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Re: NAMA Day 2

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  • CureCat
    Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events began, because there were No mushrooms , I guess he was not kidding! Well at
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 1, 2009
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      Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not kidding!

      Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.

      ~CC


      --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, dimitar@... wrote:
      >
      > The silver lining of many wonderful mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should tell you enough.
      >
      > D.
      >
    • debbieviess
      Not just in LA...for several years now these NAMA forays have been unlucky in their timing and ground conditions, through no fault of NAMA of course. Drought
      Message 2 of 14 , Dec 1, 2009
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        Not just in LA...for several years now these NAMA forays have been unlucky in their timing and ground conditions, through no fault of NAMA of course. Drought conditions have been widespread, from CA to the SE, and nobody can predict the weather a year in advance (or even weeks in advance). Still, we gotta work with what we have...and this Louisiana foray was fabulous in terms of mushroomers if not mushrooms!

        Change is afoot in the organization, and new blood and new ideas might just create a happy rennaisance. The mushrooms are gonna do what they do, regardless of us humans.

        News flash: My hubby David Rust was surprised and delighted to receive this year's NAMA President's Award...in recognition of all his hard work in revitalizing the NAMA website. It's the hard-working and good natured folks in any group who help make an organization thrive. The strong show of support by all of the professional mycologists who showed up for this event, despite the mushroom paucity, gives me hope for the continuation of this important, national mycologists umbrella organization.

        And being a happy northern California mushroomer, b'God I already have more mushrooms than I know what to do with!

        Every year is different; what a peach this season is.

        Debbie Viess
        Bay Area Mycological Society
        www.bayareamushrooms.org



        --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, "CureCat" <curecatpfil@...> wrote:
        >
        > Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not kidding!
        >
        > Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.
        >
        > ~CC
        >
        >
        > --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, dimitar@ wrote:
        > >
        > > The silver lining of many wonderful mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should tell you enough.
        > >
        > > D.
        > >
        >
      • Dimitar Bojantchev
        As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same period, perhaps one week
        Message 3 of 14 , Dec 1, 2009
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          As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere.  I looked in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the presence of good moisture.
           
          And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region. With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.

          In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected, but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork. But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and the overall organization.

          The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO. It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about the selections they make.
           
           
                  D.
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: CureCat
          Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49 AM
          Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

           

          Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not kidding!

          Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.

          ~CC

          --- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com, dimitar@... wrote:
          >
          > The silver lining of many wonderful mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should tell you enough.
          >
          > D.
          >

        • Tom Cruckshank
          I was in LA, about 1 hour north of NO, in August of 2008. I did find a few things in lawns etc. around the motel. I did not forage as time did not permit. I
          Message 4 of 14 , Dec 1, 2009
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            I was in LA, about 1 hour north of NO, in August of 2008.  I did find a few things in lawns etc. around the motel.  I did not forage as time did not permit.  I remember speaking with some local who knew little about mushrooms but did say he picked and ate one kind.  Questions elicited that they were probably chanterelles and he said there were lots of them.  I didn't get a when.  Hearsay and anecdotal, I know, but it is what I have for LA.

            Dimitar Bojantchev wrote:
            As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere.  I looked in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the presence of good moisture.
             
            And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region. With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.

            In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected, but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork. But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and the overall organization.

            The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO. It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about the selections they make.
             
             
                    D.
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: CureCat
            Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49 AM
            Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

             

            Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not kidding!

            Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.

            ~CC

            --- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com, dimitar@... wrote:
            >
            > The silver lining of many wonderful mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should tell you enough.
            >
            > D.
            >

          • RONALD PASTORINO
            Having spent 3 years in NW La. and a few more in CT. and attending several NAMA Forays over the years, I d say you stand the best chance of getting the maximum
            Message 5 of 14 , Dec 1, 2009
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               Having spent 3 years in NW La. and a few more in CT. and attending several NAMA Forays over the years, I'd say you stand the best chance of getting the maximum number of species and variety by scheduling the event in early to mid Sept in just about any part of the country from the Rockies east to the Atlantic Ocean.
                The central South and Southeast have a little more leeway because of the more temperate climate.   But scheduling a foray in even LA. in Late Nov. is very questionable and certainly known by anyone in the area.   In that area, one can even get good variety starting  in early June.  In much of the country east of the Rockies, July and parts of August can be iffy due to prolonged dry weeks.
                In the past NAMA has actually been pretty good  about scheduling in peak times for the particular area in which it was being held.   But recently, with the proliferation of Mushroom events and Forays, perhaps too many other considerations have entered the decision making process.
                 Ron


              From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
              To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tue, December 1, 2009 8:51:27 AM
              Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

               

              As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere.  I looked in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the presence of good moisture.
               
              And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region. With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.

              In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected, but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork. But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and the overall organization.

              The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO. It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about the selections they make.
               
               
                      D.
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: CureCat
              Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49 AM
              Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

               

              Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not kidding!

              Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.

              ~CC

              --- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com, dimitar@... wrote:
              >
              > The silver lining of many wonderful mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should tell you enough.
              >
              > D.
              >

            • debbieviess
              I don t think that any of us can really make these blanket statements about folks in NAMA or best foray dates...the weather, our primary cause of great
              Message 6 of 14 , Dec 1, 2009
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                I don't think that any of us can really make these blanket statements about folks in NAMA or "best" foray dates...the weather, our primary cause of great mushrooming and the bad, has been unpredictable at best. My mid-August foray at Crested Butte in 2006(same time as the scheduled NAMA foray in 2010) was some of the best mushrooming of my life! and some of the best for the CO locals, too...

                Tom Volk surely knows when the mushrooms fruit in WI, but his NAMA foray was a fungal bust too...damnable drought was the reason, not lousy date selection. Plus, I suppose, the need for cheap housing on campus over the summer...

                AS to folks not caring if you can get out into the field or not...not so! All of the NAMA field forays that I have been on have been packed with folks, and what's wrong with wanting to hear a lecture by the top mycologists in the field? Just like the majority of most of the club members nationwide, most folks are in it for the edibles...taxonomists as a subgroup are waaaaay down in member numbers. Now if I had spent a couple of fruitless days in the field in LA, I might be tempted to sit in on some great lectures, instead of chasing my own tail in the shroomless woods, too.

