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a little help??

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  • terry caudle
    sorry bout the pics, gills didn t come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick,
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 1, 2009
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      sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby
    • Patrick Hamilton
      Terry--does your camera allow you to view the photos just taken or at a later time? If so you could see that they are out of focus. Also, please slice one in
      Message 2 of 19 , Aug 2, 2009
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        Terry--does your camera allow you to view the photos just taken or at a later time?  If so you could see that they are out of focus.  Also, please slice one in two for better possibility of an i.d.
        Regards,
        Patrick


        From: terry caudle <terrycaudle@...>
        To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2009 8:13:23 PM
        Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

         

        sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby

      • terry caudle
        my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won t take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different
        Message 3 of 19 , Aug 2, 2009
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          my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

          --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...> wrote:

          From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
          Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
          To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

           
          Terry,
           
          I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
          etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
          anyone.
           
          When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
          they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
          follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
          but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
          with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
          underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
          check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
           
          Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
          in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
          on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
          trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
          Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
          than 12 miles from the shore break...
           
          California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
          regionally very well established and the collectors should become
          familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
          the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
           
               D.
           
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
          Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

           
          sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby
        • Dimitar Bojantchev
          Stop, freeze, do not move! Terry, it is true that small cameras are hard to focus at the desired spot and they do not allow you to control easily the depth of
          Message 4 of 19 , Aug 2, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Stop, freeze, do not move! Terry, it is true that small cameras are
            hard to focus at the desired spot and they do not allow you to control
            easily the depth of field settings (if you do not understand what I'm
            saying, ignore it for now), but there are ways to make them work if
            you pay attention. Next time you come through the Bay Area give me a
            holler and I can help you set that camera to work for you. The camera
            is not defective, our skills are (usually). You're an enthusiastic
            fellow and we need to encourage such to do their best. Enthusiasm can
            compensate for all else...
             
            Anyway, Ponderosa pine does not sound like it for the Coast either.
            Pay close attention to the count of needles in the bundle and the
            cones. The typical numbers in our area are 2, 3, and 5. In Europe they
            don't know what a 3 needle pine is, but on that later...
             
                D.
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 9:35 PM
            Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

             

            my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

            --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

            From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
            Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
            To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

             
            Terry,
             
            I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
            etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
            anyone.
             
            When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
            they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
            follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
            but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
            with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
            underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
            check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
             
            Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
            in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
            on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
            trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
            Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
            than 12 miles from the shore break...
             
            California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
            regionally very well established and the collectors should become
            familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
            the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
             
                 D.
             
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
            Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

             
            sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby

          • Patrick Hamilton
            Terry--I have an idea--get a tree book. Trees and Shrubs of California is a part of California Natural History Guides (a real good collection!) put out by the
            Message 5 of 19 , Aug 3, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
                Terry--I have an idea--get a tree book.  Trees and Shrubs of California is a part of California Natural History Guides (a real good collection!) put out by the Univ. of CA Press, available most anywhere, is a fine one to buy.  With your apparent enthusiasm about things in the woods it will be good to learn just what makes woods, woods.
                Field guides can be habit forming.  When you get to Pests of Native California Conifers it might be time to stop.  Somebody help me.
              Patrick


              From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
              To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2009 9:57:28 PM
              Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

               

              Stop, freeze, do not move! Terry, it is true that small cameras are
              hard to focus at the desired spot and they do not allow you to control
              easily the depth of field settings (if you do not understand what I'm
              saying, ignore it for now), but there are ways to make them work if
              you pay attention. Next time you come through the Bay Area give me a
              holler and I can help you set that camera to work for you. The camera
              is not defective, our skills are (usually). You're an enthusiastic
              fellow and we need to encourage such to do their best. Enthusiasm can
              compensate for all else...
               
              Anyway, Ponderosa pine does not sound like it for the Coast either.
              Pay close attention to the count of needles in the bundle and the
              cones. The typical numbers in our area are 2, 3, and 5. In Europe they
              don't know what a 3 needle pine is, but on that later...
               
                  D.
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 9:35 PM
              Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

               

              my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

              --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

              From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
              Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
              To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
              Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

               
              Terry,
               
              I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
              etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
              anyone.
               
              When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
              they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
              follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
              but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
              with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
              underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
              check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
               
              Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
              in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
              on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
              trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
              Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
              than 12 miles from the shore break...
               
              California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
              regionally very well established and the collectors should become
              familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
              the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
               
                   D.
               
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
              Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

               
              sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby

            • terry caudle
              bought a book on ebay, trees of sierra nevada, only had about 10 trees in it and only brief description. I ll go get the one you suggest. found more mushrooms
              Message 6 of 19 , Aug 3, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                bought a book on ebay, trees of sierra nevada, only had about 10 trees in it and only brief description. I'll go get the one you suggest.
                found more mushrooms today. still having camera issues. I think it's Agarius abrubtibulbus. Cap looks same shape as augustus. Veiled, stem stains yellow, cap white and gills pink. found in grass under mixed trees, evergreens, redwoods and a couple of other pines.

                --- On Mon, 8/3/09, Patrick Hamilton <mycochef@...> wrote:

                From: Patrick Hamilton <mycochef@...>
                Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 6:59 AM

                 
                  Terry--I have an idea--get a tree book.  Trees and Shrubs of California is a part of California Natural History Guides (a real good collection!) put out by the Univ. of CA Press, available most anywhere, is a fine one to buy.  With your apparent enthusiasm about things in the woods it will be good to learn just what makes woods, woods.
                  Field guides can be habit forming.  When you get to Pests of Native California Conifers it might be time to stop.  Somebody help me.
                Patrick


                From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2009 9:57:28 PM
                Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                 
                Stop, freeze, do not move! Terry, it is true that small cameras are
                hard to focus at the desired spot and they do not allow you to control
                easily the depth of field settings (if you do not understand what I'm
                saying, ignore it for now), but there are ways to make them work if
                you pay attention. Next time you come through the Bay Area give me a
                holler and I can help you set that camera to work for you. The camera
                is not defective, our skills are (usually). You're an enthusiastic
                fellow and we need to encourage such to do their best. Enthusiasm can
                compensate for all else...
                 
