Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

Expand Messages
  • Dimitar Bojantchev
    Hmmm. Debbie, thank you for refreshing the California fungal drought with some points of thought. I am not sure what the physical properties of live mycelium
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2012
    • 0 Attachment

      Hmmm… Debbie, thank you for refreshing the California fungal drought with some points of thought.

       

      I am not sure what the physical properties of live mycelium are, but we know even less so of a dead mycelium. We know that the wood maintains strength even when processed, but I’d be surprised to hear about the “mycelium”.

       

                      D.

       

      P.S. There are a few mushrooms out there actually – I saw some chanterelles and other species in the East Bay during hikes this week.

       

      P.P.S. I hope the latest rains produces some good spring crop.

       

       


      Sent: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 2:47 PM
      Subject: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

       

      I just attended a webinar on alternatives to the toxic building insulation materials that use halogenated flame retardants, and am interested to know that the company that makes packaging material from mycelium will be making non-toxic building insulation boards soon. 
       
       
       
      Debbie

    • Debbie Klein
      I ll find out more but apparently the mycelium composite tests out to be quite strong. The first chart shows it withstands 54 psi (pounds per square inch)
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 3, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        I'll find out more but apparently the mycelium composite tests out to be quite strong. The first chart shows it withstands 54 psi (pounds per square inch) compared to 33 psi with expanded polystyrene. The video "Green Challenge Greensulate" linked below talks about structural insulating panels (SIPS), and the company also will produce other insulation boards that, like the SIPS, will effectively reduce transfer of sound heat and cold.


        Besides that video the link has a video of a TED talk by Paul Stamets on other great uses of mushrooms and mycelium.
        Debbie

        On Thu, Mar 1, 2012 at 11:56 PM, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...> wrote:
         

        Hmmm… Debbie, thank you for refreshing the California fungal drought with some points of thought.

         

        I am not sure what the physical properties of live mycelium are, but we know even less so of a dead mycelium. We know that the wood maintains strength even when processed, but I’d be surprised to hear about the “mycelium”.

         

                        D.

         

        P.S. There are a few mushrooms out there actually – I saw some chanterelles and other species in the East Bay during hikes this week.

         

        P.P.S. I hope the latest rains produces some good spring crop.

         

         


        Sent: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 2:47 PM
        Subject: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

         

        I just attended a webinar on alternatives to the toxic building insulation materials that use halogenated flame retardants, and am interested to know that the company that makes packaging material from mycelium will be making non-toxic building insulation boards soon. 
         
         
         
        Debbie


      • J H
        Mature mycelium is very tough, sometimes like leather depending on the species. Fully colonized petri dishes tend to dull a scalpel quickly. Jason Hauser aka
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 3, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Mature mycelium is very tough, sometimes like leather depending on the species.
           Fully colonized petri dishes tend to dull a scalpel quickly.
           
          Jason Hauser
          aka greys

          Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 8:24 PM
          Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

           

          I'll find out more but apparently the mycelium composite tests out to be quite strong. The first chart shows it withstands 54 psi (pounds per square inch) compared to 33 psi with expanded polystyrene. The video "Green Challenge Greensulate" linked below talks about structural insulating panels (SIPS), and the company also will produce other insulation boards that, like the SIPS, will effectively reduce transfer of sound heat and cold.



          Besides that video the link has a video of a TED talk by Paul Stamets on other great uses of mushrooms and mycelium.
          Debbie

          On Thu, Mar 1, 2012 at 11:56 PM, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...> wrote:
           

          Hmmm… Debbie, thank you for refreshing the California fungal drought with some points of thought.

           

          I am not sure what the physical properties of live mycelium are, but we know even less so of a dead mycelium. We know that the wood maintains strength even when processed, but I’d be surprised to hear about the “mycelium”.

           

                          D.

           

          P.S. There are a few mushrooms out there actually – I saw some chanterelles and other species in the East Bay during hikes this week.

           

          P.P.S. I hope the latest rains produces some good spring crop.

           

           


          Sent: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 2:47 PM
          Subject: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

           

          I just attended a webinar on alternatives to the toxic building insulation materials that use halogenated flame retardants, and am interested to know that the company that makes packaging material from mycelium will be making non-toxic building insulation boards soon. 
           
