spored genera you can see how they vary -- the thickness of the spore wall is of major importance, IMO. Within the corts it can vary to light brownish, almost Tubaria-like (for the thinner spores species) to dark rusty brown for the thicker walled material). With experience one can start to learn to approximate these colors just by looking into the microscope. But it is never realiable, plys of not too much value. It is only interesting in some groups where there is a striking deviation in the expected color -- like the green spores shaggy parasols, for example...
                 
                        D.
                 

                Sent: Friday, June 03, 2011 8:21 AM
                Subject: Re: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

                 

                 Thanks Dimi and no problem.  Don't mind corrections and I should have signed up for Dr. D's Spring Class in the Sierras , assuming they don't have to snowplow their way into the Camp.
                 I was a little leery of those "cystidia" shots but they were rather interesting from a photographic perspective.  I initially didn't consider Pholiota because of the reddish brown spores and gill color development.  I should know by now not to put too much emphasis on spore color as I believe a number of mycologists seldom take the time to get a mass spore print or are working from dried material and tend to estimate spore color from under the microscope.
                   R



                From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
                To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thu, June 2, 2011 11:52:36 PM
                Subject: Re: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

                 

                This has been the weirdest spring during my 21 years in California. Cold rain and more cold rain, it felt like December almost every day since January. Possibly, only 1995 was similar in vernal precipitation as we skied well until June-July.

                It is interesting to see spring kings near morels and recent snow appearing together – the boletes generally like warmer weather, but since they were almost completely gone last year, I am less surprised that they are ready to fruit this year regardless of the conditions. Which brings me back to my old hypothesis that abundant bolete fruitings are rather bi-annual events.  By that hypothesis this fall will be an excellent king bolete season.  The prediction for last season was right on the money, despite being made early in the season.

                The good part is that despite the relative scarcity of standard mushrooms during these weird weather patterns, the weird stuff has a field day. I already saw 3 species that I had never seen before and this is quite exciting.

                                D.

                P.S. Ah, Ron, your cystidia shots on MO are not it, my friend. A good cystidia shot should show many of them with a distinct shape. This could be a sticking-out hyphal end. A cystidia to be it, by default, has to show shape that is significantly different than any of the basidioles. I am only saying this because I know you like improving your skills.

                 


                Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2011 10:15 PM
                Subject: Re: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

                 

                Thanks Dimi, that does look like a good guess.  I  did find some scattered Ch-cystidia and added a couple of photos.
                There were plenty of burned areas of slash piles and I believe these were very near or on one.
                 I was looking for variety also but the picking was sparse in that regard. These were near Jenkinson Lake just off of the Mormon Immigrant Trail ~ 4000ft.  The ground was  very wet but probably  still too cold for widespread fruitings although a few scattered Boletus rex-veris can be found. I suspect that the season is being stretched out and that in the next week or three one could find more variety in many areas in the 4-5000ft elevations.
                   Ron



                From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
                To: Mushroom Talk <MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thu, June 2, 2011 9:46:01 PM
                Subject: Re: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

                 

                Nice. Ron these remind me strongly of Pholiota highlandensis... Do I see burned wood around them? The smooth spores are very close.
                 
                 
                Where did you go? What elev.? How is the diversity? What do you recommend for a place to go hunting next? Diversity-wise, couldn't care less about morels at this point.  
                 
                We did a short foray last weekend near Georgetown and again not much to report on, but just a few things. One rare Cort that Debbie Viess found earlier...  
                 
                   D.
                 
                 

                Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2011 9:20 PM
                Subject: [MT] Unknown Sierran Cortinariaceae

                 

                Anybody like to comment on these little guys I found yesterday in a logged out
                area?
                http://mushroomobserver.org/68582

                Ron

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