                Anyway, Ponderosa pine does not sound like it for the Coast either.
                Pay close attention to the count of needles in the bundle and the
                cones. The typical numbers in our area are 2, 3, and 5. In Europe they
                don't know what a 3 needle pine is, but on that later...
                 
                    D.
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 9:35 PM
                Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                 
                my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                 
                Terry,
                 
                I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                anyone.
                 
                When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                 
                Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                than 12 miles from the shore break...
                 
                California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                 
                     D.
                 
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                 
                sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby
              • Dimitar Bojantchev
                There are several beautiful field guides for Calfiornia. I don t have the time to reference all of them right now, but we should have a standard Orientation
                Message 7 of 19 , Aug 3, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  There are several beautiful field guides for Calfiornia. I don't have
                  the time to reference all of them right now, but we should have a
                  standard "Orientation" page for that. Or I will put something easily
                  accessible that stands out on my site.
                   
                  Two "must have" books:
                   
                  "Conifers of California"
                   
                   
                  "Oaks of Calfironia"
                   
                   
                  Of course, the Internet is loaded with resources -- I utilize them
                  heavily while travelling and cannot have all my books with me.  You
                  can start here -- go to Wikipedia and check the trees of Calfiornia.
                   
                   
                  There is plenty of knowledge accumulation to fill up your time.
                   
                     D.
                   

                  P.S. The Agaricus needs to be seen well all around otherwise it's a 'no go'. Pay attention to bruising reactions (color changes) and odor!! There is something to be said about the notion of Agaricus abruptibulbus Peck and whether it is a real thing or not, but that's a more involved discussion.
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 8:57 AM
                  Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                   

                  bought a book on ebay, trees of sierra nevada, only had about 10 trees in it and only brief description. I'll go get the one you suggest.
                  found more mushrooms today. still having camera issues. I think it's Agarius abrubtibulbus. Cap looks same shape as augustus. Veiled, stem stains yellow, cap white and gills pink. found in grass under mixed trees, evergreens, redwoods and a couple of other pines.

                  --- On Mon, 8/3/09, Patrick Hamilton <mycochef@sbcglobal. net> wrote:

                  From: Patrick Hamilton <mycochef@sbcglobal. net>
                  Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                  To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 6:59 AM

                   
                    Terry--I have an idea--get a tree book.  Trees and Shrubs of California is a part of California Natural History Guides (a real good collection!) put out by the Univ. of CA Press, available most anywhere, is a fine one to buy.  With your apparent enthusiasm about things in the woods it will be good to learn just what makes woods, woods.
                    Field guides can be habit forming.  When you get to Pests of Native California Conifers it might be time to stop.  Somebody help me.
                  Patrick


                  From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                  To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2009 9:57:28 PM
                  Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                   
                  Stop, freeze, do not move! Terry, it is true that small cameras are
                  hard to focus at the desired spot and they do not allow you to control
                  easily the depth of field settings (if you do not understand what I'm
                  saying, ignore it for now), but there are ways to make them work if
                  you pay attention. Next time you come through the Bay Area give me a
                  holler and I can help you set that camera to work for you. The camera
                  is not defective, our skills are (usually). You're an enthusiastic
                  fellow and we need to encourage such to do their best. Enthusiasm can
                  compensate for all else...
                   
                  Anyway, Ponderosa pine does not sound like it for the Coast either.
                  Pay close attention to the count of needles in the bundle and the
                  cones. The typical numbers in our area are 2, 3, and 5. In Europe they
                  don't know what a 3 needle pine is, but on that later...
                   
                      D.
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 9:35 PM
                  Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                   
                  my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                  --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                  From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                  Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                  To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                   
                  Terry,
                   
                  I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                  etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                  anyone.
                   
                  When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                  they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                  follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                  but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                  with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                  underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                  check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                   
                  Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                  in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                  on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                  trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                  Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                  than 12 miles from the shore break...
                   
                  California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                  regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                  familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                  the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                   
                       D.
                   
                   
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                  Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                   
                  sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby

                • debbie viess
                  I also like the Peterson Field Guide to Western Trees by Petrides and Petrides. Nice illustrations of leaves and needles, fruit and cones etc., and plenty of
                  Message 8 of 19 , Aug 3, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I also like the Peterson Field Guide to Western Trees by Petrides and Petrides. Nice illustrations of leaves and needles, fruit and cones etc., and plenty of text, too.
                    Debbie
                    --- On Mon, 8/3/09, terry caudle <terrycaudle@...> wrote:

                    From: terry caudle <terrycaudle@...>
                    Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                    To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 3:57 PM

                     
                    bought a book on ebay, trees of sierra nevada, only had about 10 trees in it and only brief description. I'll go get the one you suggest.
                    found more mushrooms today. still having camera issues. I think it's Agarius abrubtibulbus. Cap looks same shape as augustus. Veiled, stem stains yellow, cap white and gills pink. found in grass under mixed trees, evergreens, redwoods and a couple of other pines.