           
           
          Debbie


        • Dimitar Bojantchev
          Jason, please educate us -- what happens to a dead mycelium? Does it lose its physical properties? D. From: J H Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 5:57 PM To:
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 3, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Jason, please educate us -- what happens to a dead mycelium? Does it lose its physical properties?
             
                D.
             

            From: J H
            Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 5:57 PM
            Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

             

            Mature mycelium is very tough, sometimes like leather depending on the species.
             Fully colonized petri dishes tend to dull a scalpel quickly.
             
            Jason Hauser
            aka greys

            Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 8:24 PM
            Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

             

            I'll find out more but apparently the mycelium composite tests out to be quite strong. The first chart shows it withstands 54 psi (pounds per square inch) compared to 33 psi with expanded polystyrene. The video "Green Challenge Greensulate" linked below talks about structural insulating panels (SIPS), and the company also will produce other insulation boards that, like the SIPS, will effectively reduce transfer of sound heat and cold.



            Besides that video the link has a video of a TED talk by Paul Stamets on other great uses of mushrooms and mycelium.
            Debbie

            On Thu, Mar 1, 2012 at 11:56 PM, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...> wrote:
             

            Hmmm… Debbie, thank you for refreshing the California fungal drought with some points of thought.

             

            I am not sure what the physical properties of live mycelium are, but we know even less so of a dead mycelium. We know that the wood maintains strength even when processed, but I’d be surprised to hear about the “mycelium”.

             

                            D.

             

            P.S. There are a few mushrooms out there actually – I saw some chanterelles and other species in the East Bay during hikes this week.

             

            P.P.S. I hope the latest rains produces some good spring crop.

             

             


            Sent: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 2:47 PM
            Subject: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

             

            I just attended a webinar on alternatives to the toxic building insulation materials that use halogenated flame retardants, and am interested to know that the company that makes packaging material from mycelium will be making non-toxic building insulation boards soon. 
             
             
             
            Debbie


          • J H
            Play
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 3, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Play slideshowPlay slideshowSave all photosSave all photos Want to save all these photos at once? Learn how
              Online pictures are available for 30 days
               
              Dimitar,
              It.really depends upon species. I only have experience with cultured/tamed species-so m experience is limited.
              Ganoderma in particular is extremely tough when "overgrown" on a petri dish, meaning...you have allowed the dish to not only colonize but "grow out' past the point of viability. At this stage Ganoderma mycelium is the consistency of canvas or leather. extremely tough and durable and tends to cut well with a sharp scalpel....taking on a straight line as opposed to tearing in sections. Oyster mycelium is tough but less thick and therefore more easily compromised. Mycelium that is " dead" or has been allowed to eat all available nutrient and has no water to sustain it will in some cases take on a papery consistency, in other species more like leather or dried skin.
               
              In my own experiments with colonizing different substrates, fully colonized oyster mushroom mycelium iis so tough that a very very sharp 10 inch French knife had difficulty cutting it.
               
              the pictures show a "cake" of oysters fully colonizing brown rice and vermiculite pressure cooked in a 1 pint mason jar, it took quite a bit of force to cut the discs of substrate.
               
              Jason Hauser
              aka greys
               
               
               
               
               

              Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 9:01 PM
              Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

               

              Jason, please educate us -- what happens to a dead mycelium? Does it lose its physical properties?
               
                  D.
               

              From: J H
              Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 5:57 PM
              Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

               

              Mature mycelium is very tough, sometimes like leather depending on the species.
               Fully colonized petri dishes tend to dull a scalpel quickly.
               
              Jason Hauser
              aka greys

              Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 8:24 PM
              Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

               

              I'll find out more but apparently the mycelium composite tests out to be quite strong. The first chart shows it withstands 54 psi (pounds per square inch) compared to 33 psi with expanded polystyrene. The video "Green Challenge Greensulate" linked below talks about structural insulating panels (SIPS), and the company also will produce other insulation boards that, like the SIPS, will effectively reduce transfer of sound heat and cold.



              Besides that video the link has a video of a TED talk by Paul Stamets on other great uses of mushrooms and mycelium.
              Debbie

              On Thu, Mar 1, 2012 at 11:56 PM, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...> wrote:
               

              Hmmm… Debbie, thank you for refreshing the California fungal drought with some points of thought.

