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Vermont - online resources?

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  • Ruth Stiles
    I m headed to Vermont next week, does anyone have suggestions for online resources for identifying the mushrooms I find? I m looking for websites, not books.
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 1, 2010
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      I'm headed to Vermont next week, does anyone have suggestions for online resources for identifying the mushrooms I find? I'm looking for websites, not books.

      This is mostly a family visit, so I won't have time for detailed study. I'm just looking for something that will help me keep from getting in trouble with an mushroom that looks like a California edible, but turns out to be something else entirely. I don't want to tour any Vermont medical facilities.

      Thanks,
      Ruth
    • debbieviess
      Photo ID is always an iffy proposition, even more so in unknown hunting territory... Avoid the edible bicolored boletes, too many toxic lookalikes. Be wary of
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 1, 2010
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        Photo ID is always an iffy proposition, even more so in unknown hunting territory...

        Avoid the edible bicolored boletes, too many toxic lookalikes. Be wary of Boletus huronensis, which can also mimc edulis (kinda) and is seriously toxic. This bolete is very heavy in the hand, and stains blue slowy.

        If hunting edibles in the East, your best bets are the foolproof fungi:
        Shaggy manes, Hericiums (out now), sulphur shelves (unmistakeable; Laetiporus cinncinatus, the one with the pale not sulphur yellow pore surface, is the best eating). Black chanterelles/Craterellus. Golden chanterelles (MUCH smaller and more delicate than our western versions), and Cantharellus cinnabarinus (red-orange and peppery tasting)....beware the similar jack-o-lanterns, which have true deep gills and orange not white context. Also, they have both hedgehogs out there, bellybutton and repandum, also unmistakeable. Oh yeah, and the maitake, Grifola frondosa, in huge rosettes at the bases of trees. This is the best darned polypore that you will ever eat! Also unmistakeable.

        If you have a copy of Lincoff's Audubon Guide to Mushrooms of North America, I would bring it along. It is very useful for the east, and not quite so weighty as MDM. I don't leave home for the east without it!

        Fergeddabout the boletes and just stick to these groups and you should be fine.

        You can always post photos to MO for ID as well, lotsa eastern folks on that list.

        Good luck and have fun!

        Debbie Viess

        --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, Ruth Stiles <ruths@...> wrote:
        >
        > I'm headed to Vermont next week, does anyone have suggestions for
        > online resources for identifying the mushrooms I find? I'm looking for
        > websites, not books.
        >
        > This is mostly a family visit, so I won't have time for detailed study.
        > I'm just looking for something that will help me keep from getting in
        > trouble with an mushroom that /looks /like a California edible, but
        > turns out to be something else entirely. I don't want to tour any
        > Vermont medical facilities.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Ruth
        >
      • fast_jybe
        Hi Ruth, first of all we here on MushroomTalk are a pretty good online resource for identification, including for edibles on Eastern mushrooms. We may not
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 1, 2010
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          Hi Ruth,

          first of all we here on MushroomTalk are a pretty good online resource for identification, including for edibles on Eastern mushrooms. We may not always be as close to the exact taxonomy on Eastern as we're for the Western material, but we're not far behind anyone, so as far as edibles, you can show your stuff here. We have some good Eastern folks too.

          But as far the best online resource for mushrooms East of Mississippi in my opinion – the MushroomExpert.com has done extremely good job in coverage and good textual descriptions. There are other forums too, of course: the MushroomObserver is a very competent one that deals with both edible and esoteric stuff!. Then there are the Pennsylvania Clubs, there is a North-Eastern group on Yahoo, etc. There are probably 50-100 people in all USA who one would call local experts, so we pretty much know each other and cross paths in most forums (and sometimes in the fields). Lately people are posting mushroom photos on Facebook too.

          As far as books – there are several books on Amazon, which cover the North East area quite well. In general there is a pretty good set of fields guides covering the Eastern seaboard – I will put a list when I get home and look at them.

          I have an airline ticket for Boston Oct 13-19, but may have to cancel because I have some very urgent business stuff to attend to. Weill see.

          But bottom line – sow us photos – that's what we do… And photos are a darn good method for id, not perfect, but the best we've got..

          D.




          --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, Ruth Stiles <ruths@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm headed to Vermont next week, does anyone have suggestions for
          > online resources for identifying the mushrooms I find? I'm looking for
          > websites, not books.
          >
          > This is mostly a family visit, so I won't have time for detailed study.
          > I'm just looking for something that will help me keep from getting in
          > trouble with an mushroom that /looks /like a California edible, but
          > turns out to be something else entirely. I don't want to tour any
          > Vermont medical facilities.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Ruth
          >
        • Herman Brown
          Hi Ruth, Try Michael Kuo s site, http://www.mushroomexpert.com/major_groups.html. Or do a search in www.google.com for vermont mushroom key Herman Brown ...
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 1, 2010
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            Hi Ruth,
            Or do a search in www.google.com for "vermont mushroom key"
            Herman Brown
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Friday, October 01, 2010 12:12 AM
            Subject: [MT] Vermont - online resources?

            I'm headed to Vermont next week, does anyone have suggestions for online resources for identifying the mushrooms I find? I'm looking for websites, not books.

            This is mostly a family visit, so I won't have time for detailed study. I'm just looking for something that will help me keep from getting in trouble with an mushroom that looks like a California edible, but turns out to be something else entirely. I don't want to tour any Vermont medical facilities.

