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Re: [MT] Wild boar eating radioactive truffles/mushrooms

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  • Tom Cruckshank
    Hey Ron, I would be wary of drawing any conclusions based on the information contained in that one online article. It cites no scientific studies and really
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 1, 2010
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      Hey Ron,

      I would be wary of drawing any conclusions based on the information contained in that one online article.  It cites no scientific studies and really doesn't address mutation or fertility.  Far more troubling to me is the assertion that  25 years after the meltdown incident wild boar are still found contaminated with radiation...in Germany, no less!  I drew the opposite conclusion from the article than you; it seems to add a minor talking point to the debate: that a disaster will persist in the environment.  It certainly is not as potent a talking point as say the vulnerability of nuclear plants to terrorism, the political concentration of power associated with the operation and control of the same, or the 800 pound gorilla of what to do with the quantities of waste that will persist and be deadly for a quarter million years or so.

      For us mushroom folks, the most interesting sentence is the one about the "particular efficiency" of fungi to absorb radioactivity.  It should be a warning and reminder to all, if not already aware, that fungi absorb toxins from their environment (remember the morels that concentrated arsenic in New Jersey apple orchards!).  Beware of where you collect.  Considering the amount of toxins that accumulate and run off of a busy road, is it wise to collect fungi adjacent?  Dimi's photos of boletes alongside hwy. 101 are one example.

      Cheers,

      tom

      On 7/31/2010 9:19 PM, RONALD PASTORINO wrote:
       Well, it's interesting that it seems that contrary to B grade science fiction movies, the increased radiation is not effecting the fertility of these wild boars, nor is it creating monstrous mutants..   There goes another talking point against nuclear power?!?
        However, I'll still pass on consuming wild German bores.
          Ron



      From: James Edmonds <jre93@...>
      To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sat, July 31, 2010 6:05:33 PM
      Subject: [MT] Wild boar eating radioactive truffles/mushrooms

       
      Here's an interesting article from Germany:

      http://www.spiegel. de/international /zeitgeist/ 0,1518,709345, 00.html


      Chernobyl radiation has continued to contaminate mushrooms and truffles in S. Germany which wild boars like to gobble up. I wouldn't eat any wild boar in Europe !

    • RONALD PASTORINO
      Tom, You are right of course in saying that one cannot draw too many conclusions from that article. I was in a mischievous mood last night. However, as DImi
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 1, 2010
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           Tom,
              You are right of course in saying that one cannot draw too many conclusions from that article.  I was in a mischievous mood last night.
        However, as DImi implies, many false cause and effect relationships can be inferred from skimpy data and a biased approach. Tort lawyers are experts in manipulating and exploiting both real and imagined "disasters".
            The real 800 lb gorilla is the human overpopulation of the planet and our inexhaustible need for space, food and energy.
            Ron
         



        From: Tom Cruckshank <SOMAnewseditor@...>
        To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, August 1, 2010 6:50:10 AM
        Subject: Re: [MT] Wild boar eating radioactive truffles/mushrooms

         

        Hey Ron,

        I would be wary of drawing any conclusions based on the information contained in that one online article.  It cites no scientific studies and really doesn't address mutation or fertility.  Far more troubling to me is the assertion that  25 years after the meltdown incident wild boar are still found contaminated with radiation... in Germany, no less!  I drew the opposite conclusion from the article than you; it seems to add a minor talking point to the debate: that a disaster will persist in the environment.  It certainly is not as potent a talking point as say the vulnerability of nuclear plants to terrorism, the political concentration of power associated with the operation and control of the same, or the 800 pound gorilla of what to do with the quantities of waste that will persist and be deadly for a quarter million years or so.

        For us mushroom folks, the most interesting sentence is the one about the "particular efficiency" of fungi to absorb radioactivity.  It should be a warning and reminder to all, if not already aware, that fungi absorb toxins from their environment (remember the morels that concentrated arsenic in New Jersey apple orchards!).  Beware of where you collect.  Considering the amount of toxins that accumulate and run off of a busy road, is it wise to collect fungi adjacent?  Dimi's photos of boletes alongside hwy. 101 are one example.