                    --- On Mon, 8/3/09, Patrick Hamilton <mycochef@sbcglobal. net> wrote:

                    From: Patrick Hamilton <mycochef@sbcglobal. net>
                    Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                    To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                    Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 6:59 AM

                     
                      Terry--I have an idea--get a tree book.  Trees and Shrubs of California is a part of California Natural History Guides (a real good collection!) put out by the Univ. of CA Press, available most anywhere, is a fine one to buy.  With your apparent enthusiasm about things in the woods it will be good to learn just what makes woods, woods.
                      Field guides can be habit forming.  When you get to Pests of Native California Conifers it might be time to stop.  Somebody help me.
                    Patrick


                    From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                    To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                    Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2009 9:57:28 PM
                    Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                     
                    Stop, freeze, do not move! Terry, it is true that small cameras are
                    hard to focus at the desired spot and they do not allow you to control
                    easily the depth of field settings (if you do not understand what I'm
                    saying, ignore it for now), but there are ways to make them work if
                    you pay attention. Next time you come through the Bay Area give me a
                    holler and I can help you set that camera to work for you. The camera
                    is not defective, our skills are (usually). You're an enthusiastic
                    fellow and we need to encourage such to do their best. Enthusiasm can
                    compensate for all else...
                     
                    Anyway, Ponderosa pine does not sound like it for the Coast either.
                    Pay close attention to the count of needles in the bundle and the
                    cones. The typical numbers in our area are 2, 3, and 5. In Europe they
                    don't know what a 3 needle pine is, but on that later...
                     
                        D.
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 9:35 PM
                    Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                     
                    my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                    --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                    From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                    Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                    To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                    Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                     
                    Terry,
                     
                    I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                    etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                    anyone.
                     
                    When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                    they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                    follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                    but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                    with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                    underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                    check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                     
                    Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                    in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                    on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                    trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                    Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                    than 12 miles from the shore break...
                     
                    California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                    regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                    familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                    the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                     
                         D.
                     
                     
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                    Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                     
                    sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby
                  • terry caudle
                    thanks guys, incoming pics ... From: debbie viess Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                    Message 9 of 19 , Aug 3, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      thanks guys, incoming pics

                      --- On Mon, 8/3/09, debbie viess <amanitarita@...> wrote:

                      From: debbie viess <amanitarita@...>
                      Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                      To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 9:56 AM

                       
                      I also like the Peterson Field Guide to Western Trees by Petrides and Petrides. Nice illustrations of leaves and needles, fruit and cones etc., and plenty of text, too.
                      Debbie
                      --- On Mon, 8/3/09, terry caudle <terrycaudle@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:

                      From: terry caudle <terrycaudle@ sbcglobal. net>
                      Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                      To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                      Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 3:57 PM

                       
                      bought a book on ebay, trees of sierra nevada, only had about 10 trees in it and only brief description. I'll go get the one you suggest.
                      found more mushrooms today. still having camera issues. I think it's Agarius abrubtibulbus. Cap looks same shape as augustus. Veiled, stem stains yellow, cap white and gills pink. found in grass under mixed trees, evergreens, redwoods and a couple of other pines.

                      --- On Mon, 8/3/09, Patrick Hamilton <mycochef@sbcglobal. net> wrote:

                      From: Patrick Hamilton <mycochef@sbcglobal. net>
                      Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                      To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                      Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 6:59 AM

                       
                        Terry--I have an idea--get a tree book.  Trees and Shrubs of California is a part of California Natural History Guides (a real good collection!) put out by the Univ. of CA Press, available most anywhere, is a fine one to buy.  With your apparent enthusiasm about things in the woods it will be good to learn just what makes woods, woods.
                        Field guides can be habit forming.  When you get to Pests of Native California Conifers it might be time to stop.  Somebody help me.
                      Patrick


                      From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                      To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                      Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2009 9:57:28 PM
                      Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                       
                      Stop, freeze, do not move! Terry, it is true that small cameras are
                      hard to focus at the desired spot and they do not allow you to control
                      easily the depth of field settings (if you do not understand what I'm
                      saying, ignore it for now), but there are ways to make them work if
                      you pay attention. Next time you come through the Bay Area give me a
                      holler and I can help you set that camera to work for you. The camera
                      is not defective, our skills are (usually). You're an enthusiastic
                      fellow and we need to encourage such to do their best. Enthusiasm can
                      compensate for all else...
                       
                      Anyway, Ponderosa pine does not sound like it for the Coast either.
                      Pay close attention to the count of needles in the bundle and the
                      cones. The typical numbers in our area are 2, 3, and 5. In Europe they
                      don't know what a 3 needle pine is, but on that later...
                       
                          D.
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 9:35 PM
                      Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                       
                      my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                      --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                      From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                      Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                      To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                      Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                       
                      Terry,
                       
                      I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                      etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                      anyone.
                       
                      When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                      they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                      follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                      but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                      with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                      underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                      check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                       
                      Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                      in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                      on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                      trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                      Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                      than 12 miles from the shore break...
                       
                      California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                      regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                      familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                      the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                       
                           D.
                       
                       
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                      Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                       
                      sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby
                    • Patrick Hamilton
                      I think we re going to have Lanner (Conifers. . .) at Camp. ________________________________ From: Dimitar Bojantchev To:
                      Message 10 of 19 , Aug 3, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I think we're going to have Lanner (Conifers. . .) at Camp.


                        From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
                        To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Monday, August 3, 2009 9:25:51 AM
                        Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                         

                        There are several beautiful field guides for Calfiornia. I don't have
                        the time to reference all of them right now, but we should have a
                        standard "Orientation" page for that. Or I will put something easily
                        accessible that stands out on my site.
                         
                        Two "must have" books:
                         
                        "Conifers of California"
                         
                         
                        "Oaks of Calfironia"
                         
                         
                        Of course, the Internet is loaded with resources -- I utilize them
                        heavily while travelling and cannot have all my books with me.  You
                        can start here -- go to Wikipedia and check the trees of Calfiornia.
                         