                But so what? The beauty of mycology is that anyone can find a place in it, for any reason: photography, food, taxonomy, medicine, whathaveyou. Mycologists wear many hats...and WTF is that ageist shit Dimi? Only young people want to do taxonomy and get into the field? Nonsense. Age has nothing to do with it; the demographics are pretty much the same in all mushroom clubs, with foodies taking the lions share of memberships. That's OK by me...somebody has to eat those nasty things! Although sometimes mobility is an issue for much older folks, the downside of not dying young, I guess. On the other hand, look at Larry Stickney...it's safe to say he''ll be out in the field well into his 80s even if he has to crawl!

                Any date that is picked for a foray is subject to the whims of nature, and that is something that is out of our hands. Still, we must carry on. Mustn't we?

                Debbie Viess

                ps fun collecting in Oakland today...I found a way cool, colorful, slime veiled hygrophorus...photos on MO later.

                --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, RONALD PASTORINO <ronpast@...> wrote:
                >
                > Having spent 3 years in NW La. and a few more in CT. and attending several NAMA Forays over the years, I'd say you stand the best chance of getting the maximum number of species and variety by scheduling the event in early to mid Sept in just about any part of the country from the Rockies east to the Atlantic Ocean.
                > The central South and Southeast have a little more leeway because of the more temperate climate. But scheduling a foray in even LA. in Late Nov. is very questionable and certainly known by anyone in the area. In that area, one can even get good variety starting in early June. In much of the country east of the Rockies, July and parts of August can be iffy due to prolonged dry weeks.
                > In the past NAMA has actually been pretty good about scheduling in peak times for the particular area in which it was being held. But recently, with the proliferation of Mushroom events and Forays, perhaps too many other considerations have entered the decision making process.
                > Ron
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
                > To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Tue, December 1, 2009 8:51:27 AM
                > Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                >
                >
                > As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA
                > foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same
                > period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the
                > collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere. I looked
                > in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the
                > presence of good moisture.
                >
                > And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one
                > of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I
                > go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region.
                > With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people
                > draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I
                > hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast
                > area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit
                > now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.
                >
                > In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of
                > other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected,
                > but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core
                > level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who
                > have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime
                > interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms
                > in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies
                > are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors
                > attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as
                > these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork.
                > But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly
                > disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go
                > in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater
                > predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and
                > growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and
                > the overall organization.
                >
                > The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO.
                > It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not
                > the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early
                > Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are
                > the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about
                > the selections they make.
                >
                >
                > D.
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > >From: CureCat
                > >To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                > >Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49
                > > AM
                > >Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day
                > > 2
                > >
                > >
                > >Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events
                > > began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not
                > > kidding!
                > >
                > >Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.
                > >
                > >
                > >~CC
                > >
                > >--- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com,
                > > dimitar@ wrote:
                > >>
                > >> The silver lining of many wonderful
                > > mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time
                > > to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours
                > > with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable
                > > insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are
                > > trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've
                > > had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I
                > > walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should
                > > tell you enough.
                > >>
                > >> D.
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                >
              • Dimitar Bojantchev
                Thank you Ron, I think that a better picture is starting to emerge now. Here in a case of comparative collecting -- B.W, Freyburger just wrote to me in a
                Message 7 of 14 , Dec 1, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  
                  Thank you Ron,
                   
                  I think that a better picture is starting to emerge now.
                   
                  Here in a case of comparative collecting -- B.W, Freyburger just wrote to me in a private email about finding a bunch of interesting species some July, years ago, in one of these beautiful Mississippi Welcoming Centers off I-10 that look like an "ante-bellum plantation mansion" [quot]. I looked  extensively at that same location too, there is the NASA Stennis Space Center too.
                   
                   
                  The habitat caught my eye while traveling on the highway with the gorgeous Longleaf Pines  (Pinus palustris) interspersed with some very large Southern Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) trees. All I found was this little Amanita -- I suspect muscaria var. guessowii... This is the best case of comparing notes about a location and clearly show that despite the good moisture content this was way too late in the season.
                   
                   
                  =====
                   
                  Then I decided to quit the mushrooms business entirely and use whatever time I had to do some naval sightseeing in Mobile, AL -- from BB-60 "Alabama" to absolutely the latest stuff -- the Littoral Combat Ship USS "Independence" (LCS-2)
                   
                   
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 12:49 PM
                  Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                   

                   Having spent 3 years in NW La. and a few more in CT. and attending several NAMA Forays over the years, I'd say you stand the best chance of getting the maximum number of species and variety by scheduling the event in early to mid Sept in just about any part of the country from the Rockies east to the Atlantic Ocean.
                    The central South and Southeast have a little more leeway because of the more temperate climate.   But scheduling a foray in even LA. in Late Nov. is very questionable and certainly known by anyone in the area.   In that area, one can even get good variety starting  in early June.  In much of the country east of the Rockies, July and parts of August can be iffy due to prolonged dry weeks.
                    In the past NAMA has actually been pretty good  about scheduling in peak times for the particular area in which it was being held.   But recently, with the proliferation of Mushroom events and Forays, perhaps too many other considerations have entered the decision making process.
                     Ron


                  From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                  To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Tue, December 1, 2009 8:51:27 AM
                  Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                   

                  As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere.  I looked in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the presence of good moisture.
                   
                  And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region. With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.

                  In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected, but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork. But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and the overall organization.

                  The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO. It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about the selections they make.
                   
                   
                          D.
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: CureCat
                  Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49 AM
                  Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                   

                  Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not kidding!

                  Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.

                  ~CC

                  --- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com, dimitar@... wrote:
                  >
                  > The silver lining of many wonderful mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should tell you enough.
                  >
                  > D.
                  >

                • Dimitar Bojantchev
                  Ouch, Debbie chill out a bit -- you ll get me into trouble with the NAMA folks. I didn t mean to be harsh and I do not consider myself young either.. All I was
                  Message 8 of 14 , Dec 1, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment

                    Ouch,Debbie chill out a bit -- you'll get me into trouble with the NAMA folks. I didn't mean to be harsh and I do not consider myself young either.. All I was saying that good collecting based on statistically highest likelihood of variety is not to be underestimated as the best method to attract children and really young people (5-20 years of age). They would like that better than sitting on a lecture, even if it is fascinating. That's all -- please, do not imply age discrimination in my somewhat "tongue in cheek" comments...

                     

                             D.

