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FW: Proposal that research should be published multilingually

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  • Don Osborn
    This is an excellent idea. (Fwd fromn the lgpolicy-list) Don http://chronicle.com/daily/2007/08/2007082101j.htm ________________________________________
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 21, 2007
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      This is an excellent idea. (Fwd fromn the lgpolicy-list) Don


      http://chronicle.com/daily/2007/08/2007082101j.htm
      ________________________________________

      Tuesday, August 21, 2007

      A glance at the current issue of the International Journal of Applied
      Linguistics: The language of research
      Scholars should be encouraged to submit the same research findings in
      different languages to multiple international journals, say Qiufang Wen, a
      linguist at Beijing Foreign Studies University, and Yihong Gao, an associate
      professor of sociolinguistics, language, and culture at Peking University. 
      Some academics, they write, "believe that submission of the same research
      findings in different languages is a violation of academic ethics," that it
      "constitutes self-plagiarism."

      The authors agree that duplicate publication should be condemned when the
      "new" publication varies in only slight details, "such as title, abstract,
      introduction, and interpretation." But papers that are published in multiple
      languages are unique, they argue, because "different languages involve
      different norms of writing." When translating a paper from Chinese to
      English, for instance, "very often we need to provide more general and
      specific background information, to double or triple the size of the
      literature review, and to reframe the discussion, conclusion, and
      pedagogical implications, so as to target a different set of readers and
      reposition the research in an international context," say the authors.

      "Instead of being forbidden," they argue, the practice should "be encouraged
      so as to maximize the effectiveness of academic communication and equalize
      the rights of creating, distributing, and accessing knowledge." "If we
      believe the ethic that all languages are created equal, and speakers of all
      languages have equal rights in knowledge creation and transmission, it
      follows that research findings originated in different local settings have
      equal value and should have equal access to publication in the world lingua
      franca," add the authors. "This is certainly not the case at present."
      The article, "Dual Publication and Academic Inequality," is available to
      subscribers of for purchase through Blackwell Synergy.
       

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