                         
                        There is plenty of knowledge accumulation to fill up your time.
                         
                           D.
                         

                        P.S. The Agaricus needs to be seen well all around otherwise it's a 'no go'. Pay attention to bruising reactions (color changes) and odor!! There is something to be said about the notion of Agaricus abruptibulbus Peck and whether it is a real thing or not, but that's a more involved discussion.
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 8:57 AM
                        Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                         

                        bought a book on ebay, trees of sierra nevada, only had about 10 trees in it and only brief description. I'll go get the one you suggest.
                        found more mushrooms today. still having camera issues. I think it's Agarius abrubtibulbus. Cap looks same shape as augustus. Veiled, stem stains yellow, cap white and gills pink. found in grass under mixed trees, evergreens, redwoods and a couple of other pines.

                        --- On Mon, 8/3/09, Patrick Hamilton <mycochef@sbcglobal. net> wrote:

                        From: Patrick Hamilton <mycochef@sbcglobal. net>
                        Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                        To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                        Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 6:59 AM

                         
                          Terry--I have an idea--get a tree book.  Trees and Shrubs of California is a part of California Natural History Guides (a real good collection!) put out by the Univ. of CA Press, available most anywhere, is a fine one to buy.  With your apparent enthusiasm about things in the woods it will be good to learn just what makes woods, woods.
                          Field guides can be habit forming.  When you get to Pests of Native California Conifers it might be time to stop.  Somebody help me.
                        Patrick


                        From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                        To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                        Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2009 9:57:28 PM
                        Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                         
                        Stop, freeze, do not move! Terry, it is true that small cameras are
                        hard to focus at the desired spot and they do not allow you to control
                        easily the depth of field settings (if you do not understand what I'm
                        saying, ignore it for now), but there are ways to make them work if
                        you pay attention. Next time you come through the Bay Area give me a
                        holler and I can help you set that camera to work for you. The camera
                        is not defective, our skills are (usually). You're an enthusiastic
                        fellow and we need to encourage such to do their best. Enthusiasm can
                        compensate for all else...
                         
                        Anyway, Ponderosa pine does not sound like it for the Coast either.
                        Pay close attention to the count of needles in the bundle and the
                        cones. The typical numbers in our area are 2, 3, and 5. In Europe they
                        don't know what a 3 needle pine is, but on that later...
                         
                            D.
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 9:35 PM
                        Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                         
                        my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                        --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                        From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                        Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                        To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                        Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                         
                        Terry,
                         
                        I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                        etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                        anyone.
                         
                        When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                        they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                        follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                        but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                        with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                        underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                        check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                         
                        Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                        in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                        on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                        trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                        Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                        than 12 miles from the shore break...
                         
                        California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                        regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                        familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                        the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                         
                             D.
                         
                         
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                        Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                         
                        sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby

                      • J H
                        if it has a macro setting learn to use it and youll be fine... i use a ziplock bag of rice as a tripod...you can set it on anything and it steadies the camera.
                        Message 11 of 19 , Aug 3, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          if it has a macro setting learn to use it and youll be fine...
                           
                          i use a ziplock bag of rice as a tripod...you can set it on anything and it steadies the camera. after you get used to the macro function, learn to set a timer for snapping the photo. in macro mode even the act of hitting the button to shoot can move the camera enough to cause the picture to be out of focus or appear in motion.
                           
                          good luck!
                           
                          Greys
                           

                          To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                          From: terrycaudle@...
                          Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2009 21:35:11 -0700
                          Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                           
                          my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                          --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                          From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                          Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                          To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                          Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                           
                          Terry,
                           
                          I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                          etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                          anyone.
                           
                          When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                          they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                          follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                          but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                          with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                          underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                          check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                           
                          Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                          in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                          on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                          trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                          Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                          than 12 miles from the shore break...
                           
                          California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                          regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                          familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                          the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                           
                               D.
                           
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                          Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                           
                          sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby



                          Get back to school stuff for them and cashback for you. Try BingT now.
                        • terry caudle
                          I bought a Canon powershot A530 through ebay. It has all kinds of functions but I have no idea how to use it. When I power on I can see the target in the
                          Message 12 of 19 , Aug 3, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I bought a Canon powershot A530 through ebay. It has all kinds of functions but I have no idea how to use it. When I power on I can see the target in the screen but when I snap the shot it never freezes the frame or flashes. I seems to be stuck on trying to take a movie. I bought it used and didn't get a manual with it. Tried to download the info on it but the print was so small and of poor quality I couldn't read it. My back up is a kodac easy share with no zoom, no way to magnify. It works but the resalution sucks. I'm not working so I can't throw down for a new camera right now.

                            --- On Mon, 8/3/09, J H <greysRDbest@...> wrote:

                            From: J H <greysRDbest@...>
                            Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                            To: mushroomtalk@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 5:18 PM

                             
                            if it has a macro setting learn to use it and youll be fine...
                             
                            i use a ziplock bag of rice as a tripod...you can set it on anything and it steadies the camera. after you get used to the macro function, learn to set a timer for snapping the photo. in macro mode even the act of hitting the button to shoot can move the camera enough to cause the picture to be out of focus or appear in motion.
                             
                            good luck!
                             
                            Greys
                             

                            To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                            From: terrycaudle@ sbcglobal. net
                            Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2009 21:35:11 -0700
                            Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                             
                            my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                            --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                            From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                            Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                            To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                            Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                             
                            Terry,
                             
                            I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                            etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                            anyone.
                             
                            When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                            they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                            follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                            but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                            with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                            underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                            check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                             
                            Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                            in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                            on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                            trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                            Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                            than 12 miles from the shore break...
                             