                     

                     

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 1:48 PM
                    Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                     

                    I don't think that any of us can really make these blanket statements about folks in NAMA or "best" foray dates...the weather, our primary cause of great mushrooming and the bad, has been unpredictable at best. My mid-August foray at Crested Butte in 2006(same time as the scheduled NAMA foray in 2010) was some of the best mushrooming of my life! and some of the best for the CO locals, too...

                    Tom Volk surely knows when the mushrooms fruit in WI, but his NAMA foray was a fungal bust too...damnable drought was the reason, not lousy date selection. Plus, I suppose, the need for cheap housing on campus over the summer...

                    AS to folks not caring if you can get out into the field or not...not so! All of the NAMA field forays that I have been on have been packed with folks, and what's wrong with wanting to hear a lecture by the top mycologists in the field? Just like the majority of most of the club members nationwide, most folks are in it for the edibles...taxonomis ts as a subgroup are waaaaay down in member numbers. Now if I had spent a couple of fruitless days in the field in LA, I might be tempted to sit in on some great lectures, instead of chasing my own tail in the shroomless woods, too.

                    But so what? The beauty of mycology is that anyone can find a place in it, for any reason: photography, food, taxonomy, medicine, whathaveyou. Mycologists wear many hats...and WTF is that ageist shit Dimi? Only young people want to do taxonomy and get into the field? Nonsense. Age has nothing to do with it; the demographics are pretty much the same in all mushroom clubs, with foodies taking the lions share of memberships. That's OK by me...somebody has to eat those nasty things! Although sometimes mobility is an issue for much older folks, the downside of not dying young, I guess. On the other hand, look at Larry Stickney...it' s safe to say he''ll be out in the field well into his 80s even if he has to crawl!

                    Any date that is picked for a foray is subject to the whims of nature, and that is something that is out of our hands. Still, we must carry on. Mustn't we?

                    Debbie Viess

                    ps fun collecting in Oakland today...I found a way cool, colorful, slime veiled hygrophorus. ..photos on MO later.

                    --- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com, RONALD PASTORINO <ronpast@... > wrote:
                    >
                    > Having spent 3 years in NW La. and a few more in CT. and attending several NAMA Forays over the years, I'd say you stand the best chance of getting the maximum number of species and variety by scheduling the event in early to mid Sept in just about any part of the country from the Rockies east to the Atlantic Ocean.
                    > The central South and Southeast have a little more leeway because of the more temperate climate. But scheduling a foray in even LA. in Late Nov. is very questionable and certainly known by anyone in the area. In that area, one can even get good variety starting in early June. In much of the country east of the Rockies, July and parts of August can be iffy due to prolonged dry weeks.
                    > In the past NAMA has actually been pretty good about scheduling in peak times for the particular area in which it was being held. But recently, with the proliferation of Mushroom events and Forays, perhaps too many other considerations have entered the decision making process.
                    > Ron
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ____________ _________ _________ __
                    > From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@... >
                    > To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                    > Sent: Tue, December 1, 2009 8:51:27 AM
                    > Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                    >
                    >
                    > As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA
                    > foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same
                    > period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the
                    > collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere. I looked
                    > in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the
                    > presence of good moisture.
                    >
                    > And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one
                    > of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I
                    > go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region.
                    > With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people
                    > draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I
                    > hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast
                    > area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit
                    > now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.
                    >
                    > In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of
                    > other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected,
                    > but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core
                    > level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who
                    > have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime
                    > interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms
                    > in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies
                    > are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors
                    > attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as
                    > these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork.
                    > But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly
                    > disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go
                    > in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater
                    > predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and
                    > growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and
                    > the overall organization.
                    >
                    > The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO.
                    > It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not
                    > the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early
                    > Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are
                    > the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about
                    > the selections they make.
                    >
                    >
                    > D.
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > >From: CureCat
                    > >To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                    > >Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49
                    > > AM
                    > >Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day
                    > > 2
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events
                    > > began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not
                    > > kidding!
                    > >
                    > >Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >~CC
                    > >
                    > >--- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com,
                    > > dimitar@ wrote:
                    > >>
                    > >> The silver lining of many wonderful
                    > > mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time
                    > > to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours
                    > > with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable
                    > > insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are
                    > > trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've
                    > > had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I
                    > > walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should
                    > > tell you enough.
                    > >>
                    > >> D.
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >
                    >

                  • debbieviess
                    My apologies. I think it is safe to say that most children would be bored to tears at most mycological functions, regardless of fungi in the field. Fungal
                    Message 9 of 14 , Dec 2, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      My apologies.

                      I think it is safe to say that most children would be bored to tears at most mycological functions, regardless of fungi in the field. Fungal statistics as to when mushrooms were there aren't much help when the rains don't come.

                      I think that one of the problems with getting young folks (twenties and even thirties) to some of these NAMA functions is more about cost....it's expensive to fly across the country and stay in hotels.
                      I think that NAMA should have more regional forays on their docket.
                      Wildacres in NC is always well attended. But even that traditional foray has bad years when it doesn't rain. Same time each year. Last year was great...but that was just the luck of the draw.