               

              I am not sure what the physical properties of live mycelium are, but we know even less so of a dead mycelium. We know that the wood maintains strength even when processed, but I’d be surprised to hear about the “mycelium”.

               

                              D.

               

              P.S. There are a few mushrooms out there actually – I saw some chanterelles and other species in the East Bay during hikes this week.

               

              P.P.S. I hope the latest rains produces some good spring crop.

               

               


              Sent: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 2:47 PM
              Subject: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

               

              I just attended a webinar on alternatives to the toxic building insulation materials that use halogenated flame retardants, and am interested to know that the company that makes packaging material from mycelium will be making non-toxic building insulation boards soon. 
               
               
               
              Debbie


            • Dimitar Bojantchev
              Thank you for the elaborate explanation Jason. The properties of that boiled mycelium are truly amazing. I had no idea... D. From: J H Sent: Saturday, March
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 4, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Thank you for the elaborate explanation Jason. The properties of that boiled mycelium are truly amazing. I had no idea...
                 
                        D.
                 

                From: J H
                Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 10:52 PM
                Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium
                 

                Play slideshowPlay slideshowSave all photosSave all photos Want to save all these photos at once? Learn how
                Online pictures are available for 30 days
                 
                Dimitar,
                It.really depends upon species. I only have experience with cultured/tamed species-so m experience is limited.
                Ganoderma in particular is extremely tough when "overgrown" on a petri dish, meaning...you have allowed the dish to not only colonize but "grow out' past the point of viability. At this stage Ganoderma mycelium is the consistency of canvas or leather. extremely tough and durable and tends to cut well with a sharp scalpel....taking on a straight line as opposed to tearing in sections. Oyster mycelium is tough but less thick and therefore more easily compromised. Mycelium that is " dead" or has been allowed to eat all available nutrient and has no water to sustain it will in some cases take on a papery consistency, in other species more like leather or dried skin.
                 
                In my own experiments with colonizing different substrates, fully colonized oyster mushroom mycelium iis so tough that a very very sharp 10 inch French knife had difficulty cutting it.
                 
                the pictures show a "cake" of oysters fully colonizing brown rice and vermiculite pressure cooked in a 1 pint mason jar, it took quite a bit of force to cut the discs of substrate.
                 
                Jason Hauser
                aka greys
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 

                Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 9:01 PM
                Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

                 

                Jason, please educate us -- what happens to a dead mycelium? Does it lose its physical properties?
                 
                    D.
                 

                From: J H
                Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 5:57 PM
                Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

                 

                Mature mycelium is very tough, sometimes like leather depending on the species.
                 Fully colonized petri dishes tend to dull a scalpel quickly.
                 
                Jason Hauser
                aka greys

                Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 8:24 PM
                Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

                 

                I'll find out more but apparently the mycelium composite tests out to be quite strong. The first chart shows it withstands 54 psi (pounds per square inch) compared to 33 psi with expanded polystyrene. The video "Green Challenge Greensulate" linked below talks about structural insulating panels (SIPS), and the company also will produce other insulation boards that, like the SIPS, will effectively reduce transfer of sound heat and cold.



                Besides that video the link has a video of a TED talk by Paul Stamets on other great uses of mushrooms and mycelium.
                Debbie

                On Thu, Mar 1, 2012 at 11:56 PM, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...> wrote:
                 

                Hmmm… Debbie, thank you for refreshing the California fungal drought with some points of thought.

                 

                I am not sure what the physical properties of live mycelium are, but we know even less so of a dead mycelium. We know that the wood maintains strength even when processed, but I’d be surprised to hear about the “mycelium”.

                 

                                D.

                 

                P.S. There are a few mushrooms out there actually – I saw some chanterelles and other species in the East Bay during hikes this week.

                 

                P.P.S. I hope the latest rains produces some good spring crop.

                 

                 


                Sent: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 2:47 PM
                Subject: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

                 

                I just attended a webinar on alternatives to the toxic building insulation materials that use halogenated flame retardants, and am interested to know that the company that makes packaging material from mycelium will be making non-toxic building insulation boards soon. 
                 