                            California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                            regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                            familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                            the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                             
                                 D.
                             
                             
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                            Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                             
                            sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby



                            Get back to school stuff for them and cashback for you. Try BingT now.
                          • Dimitar Bojantchev
                            Terry, here is the manual, you can zoom on a PDF all you want +/-.. http://its.lafayette.edu/downloads/pdfs/manuals/CanonPowerShotA530Manual.pdf This camera
                            Message 13 of 19 , Aug 3, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Terry,
                               
                              here is the manual, you can zoom on a PDF all you want +/-..
                               
                               
                              This camera should allow you to make pretty good photos. Learn the features, the basic concepts are not hard to grasp.
                               
                              ------------
                               
                              Greys, I carry a tripod ALL THE TIME since Nov 2007. I have to use a remote control to shoot the camera and be very steady on my feet even 5 feet away as the duff can transfer movement if I am fidgety. To get depth of field I use F16 all the time and get long exposure times even at ISO400. No superhuman can hold a camera that long without trembling. The bags of rice may be Ok, but do not allow you the flexibility of angle when shooting the subject. The good side of carrying a tripod is that it is also an excellent defensive weapon against potential attackers. The downside is that I have scared two horses so far...  one almost threw off the lady rider off down the hill, while I had to jump up the hill like a goat to escape a potential challenge by the young stallion... on a trail in the Oakland hills.
                               
                                      D.
                                      www.mushroomhobby.com
                               
                               
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 5:54 PM
                              Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                               

                              I bought a Canon powershot A530 through ebay. It has all kinds of functions but I have no idea how to use it. When I power on I can see the target in the screen but when I snap the shot it never freezes the frame or flashes. I seems to be stuck on trying to take a movie. I bought it used and didn't get a manual with it. Tried to download the info on it but the print was so small and of poor quality I couldn't read it. My back up is a kodac easy share with no zoom, no way to magnify. It works but the resalution sucks. I'm not working so I can't throw down for a new camera right now.

                              --- On Mon, 8/3/09, J H <greysRDbest@ hotmail.com> wrote:

                              From: J H <greysRDbest@ hotmail.com>
                              Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                              To: mushroomtalk@ yahoogroups. com
                              Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 5:18 PM

                               
                              if it has a macro setting learn to use it and youll be fine...
                               
                              i use a ziplock bag of rice as a tripod...you can set it on anything and it steadies the camera. after you get used to the macro function, learn to set a timer for snapping the photo. in macro mode even the act of hitting the button to shoot can move the camera enough to cause the picture to be out of focus or appear in motion.
                               
                              good luck!
                               
                              Greys
                               

                              To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                              From: terrycaudle@ sbcglobal. net
                              Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2009 21:35:11 -0700
                              Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                               
                              my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                              --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                              From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                              Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                              To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                              Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                               
                              Terry,
                               
                              I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                              etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                              anyone.
                               
                              When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                              they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                              follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                              but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                              with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                              underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                              check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                               
                              Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                              in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                              on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                              trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                              Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                              than 12 miles from the shore break...
                               
                              California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                              regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                              familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                              the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                               
                                   D.
                               
                               
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                              Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                               
                              sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby



                              Get back to school stuff for them and cashback for you. Try BingT now.

                            • terry caudle
                              My biggest problem right now is I can t get it to take a picture. I push the button and nothing happens. No flash and the target doesn t freeze. ... From:
                              Message 14 of 19 , Aug 3, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                My biggest problem right now is I can't get it to take a picture. I push the button and nothing happens. No flash and the target doesn't freeze.

                                --- On Mon, 8/3/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...> wrote:

                                From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...>
                                Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                                To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 11:21 PM

                                 
                                Terry,
                                 
                                here is the manual, you can zoom on a PDF all you want +/-..
                                 
                                 
                                This camera should allow you to make pretty good photos. Learn the features, the basic concepts are not hard to grasp.
                                 
                                ------------
                                 
                                Greys, I carry a tripod ALL THE TIME since Nov 2007. I have to use a remote control to shoot the camera and be very steady on my feet even 5 feet away as the duff can transfer movement if I am fidgety. To get depth of field I use F16 all the time and get long exposure times even at ISO400. No superhuman can hold a camera that long without trembling. The bags of rice may be Ok, but do not allow you the flexibility of angle when shooting the subject. The good side of carrying a tripod is that it is also an excellent defensive weapon against potential attackers. The downside is that I have scared two horses so far...  one almost threw off the lady rider off down the hill, while I had to jump up the hill like a goat to escape a potential challenge by the young stallion... on a trail in the Oakland hills.
                                 
                                        D.
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 5:54 PM
                                Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                                 
                                I bought a Canon powershot A530 through ebay. It has all kinds of functions but I have no idea how to use it. When I power on I can see the target in the screen but when I snap the shot it never freezes the frame or flashes. I seems to be stuck on trying to take a movie. I bought it used and didn't get a manual with it. Tried to download the info on it but the print was so small and of poor quality I couldn't read it. My back up is a kodac easy share with no zoom, no way to magnify. It works but the resalution sucks. I'm not working so I can't throw down for a new camera right now.

                                --- On Mon, 8/3/09, J H <greysRDbest@ hotmail.com> wrote:

                                From: J H <greysRDbest@ hotmail.com>
                                Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                                To: mushroomtalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 5:18 PM

                                 
                                if it has a macro setting learn to use it and youll be fine...
                                 
                                i use a ziplock bag of rice as a tripod...you can set it on anything and it steadies the camera. after you get used to the macro function, learn to set a timer for snapping the photo. in macro mode even the act of hitting the button to shoot can move the camera enough to cause the picture to be out of focus or appear in motion.
                                 