            Thanks,
            Ruth
          • debbieviess
            Hi Ruth, Since your focus is on eastern edibles, and there are finite numbers of those (as well as infinite numbers of other sorts of mushrooms to compare,
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 2, 2010
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              Hi Ruth,
              Since your focus is on eastern edibles, and there are finite numbers of those (as well as infinite numbers of other sorts of mushrooms to compare, contrast, and confuse) I would start by printing and taking along this quick course on what NOT to eat, published by NEMF:

              http://www.nemf.org/files/lincoff/beginners/poison.html

              David Fischer also has an excellant book on edibles, "Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America", focused on food shrooms and their toxic or unpalatable lookalikes of the east coast. This one would get you most of the good, local, simple-to-ID-with-a-bit-of-help eastern edible mushrooms, where and how and why, and let you know where you might get into trouble.

              Yah, it's a book, but you can get it used on Amazon for only $20 bucks, and it's not heavy like MDM (nor would you need to slog thru keys, since there are plenty of photographs). There are a number of good books recently out geared to mushrooms of the East coast but they are not cheap and they also have more info than you need to just hunt edibles.

              Taxonomists need a lot more books in their luggage, but traveling light is good. Someday I'll learn how to do it. ;)

              Stick to the easiest mushrooms to ID for the table and you should be fine. Lotsa resources out there for ya, but as always don't eat what you don't know.

              Photo IDs are great for suggestions, but not slam dunk for safety. There's a big difference between taxonomic conjecturing and table-ready; feel confidant about your ID, from several sources, before you eat unknown wild mushrooms.

              Debbie







              --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, "Herman Brown" <herman@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Ruth,
              > Try Michael Kuo's site, http://www.mushroomexpert.com/major_groups.html.
              > Or do a search in www.google.com for "vermont mushroom key"
              > Herman Brown
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Ruth Stiles
              > To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Friday, October 01, 2010 12:12 AM
              > Subject: [MT] Vermont - online resources?
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > I'm headed to Vermont next week, does anyone have suggestions for online resources for identifying the mushrooms I find? I'm looking for websites, not books.
              >
              > This is mostly a family visit, so I won't have time for detailed study. I'm just looking for something that will help me keep from getting in trouble with an mushroom that looks like a California edible, but turns out to be something else entirely. I don't want to tour any Vermont medical facilities.
              >
              > Thanks,
              > Ruth
              >
            • debbieviess
              And here s another online and very reasonable in print source for local New England mushrooms...if Maine isn t too far away, fungally speaking, from Vermont!
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 2, 2010
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                And here's another online and very reasonable in print source for local New England mushrooms...if Maine isn't too far away, fungally speaking, from Vermont!

                Link to David Spahr's website below:

                http://www.mushroom-collecting.com/

                Have fun. The hunting should be good. It's been raining buckets pretty much since i got on a plane last Monday to come back west. Sigh.

                We look forward to seeing your finds, here there and everywhere.

                Debbie

                --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, "debbieviess" <amanitarita@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi Ruth,
                > Since your focus is on eastern edibles, and there are finite numbers of those (as well as infinite numbers of other sorts of mushrooms to compare, contrast, and confuse) I would start by printing and taking along this quick course on what NOT to eat, published by NEMF:
                >
                > http://www.nemf.org/files/lincoff/beginners/poison.html
                >
                > David Fischer also has an excellant book on edibles, "Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America", focused on food shrooms and their toxic or unpalatable lookalikes of the east coast. This one would get you most of the good, local, simple-to-ID-with-a-bit-of-help eastern edible mushrooms, where and how and why, and let you know where you might get into trouble.
                >
                > Yah, it's a book, but you can get it used on Amazon for only $20 bucks, and it's not heavy like MDM (nor would you need to slog thru keys, since there are plenty of photographs). There are a number of good books recently out geared to mushrooms of the East coast but they are not cheap and they also have more info than you need to just hunt edibles.
                >
                > Taxonomists need a lot more books in their luggage, but traveling light is good. Someday I'll learn how to do it. ;)
                >
                > Stick to the easiest mushrooms to ID for the table and you should be fine. Lotsa resources out there for ya, but as always don't eat what you don't know.
                >
                > Photo IDs are great for suggestions, but not slam dunk for safety. There's a big difference between taxonomic conjecturing and table-ready; feel confidant about your ID, from several sources, before you eat unknown wild mushrooms.
                >
                > Debbie
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, "Herman Brown" <herman@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Hi Ruth,
                > > Try Michael Kuo's site, http://www.mushroomexpert.com/major_groups.html.
                > > Or do a search in www.google.com for "vermont mushroom key"
                > > Herman Brown
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: Ruth Stiles
                > > To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                > > Sent: Friday, October 01, 2010 12:12 AM
                > > Subject: [MT] Vermont - online resources?
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > I'm headed to Vermont next week, does anyone have suggestions for online resources for identifying the mushrooms I find? I'm looking for websites, not books.
                > >
                > > This is mostly a family visit, so I won't have time for detailed study. I'm just looking for something that will help me keep from getting in trouble with an mushroom that looks like a California edible, but turns out to be something else entirely. I don't want to tour any Vermont medical facilities.
                > >
                > > Thanks,
                > > Ruth
                > >
                >
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