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Very Nice Photos

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  • cfs_myko
    Go to Flickr, search for the page by Jacqueline+ , she has some very nice work on mushrooms apparently of Quebec. All in French, alas.
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 1, 2009
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      Go to Flickr, search for the page by "Jacqueline+", she has some very nice work on mushrooms apparently of Quebec. All in French, alas.
    • Dimitar Bojantchev
      I know of that person. Never met her, but she has great work indeed. The ids are less convincing, but the imagery is superb. It s nice to have something to
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 2, 2009
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        I know of that person. Never met her, but she has great work
        indeed. The ids are less convincing, but the imagery is superb. It's
        nice to have something to point out as far as usefulness and beauty
        and presentation is concerned.
         
        Quebec has a strong school of amateur mycologists, some of whom I met
        last year during NEMF 2008.
         

        There was another amazing Italian site where they had some artistic
        micro photos of Ascomycetes -- I think they used a microtome for their
        work actually.
         
        Christian, how do you get that chiseled look in your micro photos?
         
         
        Is that on purpose? Done via the software only? I had a similar effect
        with a slide that went dry, or got contaminated with immersion
        oil. Share the secret.
         
        Have fun,
         
            D.
         
        P.S. In general you will notice that Southern European Cultures tend
        to be a lot more "expressive" in their imagery. That translates into
        mycology too. Compare to the rather ascetic works of the Northern
        European mycologists. When the French or Italians put out a
        monographic flora, you know that it will be a display table stuff.
         
        Quite to the contrary, North American Cortinariology has been the
        worst of the worst as far as iconography is concerned. That's a major
        reason why we are so far behind in understanding and projecting any
        knowledge on the Genus on this continent. It is one of my personal
        ambitions to reverse that trend as far Cortinarius in California is
        concerned, but not limited to.
         

         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: cfs_myko
        Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 2:33 PM
        Subject: [MushroomTalk] Very Nice Photos

        Go to Flickr, search for the page by "Jacqueline+ ", she has some very nice work on mushrooms apparently of Quebec. All in French, alas.

      • John Wall
        I love her presentations: http://www.flickr.com/photos/19369983@N06/ Instead of just a photo, each image is basically a poster. Makes me want to get into
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 2, 2009
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          I love her presentations:
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/19369983@N06/

          Instead of just a photo, each image is basically a poster. Makes me want to get into microphotography.

          --John
        • cfs_myko
          The microphotos I take are not manipulated at all if I can avoid it. When I do manipulate them digitally (as in some of the ones you posted here), it is very,
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 2, 2009
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            The microphotos I take are not manipulated at all if I can avoid it.

            When I do manipulate them digitally (as in some of the ones you posted here), it is very, very basic - iPhoto includes a tool for increasing sharpness, which I occassionally use to show relief. I also occassionally use a tool to reduce highlights.

            Increasing the sharpness tends to increase pixelation of fine lines and dramatically increase noise (random information-artifacts inherent in digital photography). Using the highlight-reducer tool is less problematic, but must be used very sparingly, otherwise the image will be too dark and appear very unnatural.

            However, both of these come with unpleasant collateral effects on the image, such that the microphotographs that I have been most pleased with are entirely un-fiddled-with.

            A final tip that I have (which Dimitar learned a long time ago) is that if your camera is able to swivel on its mount on the microscope, pivot it to standardize the orientation of your sample in the photo. By doing this, perfectly horizontal views of the pileipellis, vertical views of cross-sections of the lamellae, etc. are easily acheived.


            Mycelially,
            CS
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