                      Debbie

                      --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, "Dimitar Bojantchev" <dimitar@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Ouch, Debbie chill out a bit -- you'll get me into trouble with the NAMA folks. I didn't mean to be harsh and I do not consider myself young either.. All I was saying that good collecting based on statistically highest likelihood of variety is not to be underestimated as the best method to attract children and really young people (5-20 years of age). They would like that better than sitting on a lecture, even if it is fascinating. That's all -- please, do not imply age discrimination in my somewhat "tongue in cheek" comments...
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > D.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: debbieviess
                      > To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 1:48 PM
                      > Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I don't think that any of us can really make these blanket statements about folks in NAMA or "best" foray dates...the weather, our primary cause of great mushrooming and the bad, has been unpredictable at best. My mid-August foray at Crested Butte in 2006(same time as the scheduled NAMA foray in 2010) was some of the best mushrooming of my life! and some of the best for the CO locals, too...
                      >
                      > Tom Volk surely knows when the mushrooms fruit in WI, but his NAMA foray was a fungal bust too...damnable drought was the reason, not lousy date selection. Plus, I suppose, the need for cheap housing on campus over the summer...
                      >
                      > AS to folks not caring if you can get out into the field or not...not so! All of the NAMA field forays that I have been on have been packed with folks, and what's wrong with wanting to hear a lecture by the top mycologists in the field? Just like the majority of most of the club members nationwide, most folks are in it for the edibles...taxonomists as a subgroup are waaaaay down in member numbers. Now if I had spent a couple of fruitless days in the field in LA, I might be tempted to sit in on some great lectures, instead of chasing my own tail in the shroomless woods, too.
                      >
                      > But so what? The beauty of mycology is that anyone can find a place in it, for any reason: photography, food, taxonomy, medicine, whathaveyou. Mycologists wear many hats...and WTF is that ageist shit Dimi? Only young people want to do taxonomy and get into the field? Nonsense. Age has nothing to do with it; the demographics are pretty much the same in all mushroom clubs, with foodies taking the lions share of memberships. That's OK by me...somebody has to eat those nasty things! Although sometimes mobility is an issue for much older folks, the downside of not dying young, I guess. On the other hand, look at Larry Stickney...it's safe to say he''ll be out in the field well into his 80s even if he has to crawl!
                      >
                      > Any date that is picked for a foray is subject to the whims of nature, and that is something that is out of our hands. Still, we must carry on. Mustn't we?
                      >
                      > Debbie Viess
                      >
                      > ps fun collecting in Oakland today...I found a way cool, colorful, slime veiled hygrophorus...photos on MO later.
                      >
                      > --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, RONALD PASTORINO <ronpast@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Having spent 3 years in NW La. and a few more in CT. and attending several NAMA Forays over the years, I'd say you stand the best chance of getting the maximum number of species and variety by scheduling the event in early to mid Sept in just about any part of the country from the Rockies east to the Atlantic Ocean.
                      > > The central South and Southeast have a little more leeway because of the more temperate climate. But scheduling a foray in even LA. in Late Nov. is very questionable and certainly known by anyone in the area. In that area, one can even get good variety starting in early June. In much of the country east of the Rockies, July and parts of August can be iffy due to prolonged dry weeks.
                      > > In the past NAMA has actually been pretty good about scheduling in peak times for the particular area in which it was being held. But recently, with the proliferation of Mushroom events and Forays, perhaps too many other considerations have entered the decision making process.
                      > > Ron
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ________________________________
                      > > From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@>
                      > > To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Sent: Tue, December 1, 2009 8:51:27 AM
                      > > Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA
                      > > foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same
                      > > period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the
                      > > collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere. I looked
                      > > in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the
                      > > presence of good moisture.
                      > >
                      > > And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one
                      > > of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I
                      > > go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region.
                      > > With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people
                      > > draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I
                      > > hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast
                      > > area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit
                      > > now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.
                      > >
                      > > In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of
                      > > other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected,
                      > > but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core
                      > > level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who
                      > > have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime
                      > > interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms
                      > > in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies
                      > > are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors
                      > > attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as
                      > > these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork.
                      > > But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly
                      > > disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go
                      > > in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater
                      > > predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and
                      > > growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and
                      > > the overall organization.
                      > >
                      > > The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO.
                      > > It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not
                      > > the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early
                      > > Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are
                      > > the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about
                      > > the selections they make.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > D.
                      > >
                      > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > >From: CureCat
                      > > >To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                      > > >Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49
                      > > > AM
                      > > >Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day
                      > > > 2
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events
                      > > > began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not
                      > > > kidding!
                      > > >
                      > > >Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >~CC
                      > > >
                      > > >--- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com,
                      > > > dimitar@ wrote:
                      > > >>
                      > > >> The silver lining of many wonderful
                      > > > mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time
                      > > > to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours
                      > > > with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable
                      > > > insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are
                      > > > trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've
                      > > > had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I
                      > > > walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should
                      > > > tell you enough.
                      > > >>
                      > > >> D.
                      > > >>
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Dimitar Bojantchev
                      Oh, what I should have said is that I expressed a general sentiment that was shared by a few other folks, as well as it all came in the context of some meeting
                      Message 10 of 14 , Dec 2, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Oh, what I should have said is that I expressed a general sentiment that was shared by a few other folks, as well as it all came in the context of some meeting of how to increase to outreach of NAMA.
                         
                        In that respect, seeing material in the field is important -- my dilemma is this -- next time my son wants to join, but if it is going to be so little collecting I know that he will be disappointed and young people can form long lasting opinions on such things as NAMA, etc. B.W. Freyburger felt that mid-August in Colorado is Ok, but I cannot fail to note that both Mykoblitzes there were scheduled for September as well as my own collecting confirms it as a higher probability for good variety and less chance of a total bust. Yes, conditions vary, but we can do our share in planning to try to minimize the impact of bad season impact.
                         
                        And finally -- I was there when David Rust received the NAMA award -- deservedly so for a job well done on the NAMA Web site and overall being full of positive ideas of more things to do and better so. Also, it is nice to have local representations in such National events as tit helps with introductions, etc.  I also pitch local Clubs, events and personalities that may be of interest to a wider audience.
                         
                                D.
                         
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Wednesday, December 02, 2009 7:57 AM
                        Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                         

                        My apologies.

                        I think it is safe to say that most children would be bored to tears at most mycological functions, regardless of fungi in the field. Fungal statistics as to when mushrooms were there aren't much help when the rains don't come.

                        I think that one of the problems with getting young folks (twenties and even thirties) to some of these NAMA functions is more about cost....it's expensive to fly across the country and stay in hotels.
                        I think that NAMA should have more regional forays on their docket.
                        Wildacres in NC is always well attended. But even that traditional foray has bad years when it doesn't rain. Same time each year. Last year was great...but that was just the luck of the draw.