                                good luck!
                                 
                                Greys
                                 

                                To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                From: terrycaudle@ sbcglobal. net
                                Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2009 21:35:11 -0700
                                Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                                 
                                my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                                --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                                From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                                Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                                To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                                 
                                Terry,
                                 
                                I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                                etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                                anyone.
                                 
                                When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                                they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                                follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                                but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                                with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                                underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                                check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                                 
                                Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                                in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                                on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                                trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                                Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                                than 12 miles from the shore break...
                                 
                                California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                                regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                                familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                                the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                                 
                                     D.
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                                Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                                 
                                sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby



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                              • J H
                                Dimitar- many of the places i go preclude a tripod. In fact sometimes i choose between the camera and the gps- and the gps wins much of the time. i get good
                                Message 15 of 19 , Aug 4, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Dimitar- many of the places i go preclude a tripod. In fact sometimes i choose between the camera and the gps- and the gps wins much of the time.
                                   
                                  i get good quality photos from a pretty run of the mill point and shoot camera( canon a630 runs about 225 dollars), and im by no means a photography expert.
                                   
                                  all the attached photos were taken with a bag of rice.
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                  Jason Hauser
                                   
                                  aka Greys
                                   
                                   

                                   

                                  To: MushroomTalk@yahoogroups.com
                                  From: dimitar@...
                                  Date: Mon, 3 Aug 2009 23:21:59 -0700
                                  Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                                   
                                  Terry,
                                   
                                  here is the manual, you can zoom on a PDF all you want +/-..
                                   
                                   
                                  This camera should allow you to make pretty good photos. Learn the features, the basic concepts are not hard to grasp.
                                   
                                  ------------
                                   
                                  Greys, I carry a tripod ALL THE TIME since Nov 2007. I have to use a remote control to shoot the camera and be very steady on my feet even 5 feet away as the duff can transfer movement if I am fidgety. To get depth of field I use F16 all the time and get long exposure times even at ISO400. No superhuman can hold a camera that long without trembling. The bags of rice may be Ok, but do not allow you the flexibility of angle when shooting the subject. The good side of carrying a tripod is that it is also an excellent defensive weapon against potential attackers. The downside is that I have scared two horses so far...  one almost threw off the lady rider off down the hill, while I had to jump up the hill like a goat to escape a potential challenge by the young stallion... on a trail in the Oakland hills.
                                   
                                          D.
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 5:54 PM
                                  Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                                   

                                  I bought a Canon powershot A530 through ebay. It has all kinds of functions but I have no idea how to use it. When I power on I can see the target in the screen but when I snap the shot it never freezes the frame or flashes. I seems to be stuck on trying to take a movie. I bought it used and didn't get a manual with it. Tried to download the info on it but the print was so small and of poor quality I couldn't read it. My back up is a kodac easy share with no zoom, no way to magnify. It works but the resalution sucks. I'm not working so I can't throw down for a new camera right now.

                                  --- On Mon, 8/3/09, J H <greysRDbest@ hotmail.com> wrote:

                                  From: J H <greysRDbest@ hotmail.com>
                                  Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                                  To: mushroomtalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 5:18 PM

                                   
                                  if it has a macro setting learn to use it and youll be fine...
                                   
                                  i use a ziplock bag of rice as a tripod...you can set it on anything and it steadies the camera. after you get used to the macro function, learn to set a timer for snapping the photo. in macro mode even the act of hitting the button to shoot can move the camera enough to cause the picture to be out of focus or appear in motion.
                                   
                                  good luck!
                                   
                                  Greys
                                   

                                  To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                  From: terrycaudle@ sbcglobal. net
                                  Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2009 21:35:11 -0700
                                  Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                                   
                                  my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                                  --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                                  From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                                  Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                                  To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                                   
                                  Terry,
                                   
                                  I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                                  etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                                  anyone.
                                   
                                  When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                                  they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                                  follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                                  but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                                  with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                                  underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                                  check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                                   
                                  Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                                  in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                                  on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                                  trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                                  Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                                  than 12 miles from the shore break...
                                   
                                  California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                                  regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                                  familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                                  the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                                   
                                       D.
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                                  Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                                   
                                  sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby



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                                • terry caudle
                                  Okay, I m stupid!!! bought some new batteries and the camera s working now. Still have a learning process I ll be going through but no more bogus pics. ...
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Aug 4, 2009
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Okay, I'm stupid!!! bought some new batteries and the camera's working now. Still have a learning process I'll be going through but no more bogus pics.

                                    --- On Tue, 8/4/09, J H <greysRDbest@...> wrote:

                                    From: J H <greysRDbest@...>
                                    Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                                    To: mushroomtalk@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Tuesday, August 4, 2009, 6:54 PM

                                     
                                    just a quick web search of support forums indicated the 530 is a battery hog. try fresh batteries... and try some support forums.
                                    i hate to say it, if you bought it used then it might have been "pre ruined" by the previous user.
                                    wish i could be of more help but im not familiar with that model.
                                     
                                    good luck
                                     
                                    Jason Hauser
                                    aka greys
                                     

                                    To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                    From: terrycaudle@ sbcglobal. net
                                    Date: Tue, 4 Aug 2009 18:00:35 -0700
                                    Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                                     
                                    my a530 would take a great picture, if I could take one. What's in the screen looks clear and sharp. I just can't snap a shot?? Flash doesn't flash and picture doesn't freeze when I shoot. When I push the button it shoots out an amber light, not a bright flash. Could it be something stupid like a low battery??