                 
                 
                Debbie


              • J H
                Some mycelium isnt tough at all. Laetiporus sulphureus is powdery it is so dry. It is tough to work with in a laboratory for obvious reasons. hericium
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 4, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  Some mycelium isnt tough at all. Laetiporus sulphureus is powdery it is so dry. It is tough to work with in a laboratory for obvious reasons. hericium erinacious is tomentose (fluffy/cottony), morels start out threadlike and eventually overgrow- but are papery when over mature.
                   
                  the photo of the discs of brown rice with oyster mycelium- I cut those with a razor sharp 10 inch long french knife. The consistency was a little tougher than good quality Parmesan Cheese in wheel form.
                   
                  Jason Hauser
                  aha greys

                  Sent: Sunday, March 04, 2012 1:26 PM
                  Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

                   

                  Thank you for the elaborate explanation Jason. The properties of that boiled mycelium are truly amazing. I had no idea...
                   
                          D.
                   

                  From: J H
                  Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 10:52 PM
                  Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium
                   

                  Play slideshowPlay slideshowSave all photosSave all photos Want to save all these photos at once? Learn how
                  Online pictures are available for 30 days
                   
                  Dimitar,
                  It.really depends upon species. I only have experience with cultured/tamed species-so m experience is limited.
                  Ganoderma in particular is extremely tough when "overgrown" on a petri dish, meaning...you have allowed the dish to not only colonize but "grow out' past the point of viability. At this stage Ganoderma mycelium is the consistency of canvas or leather. extremely tough and durable and tends to cut well with a sharp scalpel....taking on a straight line as opposed to tearing in sections. Oyster mycelium is tough but less thick and therefore more easily compromised. Mycelium that is " dead" or has been allowed to eat all available nutrient and has no water to sustain it will in some cases take on a papery consistency, in other species more like leather or dried skin.
                   
                  In my own experiments with colonizing different substrates, fully colonized oyster mushroom mycelium iis so tough that a very very sharp 10 inch French knife had difficulty cutting it.
                   
                  the pictures show a "cake" of oysters fully colonizing brown rice and vermiculite pressure cooked in a 1 pint mason jar, it took quite a bit of force to cut the discs of substrate.
                   
                  Jason Hauser
                  aka greys
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   

                  Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 9:01 PM
                  Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

                   

                  Jason, please educate us -- what happens to a dead mycelium? Does it lose its physical properties?
                   
                      D.
                   

                  From: J H
                  Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 5:57 PM
                  Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

                   

                  Mature mycelium is very tough, sometimes like leather depending on the species.
                   Fully colonized petri dishes tend to dull a scalpel quickly.
                   
                  Jason Hauser
                  aka greys

                  Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2012 8:24 PM
                  Subject: Re: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

                   

                  I'll find out more but apparently the mycelium composite tests out to be quite strong. The first chart shows it withstands 54 psi (pounds per square inch) compared to 33 psi with expanded polystyrene. The video "Green Challenge Greensulate" linked below talks about structural insulating panels (SIPS), and the company also will produce other insulation boards that, like the SIPS, will effectively reduce transfer of sound heat and cold.



                  Besides that video the link has a video of a TED talk by Paul Stamets on other great uses of mushrooms and mycelium.
                  Debbie

                  On Thu, Mar 1, 2012 at 11:56 PM, Dimitar Bojantchev <dimitar@...> wrote:
                   

                  Hmmm… Debbie, thank you for refreshing the California fungal drought with some points of thought.

                   

                  I am not sure what the physical properties of live mycelium are, but we know even less so of a dead mycelium. We know that the wood maintains strength even when processed, but I’d be surprised to hear about the “mycelium”.

                   

                                  D.

                   

                  P.S. There are a few mushrooms out there actually – I saw some chanterelles and other species in the East Bay during hikes this week.

                   

                  P.P.S. I hope the latest rains produces some good spring crop.

                   

                   


                  Sent: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 2:47 PM
                  Subject: [MT] Building Insulation from Mycelium

                   

                  I just attended a webinar on alternatives to the toxic building insulation materials that use halogenated flame retardants, and am interested to know that the company that makes packaging material from mycelium will be making non-toxic building insulation boards soon. 
                   
                   
                   
                  Debbie


                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.