                        Debbie

                        --- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com, "Dimitar Bojantchev" <dimitar@... > wrote:
                        >
                        > Ouch, Debbie chill out a bit -- you'll get me into trouble with the NAMA folks. I didn't mean to be harsh and I do not consider myself young either.. All I was saying that good collecting based on statistically highest likelihood of variety is not to be underestimated as the best method to attract children and really young people (5-20 years of age). They would like that better than sitting on a lecture, even if it is fascinating. That's all -- please, do not imply age discrimination in my somewhat "tongue in cheek" comments...
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > D.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: debbieviess
                        > To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                        > Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 1:48 PM
                        > Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I don't think that any of us can really make these blanket statements about folks in NAMA or "best" foray dates...the weather, our primary cause of great mushrooming and the bad, has been unpredictable at best. My mid-August foray at Crested Butte in 2006(same time as the scheduled NAMA foray in 2010) was some of the best mushrooming of my life! and some of the best for the CO locals, too...
                        >
                        > Tom Volk surely knows when the mushrooms fruit in WI, but his NAMA foray was a fungal bust too...damnable drought was the reason, not lousy date selection. Plus, I suppose, the need for cheap housing on campus over the summer...
                        >
                        > AS to folks not caring if you can get out into the field or not...not so! All of the NAMA field forays that I have been on have been packed with folks, and what's wrong with wanting to hear a lecture by the top mycologists in the field? Just like the majority of most of the club members nationwide, most folks are in it for the edibles...taxonomis ts as a subgroup are waaaaay down in member numbers. Now if I had spent a couple of fruitless days in the field in LA, I might be tempted to sit in on some great lectures, instead of chasing my own tail in the shroomless woods, too.
                        >
                        > But so what? The beauty of mycology is that anyone can find a place in it, for any reason: photography, food, taxonomy, medicine, whathaveyou. Mycologists wear many hats...and WTF is that ageist shit Dimi? Only young people want to do taxonomy and get into the field? Nonsense. Age has nothing to do with it; the demographics are pretty much the same in all mushroom clubs, with foodies taking the lions share of memberships. That's OK by me...somebody has to eat those nasty things! Although sometimes mobility is an issue for much older folks, the downside of not dying young, I guess. On the other hand, look at Larry Stickney...it' s safe to say he''ll be out in the field well into his 80s even if he has to crawl!
                        >
                        > Any date that is picked for a foray is subject to the whims of nature, and that is something that is out of our hands. Still, we must carry on. Mustn't we?
                        >
                        > Debbie Viess
                        >
                        > ps fun collecting in Oakland today...I found a way cool, colorful, slime veiled hygrophorus. ..photos on MO later.
                        >
                        > --- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com, RONALD PASTORINO <ronpast@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Having spent 3 years in NW La. and a few more in CT. and attending several NAMA Forays over the years, I'd say you stand the best chance of getting the maximum number of species and variety by scheduling the event in early to mid Sept in just about any part of the country from the Rockies east to the Atlantic Ocean.
                        > > The central South and Southeast have a little more leeway because of the more temperate climate. But scheduling a foray in even LA. in Late Nov. is very questionable and certainly known by anyone in the area. In that area, one can even get good variety starting in early June. In much of the country east of the Rockies, July and parts of August can be iffy due to prolonged dry weeks.
                        > > In the past NAMA has actually been pretty good about scheduling in peak times for the particular area in which it was being held. But recently, with the proliferation of Mushroom events and Forays, perhaps too many other considerations have entered the decision making process.
                        > > Ron
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > ____________ _________ _________ __
                        > > From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@>
                        > > To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                        > > Sent: Tue, December 1, 2009 8:51:27 AM
                        > > Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA
                        > > foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same
                        > > period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the
                        > > collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere. I looked
                        > > in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the
                        > > presence of good moisture.
                        > >
                        > > And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one
                        > > of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I
                        > > go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region.
                        > > With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people
                        > > draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I
                        > > hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast
                        > > area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit
                        > > now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.
                        > >
                        > > In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of
                        > > other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected,
                        > > but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core
                        > > level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who
                        > > have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime
                        > > interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms
                        > > in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies
                        > > are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors
                        > > attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as
                        > > these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork.
                        > > But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly
                        > > disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go
                        > > in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater
                        > > predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and
                        > > growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and
                        > > the overall organization.
                        > >
                        > > The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO.
                        > > It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not
                        > > the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early
                        > > Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are
                        > > the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about
                        > > the selections they make.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > D.
                        > >
                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > >From: CureCat
                        > > >To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                        > > >Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49
                        > > > AM
                        > > >Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day
                        > > > 2
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events
                        > > > began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not
                        > > > kidding!
                        > > >
                        > > >Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >~CC
                        > > >
                        > > >--- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com,
                        > > > dimitar@ wrote:
                        > > >>
                        > > >> The silver lining of many wonderful
                        > > > mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time
                        > > > to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours
                        > > > with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable
                        > > > insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are
                        > > > trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've
                        > > > had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I
                        > > > walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should
                        > > > tell you enough.
                        > > >>
                        > > >> D.
                        > > >>
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >

                      • debbieviess
                        Well, the two recent CO Mycoblitzes may have been scheduled for Sept., but I suspect that is because Colorado mushroomers are otherwise occupied in August with
                        Message 11 of 14 , Dec 2, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Well, the two recent CO Mycoblitzes may have been scheduled for Sept., but I suspect that is because Colorado mushroomers are otherwise occupied in August with other, long-standing mushroom
                          events, like the CMS Fair, Telluride and recently(but not last year), the Crested Butte Mushroom Festival. And perhaps the CO Mycoblitz was also scheduled so as to not conflict with the summer tourist season in Rocky Mtn. National Park. Rob Hallock, the organizer, would know more about all of this.

                          I still think that serendipity plays a huge part in whether or not the fungi are in the field, and kids be darned, I greatly prefer a foray with fungi, too. Who doesn't? Call me naive, but isn't that THE POINT???

                          Try taking Alex to Wildacres next year...the odds are good that the shrooms will be great. You'll love those thick and drippy fir forests atop Mt. Mitchell...and cruising along the rich mushroom habitat of the Blue Ridge Parkway, plus good accomodations and food in an historically significant resort. Oh yeah, the taxonomists are great, too.

                          This is the SE NAMA foray that locals get all dewey-eyed over, and with good reason.