                                    --- On Tue, 8/4/09, J H <greysRDbest@ hotmail.com> wrote:

                                    From: J H <greysRDbest@ hotmail.com>
                                    Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [6 Attachments]
                                    To: mushroomtalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                    Date: Tuesday, August 4, 2009, 4:04 PM

                                     
                                    Dimitar- many of the places i go preclude a tripod. In fact sometimes i choose between the camera and the gps- and the gps wins much of the time.
                                     
                                    i get good quality photos from a pretty run of the mill point and shoot camera( canon a630 runs about 225 dollars), and im by no means a photography expert.
                                     
                                    all the attached photos were taken with a bag of rice.
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                    Jason Hauser
                                     
                                    aka Greys
                                     
                                     

                                     

                                    To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                    From: dimitar@pontix. com
                                    Date: Mon, 3 Aug 2009 23:21:59 -0700
                                    Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                                     
                                    Terry,
                                     
                                    here is the manual, you can zoom on a PDF all you want +/-..
                                     
                                     
                                    This camera should allow you to make pretty good photos. Learn the features, the basic concepts are not hard to grasp.
                                     
                                    ------------
                                     
                                    Greys, I carry a tripod ALL THE TIME since Nov 2007. I have to use a remote control to shoot the camera and be very steady on my feet even 5 feet away as the duff can transfer movement if I am fidgety. To get depth of field I use F16 all the time and get long exposure times even at ISO400. No superhuman can hold a camera that long without trembling. The bags of rice may be Ok, but do not allow you the flexibility of angle when shooting the subject. The good side of carrying a tripod is that it is also an excellent defensive weapon against potential attackers. The downside is that I have scared two horses so far...  one almost threw off the lady rider off down the hill, while I had to jump up the hill like a goat to escape a potential challenge by the young stallion... on a trail in the Oakland hills.
                                     
                                            D.
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 5:54 PM
                                    Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                                     
                                    I bought a Canon powershot A530 through ebay. It has all kinds of functions but I have no idea how to use it. When I power on I can see the target in the screen but when I snap the shot it never freezes the frame or flashes. I seems to be stuck on trying to take a movie. I bought it used and didn't get a manual with it. Tried to download the info on it but the print was so small and of poor quality I couldn't read it. My back up is a kodac easy share with no zoom, no way to magnify. It works but the resalution sucks. I'm not working so I can't throw down for a new camera right now.

                                    --- On Mon, 8/3/09, J H <greysRDbest@ hotmail.com> wrote:

                                    From: J H <greysRDbest@ hotmail.com>
                                    Subject: RE: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                                    To: mushroomtalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                    Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 5:18 PM

                                     
                                    if it has a macro setting learn to use it and youll be fine...
                                     
                                    i use a ziplock bag of rice as a tripod...you can set it on anything and it steadies the camera. after you get used to the macro function, learn to set a timer for snapping the photo. in macro mode even the act of hitting the button to shoot can move the camera enough to cause the picture to be out of focus or appear in motion.
                                     
                                    good luck!
                                     
                                    Greys
                                     

                                    To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                    From: terrycaudle@ sbcglobal. net
                                    Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2009 21:35:11 -0700
                                    Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??

                                     
                                    my bad, pine may be a ponderosa, long needles on it. Funky camera won't take a better picture, kodac easy share with no zoom, tried several different angles and distances but it didn't help. Bought a camera on ebay but it's defective. I'll have new photos out this week.

                                    --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com> wrote:

                                    From: Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@pontix. com>
                                    Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help??
                                    To: MushroomTalk@ yahoogroups. com
                                    Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 5:32 AM

                                     
                                    Terry,
                                     
                                    I suspect this is some kind of a Polypore -- Albatrellus, Jahnoporus,
                                    etc... Darvin DeShazer knows that group from SPSP probably better than
                                    anyone.
                                     
                                    When people are presented with a difficult specimen and a bad photo
                                    they tend to channel their frustration at the photo. We will not
                                    follow that path here and admit straight to not knowing the answer,
                                    but I still believe that we deserve a better photo to try to proceed
                                    with identification. It is critically important to be able to see the
                                    underside with good detail when identifying Polypores. You should
                                    check your photos in the field and make corrections while you can.
                                     
                                    Also, somebody correct me, but I have not seen or heard of Sugar Pine
                                    in the SPSP area. Terry, Sugar Pine is the tree with the longest cones
                                    on Earth and is typical for the Sierra Nevada. Pay attention to the
                                    trees. The Calfiornia Coast has a very unique species called Bishop
                                    Pine that usually grows within eyesight of the Pacific, never deeper
                                    than 12 miles from the shore break...
                                     
                                    California is amazingly rich of Pine species. Half of them are
                                    regionally very well established and the collectors should become
                                    familiar with them. The other half particularly those 4-5 ones from
                                    the High Sierras are more rare and harder to learn.
                                     
                                         D.
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 8:13 PM
                                    Subject: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? [3 Attachments]

                                     
                                    sorry 'bout the pics, gills didn't come out for some reason. Interesting mushroom. Found at the base of a sugar pine near Salt Point yesterday. Stem was thick, for the size of mushroom, and kind of crumbly like feta cheese. Mushroom is very firm and fresh. Started out quite a bit lighter, darkening after being handled. Short-stalked White Russulas plentiful nearby



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                                    Express your personality in color! Preview and select themes for Hotmail®. Try it now.