        Cheers,

        tom

        On 7/31/2010 9:19 PM, RONALD PASTORINO wrote:

         Well, it's interesting that it seems that contrary to B grade science fiction movies, the increased radiation is not effecting the fertility of these wild boars, nor is it creating monstrous mutants..   There goes another talking point against nuclear power?!?
          However, I'll still pass on consuming wild German bores.
            Ron



        From: James Edmonds <jre93@yahoo. com>
        To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
        Sent: Sat, July 31, 2010 6:05:33 PM
        Subject: [MT] Wild boar eating radioactive truffles/mushrooms

         
        Here's an interesting article from Germany:

        http://www.spiegel. de/international /zeitgeist/ 0,1518,709345, 00.html


        Chernobyl radiation has continued to contaminate mushrooms and truffles in S. Germany which wild boars like to gobble up. I wouldn't eat any wild boar in Europe !

      • James Edmonds
        I believe there isn t a mushroom in existence that doesn t contain some detectable amount of radiation or other contaminant. Besides all the fall out from
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 1, 2010
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          I believe there isn't a mushroom in existence that doesn't contain some detectable amount of radiation or other contaminant. Besides all the fall out from Chernobyl ( which did make its way to the U.S. ), you have the residual radiation from all the countries that exploded atomic bombs above ground. The U.S. exploded the most bombs....

          Food not Bombs is a good organization to donate surplus mushrooms too. They serve free meals to the homeless in Berkeley and elsewhere. I've given them chantrelles before to put in their soups.

          I think the 800lb Gorilla is human GREED.


          .:<o>:.

          From: RONALD PASTORINO <ronpast@...>
          To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sun, August 1, 2010 9:44:30 AM
          Subject: Re: [MT] Wild boar eating radioactive truffles/mushrooms

           

             Tom,
                You are right of course in saying that one cannot draw too many conclusions from that article.  I was in a mischievous mood last night.
          However, as DImi implies, many false cause and effect relationships can be inferred from skimpy data and a biased approach. Tort lawyers are experts in manipulating and exploiting both real and imagined "disasters".
              The real 800 lb gorilla is the human overpopulation of the planet and our inexhaustible need for space, food and energy.
              Ron
           



          From: Tom Cruckshank <SOMAnewseditor@ SOMAmushrooms. org>
          To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Sun, August 1, 2010 6:50:10 AM
          Subject: Re: [MT] Wild boar eating radioactive truffles/mushrooms

           

          Hey Ron,

          I would be wary of drawing any conclusions based on the information contained in that one online article.  It cites no scientific studies and really doesn't address mutation or fertility.  Far more troubling to me is the assertion that  25 years after the meltdown incident wild boar are still found contaminated with radiation... in Germany, no less!  I drew the opposite conclusion from the article than you; it seems to add a minor talking point to the debate: that a disaster will persist in the environment.  It certainly is not as potent a talking point as say the vulnerability of nuclear plants to terrorism, the political concentration of power associated with the operation and control of the same, or the 800 pound gorilla of what to do with the quantities of waste that will persist and be deadly for a quarter million years or so.

          For us mushroom folks, the most interesting sentence is the one about the "particular efficiency" of fungi to absorb radioactivity.  It should be a warning and reminder to all, if not already aware, that fungi absorb toxins from their environment (remember the morels that concentrated arsenic in New Jersey apple orchards!).  Beware of where you collect.  Considering the amount of toxins that accumulate and run off of a busy road, is it wise to collect fungi adjacent?  Dimi's photos of boletes alongside hwy. 101 are one example.

          Cheers,

          tom

          On 7/31/2010 9:19 PM, RONALD PASTORINO wrote:

           Well, it's interesting that it seems that contrary to B grade science fiction movies, the increased radiation is not effecting the fertility of these wild boars, nor is it creating monstrous mutants..   There goes another talking point against nuclear power?!?
            However, I'll still pass on consuming wild German bores.
              Ron



          From: James Edmonds <jre93@yahoo. com>
          To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Sat, July 31, 2010 6:05:33 PM
          Subject: [MT] Wild boar eating radioactive truffles/mushrooms

           
          Here's an interesting article from Germany:

          http://www.spiegel. de/international /zeitgeist/ 0,1518,709345, 00.html


          Chernobyl radiation has continued to contaminate mushrooms and truffles in S. Germany which wild boars like to gobble up. I wouldn't eat any wild boar in Europe !


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