                          Debbie

                          In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, "Dimitar Bojantchev" <dimitar@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Oh, what I should have said is that I expressed a general sentiment that was shared by a few other folks, as well as it all came in the context of some meeting of how to increase to outreach of NAMA.
                          >
                          > In that respect, seeing material in the field is important -- my dilemma is this -- next time my son wants to join, but if it is going to be so little collecting I know that he will be disappointed and young people can form long lasting opinions on such things as NAMA, etc. B.W. Freyburger felt that mid-August in Colorado is Ok, but I cannot fail to note that both Mykoblitzes there were scheduled for September as well as my own collecting confirms it as a higher probability for good variety and less chance of a total bust. Yes, conditions vary, but we can do our share in planning to try to minimize the impact of bad season impact.
                          >
                          > And finally -- I was there when David Rust received the NAMA award -- deservedly so for a job well done on the NAMA Web site and overall being full of positive ideas of more things to do and better so. Also, it is nice to have local representations in such National events as tit helps with introductions, etc. I also pitch local Clubs, events and personalities that may be of interest to a wider audience.
                          >
                          > D.
                          >
                          >
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: debbieviess
                          > To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Wednesday, December 02, 2009 7:57 AM
                          > Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > My apologies.
                          >
                          > I think it is safe to say that most children would be bored to tears at most mycological functions, regardless of fungi in the field. Fungal statistics as to when mushrooms were there aren't much help when the rains don't come.
                          >
                          > I think that one of the problems with getting young folks (twenties and even thirties) to some of these NAMA functions is more about cost....it's expensive to fly across the country and stay in hotels.
                          > I think that NAMA should have more regional forays on their docket.
                          > Wildacres in NC is always well attended. But even that traditional foray has bad years when it doesn't rain. Same time each year. Last year was great...but that was just the luck of the draw.
                          >
                          > Debbie
                          >
                          > --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, "Dimitar Bojantchev" <dimitar@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Ouch, Debbie chill out a bit -- you'll get me into trouble with the NAMA folks. I didn't mean to be harsh and I do not consider myself young either.. All I was saying that good collecting based on statistically highest likelihood of variety is not to be underestimated as the best method to attract children and really young people (5-20 years of age). They would like that better than sitting on a lecture, even if it is fascinating. That's all -- please, do not imply age discrimination in my somewhat "tongue in cheek" comments...
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > D.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > ----- Original Message -----
                          > > From: debbieviess
                          > > To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                          > > Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 1:48 PM
                          > > Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > I don't think that any of us can really make these blanket statements about folks in NAMA or "best" foray dates...the weather, our primary cause of great mushrooming and the bad, has been unpredictable at best. My mid-August foray at Crested Butte in 2006(same time as the scheduled NAMA foray in 2010) was some of the best mushrooming of my life! and some of the best for the CO locals, too...
                          > >
                          > > Tom Volk surely knows when the mushrooms fruit in WI, but his NAMA foray was a fungal bust too...damnable drought was the reason, not lousy date selection. Plus, I suppose, the need for cheap housing on campus over the summer...
                          > >
                          > > AS to folks not caring if you can get out into the field or not...not so! All of the NAMA field forays that I have been on have been packed with folks, and what's wrong with wanting to hear a lecture by the top mycologists in the field? Just like the majority of most of the club members nationwide, most folks are in it for the edibles...taxonomists as a subgroup are waaaaay down in member numbers. Now if I had spent a couple of fruitless days in the field in LA, I might be tempted to sit in on some great lectures, instead of chasing my own tail in the shroomless woods, too.
                          > >
                          > > But so what? The beauty of mycology is that anyone can find a place in it, for any reason: photography, food, taxonomy, medicine, whathaveyou. Mycologists wear many hats...and WTF is that ageist shit Dimi? Only young people want to do taxonomy and get into the field? Nonsense. Age has nothing to do with it; the demographics are pretty much the same in all mushroom clubs, with foodies taking the lions share of memberships. That's OK by me...somebody has to eat those nasty things! Although sometimes mobility is an issue for much older folks, the downside of not dying young, I guess. On the other hand, look at Larry Stickney...it's safe to say he''ll be out in the field well into his 80s even if he has to crawl!
                          > >
                          > > Any date that is picked for a foray is subject to the whims of nature, and that is something that is out of our hands. Still, we must carry on. Mustn't we?
                          > >
                          > > Debbie Viess
                          > >
                          > > ps fun collecting in Oakland today...I found a way cool, colorful, slime veiled hygrophorus...photos on MO later.
                          > >
                          > > --- In MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com, RONALD PASTORINO <ronpast@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Having spent 3 years in NW La. and a few more in CT. and attending several NAMA Forays over the years, I'd say you stand the best chance of getting the maximum number of species and variety by scheduling the event in early to mid Sept in just about any part of the country from the Rockies east to the Atlantic Ocean.
                          > > > The central South and Southeast have a little more leeway because of the more temperate climate. But scheduling a foray in even LA. in Late Nov. is very questionable and certainly known by anyone in the area. In that area, one can even get good variety starting in early June. In much of the country east of the Rockies, July and parts of August can be iffy due to prolonged dry weeks.
                          > > > In the past NAMA has actually been pretty good about scheduling in peak times for the particular area in which it was being held. But recently, with the proliferation of Mushroom events and Forays, perhaps too many other considerations have entered the decision making process.
                          > > > Ron
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > ________________________________
                          > > > From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@>
                          > > > To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                          > > > Sent: Tue, December 1, 2009 8:51:27 AM
                          > > > Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA
                          > > > foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same
                          > > > period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the
                          > > > collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere. I looked
                          > > > in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the
                          > > > presence of good moisture.
                          > > >
                          > > > And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one
                          > > > of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I
                          > > > go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region.
                          > > > With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people
                          > > > draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I
                          > > > hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast
                          > > > area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit
                          > > > now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.
                          > > >
                          > > > In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of
                          > > > other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected,
                          > > > but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core
                          > > > level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who
                          > > > have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime
                          > > > interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms
                          > > > in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies
                          > > > are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors
                          > > > attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as
                          > > > these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork.
                          > > > But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly
                          > > > disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go
                          > > > in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater
                          > > > predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and
                          > > > growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and
                          > > > the overall organization.
                          > > >
                          > > > The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO.
                          > > > It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not
                          > > > the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early
                          > > > Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are
                          > > > the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about
                          > > > the selections they make.
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > D.
                          > > >
                          > > > ----- Original Message -----
                          > > > >From: CureCat
                          > > > >To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                          > > > >Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49
                          > > > > AM
                          > > > >Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day
                          > > > > 2
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > >Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events
                          > > > > began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not
                          > > > > kidding!
                          > > > >
                          > > > >Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > >~CC
                          > > > >
                          > > > >--- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com,
                          > > > > dimitar@ wrote:
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >> The silver lining of many wonderful
                          > > > > mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time
                          > > > > to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours
                          > > > > with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable
                          > > > > insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are
                          > > > > trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've
                          > > > > had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I
                          > > > > walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should
                          > > > > tell you enough.
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >> D.
                          > > > >>
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • Patrick Hamilton
                          I did a restaurant in Boulder in the early 90 s and August was indeed the month for such things as porcini. Problem is that it is so dry there that if no rain
                          Message 12 of 14 , Dec 2, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I did a restaurant in Boulder in the early 90's and August was indeed the month for such things as porcini.  Problem is that it is so dry there that if no rain falls there can be zilch.  BTW--Telluride Mushroom Festival is usually in late August.
                            Regards,
                            Patrick


                            From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
                            To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Wed, December 2, 2009 9:10:21 AM
                            Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                             

                            Oh, what I should have said is that I expressed a general sentiment that was shared by a few other folks, as well as it all came in the context of some meeting of how to increase to outreach of NAMA.
                             