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                                  • debbie viess
                                    I don t have a lot to add to this photography discussion, other than this: if you own a small digital camera (I used to have a Nikon coolpix) there is a tiny,
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Aug 6, 2009
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      I don't have a lot to add to this photography discussion, other than this: if you own a small digital camera (I used to have a Nikon coolpix) there is a tiny, pocket-sized tripod called a Promaster that might work for you. It's cheap and portable, and works very, very well for those macroshots.
                                       
                                      It won't work for larger cameras tho, alas, which brings us back to the dilemma of having to lug around bulky and weighty gear. And like many of us, I am already not traveling very lightly! Here's one sad example, from a trip to Colorado during the 2006 bolete season...
                                       
                                      Debbie
                                    • Tom Cruckshank
                                      Being on the downside of 60 I always carry a walking stick when hunting. I do not think it would be too much of a stretch to convert it to a monopod, or
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Aug 6, 2009
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        Being on the downside of 60 I always carry a walking stick when hunting.  I do not think it would be too much of a stretch to convert it to a monopod, or purchase one already made with this combo in mind.  A tripod is a hassle, but a monopod works great, especially if braced against a solid object like a tree.  I have a monopod that I made from a painter's extension pole; crutch tip on the bottom, and adapted a nice swivel, quick release camera mount to the top.  I used it for making videos of volleyball where I could extend it to 10 feet to get above the hoi polloi.  Using a shorter one might be just right for a monopod/walking stick.

                                        tc

                                        p.s. a google search found plenty from $20 to $250 plus:
                                        http://lonelyplanet.altrec.com/shop/detail/35482/
                                        http://tinyurl.com/n7njar
                                        http://tinyurl.com/me245u
                                        http://www.bioneural.net/2004/04/23/a-monopod-and-trekking-pole-in-one/
                                        or make one from a stick:
                                        http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/photography/articles/36271.aspx
                                        http://www.metacafe.com/watch/2530976/diy_camera_monopod_walking_stick_under_15_dslr/


                                        debbie viess wrote:
                                        <*>[Attachment(s) from debbie viess included below]
                                        
                                        I don't have a lot to add to this photography discussion, other than this: if you own a small digital camera (I used to have a Nikon coolpix) there is a tiny, pocket-sized tripod called a Promaster that might work for you. It's cheap and portable, and works very, very well for those macroshots. 
                                         
                                        It won't work for larger cameras tho, alas, which brings us back to the dilemma of having to lug around bulky and weighty gear. And like many of us, I am already not traveling very lightly! Here's one sad example, from a trip to Colorado during the 2006 bolete season...
                                         
                                        Debbie
                                        
                                        
                                          
                                      • Dimitar Bojantchev
                                        In my basic view there are two basic modes of shooting mushrooms in the typical low light conditions inside forests: 1) Manually held camera when shooting with
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Aug 6, 2009
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          In my basic view there are two basic modes of shooting mushrooms in
                                          the typical low light conditions inside forests:
                                           
                                          1) Manually held camera when shooting with shutter speeds at 1/60-th
                                          of a sec. or faster.
                                           
                                          2) Full blown tripod with a non-physical contact shutter release
                                          (remote control or a timer) if the shutter speeds are below 1/60-th
                                          sec.
                                           
                                          Most handheld small cameras shoot in mode 1 as they typically use low
                                          F numbers (= faster speed) and shallow depth of field. SLR's can do
                                          the same or compensate for high F numbers with tons of flash.
                                           
                                          Slow speed shooting requires (2).
                                           
                                          A monopod will reduce the vibration, no doubt, but not as much as to
                                          allow mode 2 completely.
                                           
                                          Yet, one time when I really needed a tall monopod
                                          (a very rare circumstance) is when shooting this Volvariella bombycina
                                           
                                           
                                          in a dark wet forest in Southern Illinois and she was 10-12 feet high
                                          on the tree. I had to extend my hands as far as possible yet maintain
                                          some kind of balance. This is one time when I should have sacrificed
                                          depth of field for faster speeds because all photos came somewhat
                                          fuzzy...
                                           
                                          Tom, you look 42-43 years of age to me.
                                           
                                           D.
                                           

                                           
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          Sent: Thursday, August 06, 2009 8:07 PM
                                          Subject: Re: [MushroomTalk] a little help?? Monopod?

                                           

                                          Being on the downside of 60 I always carry a walking stick when hunting.  I do not think it would be too much of a stretch to convert it to a monopod, or purchase one already made with this combo in mind.  A tripod is a hassle, but a monopod works great, especially if braced against a solid object like a tree.  I have a monopod that I made from a painter's extension pole; crutch tip on the bottom, and adapted a nice swivel, quick release camera mount to the top.  I used it for making videos of volleyball where I could extend it to 10 feet to get above the hoi polloi.  Using a shorter one might be just right for a monopod/walking stick.

                                          tc

                                          p.s. a google search found plenty from $20 to $250 plus:
                                          http://lonelyplanet .altrec.com/ shop/detail/ 35482/
                                          http://tinyurl. com/n7njar
                                          http://tinyurl. com/me245u
                                          http://www.bioneura l.net/2004/ 04/23/a-monopod- and-trekking- pole-in-one/
                                          or make one from a stick:
                                          http://www.brighthu b.com/multimedia /photography/ articles/ 36271.aspx
                                          http://www.metacafe .com/watch/ 2530976/diy_ camera_monopod_ walking_stick_ under_15_ dslr/


                                          debbie viess wrote:

                                          <*>[Attachment( s) from debbie viess included below]
                                          
                                          I don't have a lot to add to this photography discussion, other than this: if you own a small digital camera (I used to have a Nikon coolpix) there is a tiny, pocket-sized tripod called a Promaster that might work for you. It's cheap and portable, and works very, very well for those macroshots. 
                                           
                                          It won't work for larger cameras tho, alas, which brings us back to the dilemma of having to lug around bulky and weighty gear. And like many of us, I am already not traveling very lightly! Here's one sad example, from a trip to Colorado during the 2006 bolete season...
                                           
                                          Debbie
                                          
                                          
                                            

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