                            In that respect, seeing material in the field is important -- my dilemma is this -- next time my son wants to join, but if it is going to be so little collecting I know that he will be disappointed and young people can form long lasting opinions on such things as NAMA, etc. B.W. Freyburger felt that mid-August in Colorado is Ok, but I cannot fail to note that both Mykoblitzes there were scheduled for September as well as my own collecting confirms it as a higher probability for good variety and less chance of a total bust. Yes, conditions vary, but we can do our share in planning to try to minimize the impact of bad season impact.
                             
                            And finally -- I was there when David Rust received the NAMA award -- deservedly so for a job well done on the NAMA Web site and overall being full of positive ideas of more things to do and better so. Also, it is nice to have local representations in such National events as tit helps with introductions, etc.  I also pitch local Clubs, events and personalities that may be of interest to a wider audience.
                             
                                    D.
                             
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Wednesday, December 02, 2009 7:57 AM
                            Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                             

                            My apologies.

                            I think it is safe to say that most children would be bored to tears at most mycological functions, regardless of fungi in the field. Fungal statistics as to when mushrooms were there aren't much help when the rains don't come.

                            I think that one of the problems with getting young folks (twenties and even thirties) to some of these NAMA functions is more about cost....it's expensive to fly across the country and stay in hotels.
                            I think that NAMA should have more regional forays on their docket.
                            Wildacres in NC is always well attended. But even that traditional foray has bad years when it doesn't rain. Same time each year. Last year was great...but that was just the luck of the draw.

                            Debbie

                            --- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com, "Dimitar Bojantchev" <dimitar@... > wrote:
                            >
                            > Ouch, Debbie chill out a bit -- you'll get me into trouble with the NAMA folks. I didn't mean to be harsh and I do not consider myself young either.. All I was saying that good collecting based on statistically highest likelihood of variety is not to be underestimated as the best method to attract children and really young people (5-20 years of age). They would like that better than sitting on a lecture, even if it is fascinating. That's all -- please, do not imply age discrimination in my somewhat "tongue in cheek" comments...
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > D.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: debbieviess
                            > To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                            > Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 1:48 PM
                            > Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > I don't think that any of us can really make these blanket statements about folks in NAMA or "best" foray dates...the weather, our primary cause of great mushrooming and the bad, has been unpredictable at best. My mid-August foray at Crested Butte in 2006(same time as the scheduled NAMA foray in 2010) was some of the best mushrooming of my life! and some of the best for the CO locals, too...
                            >
                            > Tom Volk surely knows when the mushrooms fruit in WI, but his NAMA foray was a fungal bust too...damnable drought was the reason, not lousy date selection. Plus, I suppose, the need for cheap housing on campus over the summer...
                            >
                            > AS to folks not caring if you can get out into the field or not...not so! All of the NAMA field forays that I have been on have been packed with folks, and what's wrong with wanting to hear a lecture by the top mycologists in the field? Just like the majority of most of the club members nationwide, most folks are in it for the edibles...taxonomis ts as a subgroup are waaaaay down in member numbers. Now if I had spent a couple of fruitless days in the field in LA, I might be tempted to sit in on some great lectures, instead of chasing my own tail in the shroomless woods, too.
                            >
                            > But so what? The beauty of mycology is that anyone can find a place in it, for any reason: photography, food, taxonomy, medicine, whathaveyou. Mycologists wear many hats...and WTF is that ageist shit Dimi? Only young people want to do taxonomy and get into the field? Nonsense. Age has nothing to do with it; the demographics are pretty much the same in all mushroom clubs, with foodies taking the lions share of memberships. That's OK by me...somebody has to eat those nasty things! Although sometimes mobility is an issue for much older folks, the downside of not dying young, I guess. On the other hand, look at Larry Stickney...it' s safe to say he''ll be out in the field well into his 80s even if he has to crawl!
                            >
                            > Any date that is picked for a foray is subject to the whims of nature, and that is something that is out of our hands. Still, we must carry on. Mustn't we?
                            >
                            > Debbie Viess
                            >
                            > ps fun collecting in Oakland today...I found a way cool, colorful, slime veiled hygrophorus. ..photos on MO later.
                            >
                            > --- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com, RONALD PASTORINO <ronpast@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Having spent 3 years in NW La. and a few more in CT. and attending several NAMA Forays over the years, I'd say you stand the best chance of getting the maximum number of species and variety by scheduling the event in early to mid Sept in just about any part of the country from the Rockies east to the Atlantic Ocean.
                            > > The central South and Southeast have a little more leeway because of the more temperate climate. But scheduling a foray in even LA. in Late Nov. is very questionable and certainly known by anyone in the area. In that area, one can even get good variety starting in early June. In much of the country east of the Rockies, July and parts of August can be iffy due to prolonged dry weeks.
                            > > In the past NAMA has actually been pretty good about scheduling in peak times for the particular area in which it was being held. But recently, with the proliferation of Mushroom events and Forays, perhaps too many other considerations have entered the decision making process.
                            > > Ron
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > ____________ _________ _________ __
                            > > From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@>
                            > > To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                            > > Sent: Tue, December 1, 2009 8:51:27 AM
                            > > Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA
                            > > foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same
                            > > period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the
                            > > collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere. I looked
                            > > in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the
                            > > presence of good moisture.
                            > >
                            > > And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one
                            > > of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I
                            > > go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region.
                            > > With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people
                            > > draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I
                            > > hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast
                            > > area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit
                            > > now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.
                            > >
                            > > In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of
                            > > other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected,
                            > > but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core
                            > > level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who
                            > > have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime
                            > > interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms
                            > > in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies
                            > > are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors
                            > > attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as
                            > > these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork.
                            > > But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly
                            > > disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go
                            > > in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater
                            > > predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and
                            > > growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and
                            > > the overall organization.
                            > >
                            > > The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO.
                            > > It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not
                            > > the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early
                            > > Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are
                            > > the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about
                            > > the selections they make.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > D.
                            > >
                            > > ----- Original Message -----
                            > > >From: CureCat
                            > > >To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                            > > >Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49
                            > > > AM
                            > > >Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day
                            > > > 2
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events
                            > > > began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not
                            > > > kidding!
                            > > >
                            > > >Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >~CC
                            > > >
                            > > >--- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com,
                            > > > dimitar@ wrote:
                            > > >>
                            > > >> The silver lining of many wonderful
                            > > > mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time
                            > > > to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours
                            > > > with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable
                            > > > insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are
                            > > > trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've
                            > > > had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I
                            > > > walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should
                            > > > tell you enough.
                            > > >>
                            > > >> D.
                            > > >>
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >

                          • B.W. Freyburger
                            Actually as I recall, the time I saw enough mushrooms at that Mississippi welcome center that I could have spent a whole day collecting and IDing them was in
                            Message 13 of 14 , Dec 2, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Actually as I recall, the time I saw enough mushrooms at that Mississippi welcome center that I could have spent a whole day collecting and IDing them was in early October (or maybe very late September) ten years ago, not July.  I would suggest avoiding that whole part of the country in July whether or not there are mushrooms there then.  The amanita you found looks nice but there must have been a hundred or more species on the grounds of that rest area when I was there. 
                              Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:00 PM
                              Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                               

                              

                              Thank you Ron,
                               
                              I think that a better picture is starting to emerge now.
                               
                              Here in a case of comparative collecting -- B.W, Freyburger just wrote to me in a private email about finding a bunch of interesting species some July, years ago, in one of these beautiful Mississippi Welcoming Centers off I-10 that look like an "ante-bellum plantation mansion" [quot]. I looked  extensively at that same location too, there is the NASA Stennis Space Center too.
                               
                               
                              The habitat caught my eye while traveling on the highway with the gorgeous Longleaf Pines  (Pinus palustris) interspersed with some very large Southern Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) trees. All I found was this little Amanita -- I suspect muscaria var. guessowii... This is the best case of comparing notes about a location and clearly show that despite the good moisture content this was way too late in the season.
                               
                               
                              =====
                               
                              Then I decided to quit the mushrooms business entirely and use whatever time I had to do some naval sightseeing in Mobile, AL -- from BB-60 "Alabama" to absolutely the latest stuff -- the Littoral Combat Ship USS "Independence" (LCS-2)
                               
                               
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 12:49 PM
                              Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                               

                               Having spent 3 years in NW La. and a few more in CT. and attending several NAMA Forays over the years, I'd say you stand the best chance of getting the maximum number of species and variety by scheduling the event in early to mid Sept in just about any part of the country from the Rockies east to the Atlantic Ocean.
                                The central South and Southeast have a little more leeway because of the more temperate climate.   But scheduling a foray in even LA. in Late Nov. is very questionable and certainly known by anyone in the area.   In that area, one can even get good variety starting  in early June.  In much of the country east of the Rockies, July and parts of August can be iffy due to prolonged dry weeks.
                                In the past NAMA has actually been pretty good  about scheduling in peak times for the particular area in which it was being held.   But recently, with the proliferation of Mushroom events and Forays, perhaps too many other considerations have entered the decision making process.
                                 Ron


                              From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                              To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                              Sent: Tue, December 1, 2009 8:51:27 AM
                              Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                               

                              As far as the location and dates of this year NAMA foray -- the Gulf States Association traditionally has its foray at the same period, perhaps one week earlier and from other people I have heard that the collecting is like what we saw. Very light compared to elsewhere.  I looked in Alabama and Mississippi as well and I didn't see much at all despite the presence of good moisture.
                               
                              And here is one of my leading frustrations -- one of the key questions to which I find it very hard to find an answer anywhere I go is -- what are the typical fruiting patterns of fungi in a particular region. With very few exceptions (Eddee gave a good one for W. Virginia), most people draw a blank at that question and can't really produce a quick synopsis -- I hear lots of "uhh, ahh, well..." For example I am curious -- in the Gulf Coast area -- do they have one solid Fall flush, or it is pretty much trickle a bit now and then, "lucky to be there" kinda of situation.

                              In general I hear that NAMA has all kinds of other considerations when scheduling an event -- not just what can be collected, but when can the academics take a break, etc. As I said earlier, at some core level, like all other clubs this is a social club with the core of members who have known each other for 30+ years where mycology is far from their prime interest and they couldn't care less if they found 1 mushroom or 100 mushrooms in the field -- they wouldn't know them anyway. At some level these societies are also like a retirement club where they rather spent the time indoors attending the lectures than going out. Nothing wrong with that on one side as these people have the time to organize such events and do all of the footwork. But if I had young people or little children with me they'd be bitterly disappointed of not finding anything as this is the primary reason why they'd go in the woods, or anywhere for that matter. So, the societies that cater predominantly to older folks have to think about their longer term health and growth strategy as well when dealing with locations, collecting prospects and the overall organization.

                              The next year NAMA event in Colorado is about 2-3 weeks too early, IMO. It could be great if the stars align right, but the mid-August is probably not the perfect time and can turn into a total bust if the season is "normal". Early Sep. is far better for variety statistically. At some point I am curious who are the people who organize these events and just how much they have a clue about the selections they make.
                               
                               
                                      D.
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: CureCat
                              Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:49 AM
                              Subject: [MushroomTalk] Re: NAMA Day 2

                               

                              Damn. Noah said he was pissed off about the location before the NAMA events began, because there were "No mushrooms", I guess he was not kidding!

                              Well at least you got to touch on the often neglected issues.

                              ~CC

                              --- In MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com, dimitar@... wrote:
                              >
                              > The silver lining of many wonderful mycologists and so few fresh subjects for study is that we had plenty of time to discuss old collections and general theory -- for example, spent 2 hours with Bart Byuick last night discussing Russula and gained some valuable insights (on that later). Beyond the hospitality (the hosts D and P Lewis are trying very hard and achieving), I will not BS you about the collecting. I've had great days this year, average days, weak days and times (like now) when I walk through a beautiful forest typing messages on a handheld... This should tell you enough.
                              >
                              > D.
                              >

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