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Addresses of Hospitals and Clinics

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  • Naher
    Dear All, Can I have a Hospitals and Clinics Address list in the website (Bangladesh)? or, any one got a hard copy? Is there any associattion when I can find
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 30, 2003
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      Dear All,

      Can I have a Hospitals and Clinics Address list in the
      website (Bangladesh)?

      or, any one got a hard copy?

      Is there any associattion when I can find info?

      Regards

      Naher
    • Avijit Roy
      Replying to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MuktoChinta/message/7339 ... the formation of the state called Israel . Seems The author have no idea that many
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 30, 2003
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        Replying to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MuktoChinta/message/7339

        > Please refer to my original concern "How the ATHEIST group justify
        the formation of the state called Israel".

        Seems The author have no idea that many atheists (including me)
        reject the Biblical arguments for Israel's existence in the same way
        they reject the formation of Pakistan, Saudi and other religious
        states.

        And BTW, why should Atheists have to bear the burden to justify the
        existence of israel in the first place? Are all atheists
        Jews/Israelis or supporter of Zionism or what?

        Moreover, from definition, Atheism is characterized by an absence of
        belief in the existence of god/gods. The stand is merely
        philosophical, not political. I am afraid that the author without
        knowing the meaning of the word, is trying push the whole "groups" to
        that region where they differ about any number of concrete
        political/economic/social measures.

        To clarify more, I am an Atheist and I support Palestinian rights. It
        is my political stand. Nothing to do with my philosophical view
        i.e "atheism". It is to be noted that many atheists may not agree
        with my political stand. For example JU or Alamgir may differ with my
        opinion. Mr. Shabbir would ask them individually about their stand
        without making the fallacy of Hasty generalization.


        Avijit.
      • Homa Wassel
        Silenced Again in Kabul By PREETA D. BANSAL and FELICE D. GAER WASHINGTON ����� American efforts to build a democratic, tolerant Afghanistan are facing a
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 1, 2003
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          Silenced Again in Kabul
          By PREETA D. BANSAL and FELICE D. GAER

          WASHINGTON � American efforts to build a democratic, tolerant Afghanistan
          are facing a serious challenge: the draft of the Afghan constitution, which
          may be made public as early as this week, does not yet provide for crucial
          human rights protections, including freedom of thought, conscience and
          religion. The United States and the international community should insist
          that the draft presented by the constitutional commission explicitly protect
          these core human rights for all Afghans.

          Despite reports to the contrary, the current draft versions of the
          constitution enshrine particular schools of Islamic law, or Shariah, that
          criminalize dissent and criticism of Islam through blasphemy laws.

          If this draft is ratified in December by the loya jirga, or grand council,
          the freedoms of Afghan citizens would continue to be in the hands of judges
          educated in Islamic law, rather than in civil law. Official charges of
          blasphemy, apostasy or other religious crimes could still be used to
          suppress debate, just as they were under the Taliban.

          Making changes in the draft is all the more important because, as
          Afghanistan's Human Rights Commission and the United Nations' Assistance
          Mission in Afghanistan have reported, Afghan reformers seeking to express
          their views on their new constitution have been hindered by threats,
          harassment and even imprisonment. In one case, an editor and a reporter have
          been charged with blasphemy for publishing an article questioning the role
          of Islam in the state.

          On our recent trip to Kabul as members of the bipartisan United States
          Commission on International Religious Freedom, we met many Muslims who
          recognize the compatibility of Islam with human rights. Yet these Muslims
          are being intimidated into silence by vocal and well-armed extremists.

          Freedom-loving Afghans won't be able to rely on conscientious judges to
          protect religious freedom without an explicit reference to it in the
          constitution. Afghanistan's chief justice, Fazl Hadi Shinwari, for example,
          has shown little regard for those who disagree with his hard-line
          interpretation of Islam. He told us that he accepted the international
          standards protected by the Universal Declaration on Human Rights � with
          three exceptions: freedom of expression, freedom of religion and equality of
          the sexes. "This is the only law," the chief justice told us, pointing to
          the Koran on his desk.

          Even in a self-proclaimed Islamic republic, however, all citizens, Muslims
          as well as non-Muslims, must be free to debate the role of religion and to
          question prevailing orthodoxies without fear of being subjected to trials,
          prison or death. At a minimum, Afghan leaders should amend the draft
          constitution to specifically ensure the human rights guarantees that
          Afghanistan has already accepted and ratified in six international treaties.
          Afterward, the United States must ensure the safety of reformers who want to
          speak out at the loya jirga to ensure that the constitution of Afghanistan
          makes possible a free and just society based on the rule of law.

          While respecting that Afghans should determine their own future, United
          States officials must not let a "hands off" policy lead to political
          conditions that will embolden repression and enable a few to hijack the
          future from the many Afghans who hope to embrace freedom.

          After all, it is not just Afghanistan's future that is at stake. Iraqis are
          watching to see what minimum standards of individual rights will be
          acceptable to the United States. Unfortunately, the message that the Afghan
          draft constitution is giving Iraq is the wrong one. We should instead send
          our own message to President Hamid Karzai, to Afghan officials and to the
          Afghan people: Americans will only support a state with a constitution that
          clearly and unequivocally enshrines human rights and religious freedom.


          Preeta D. Bansal, former solicitor general of New York State, and Felice D.
          Gaer, director of the Jacob Blaustein Institute for Human Rights, are
          members of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom.

          NYT, October 1, 2003
        • Mahbubul Karim (Sohel)
          Dear Readers, A beautifully written article from James Carroll is attached for your review. Widely revered for his independent writings on range of issues
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 1, 2003
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            Dear Readers,

            A beautifully written article from James Carroll is attached for your review. Widely revered for his independent writings on range of issues including war and politics, this is a bit different from this respected writer. A death of a friend has inspired his introspecting writing:

            “Last week a dear friend of yours died, which no doubt set you to this brooding. The news took your breath away, and you thought for a moment it was gone forever -- with him. He was the funniest person you ever knew, but where was laughter now? When you found your breath once more, however, you knew that you would laugh again. Sure enough, at the thought of his last wisecrack, you did.

             

            Your friend has crossed over into who knows what? At very least, into the living memory of the legion who loved him, including you. Memory, therefore, begins to seem the very center of hope, consciousness itself. This is why infancy lasts long enough for memory to establish itself, and why senility, with luck, is short enough to bid memory farewell. To be a human being is to remember. Memory is how loss is borne, if not recovered from; how confusion gives way to wisdom; how the past reveals itself as relative, leaving the future as the only absolute.

             

            Transcendent memory, in which death is never final, is known to some as afterlife.”

            Regards,
            Mahbubul Karim (Sohel)
            October 1, 2003

            The trees tell you

            By James Carroll, 9/30/2003

            THE TREES tell you what you need to know. It is not the color that draws your gaze, the burnished gold, the red -- the leaves in all their glory. What snags your eyes, rather, is the sure sign of what that glory costs. From spectacular transformations of microscopic chemical reactions within each autumn leaf to the stunning vistas of the distant hills that autumn leaves create, you know very well that this annual high point enshrines the instant of decline. Not for nothing do they call it fall. Autumn points beyond itself to a season of introspection. Nature makes the un-souled world so beautiful just now to conscript the notice of the soul. For once, you are quiet, as your eyes call upon your ears. Looking becomes a way of listening for what the trees are saying. You hear more than the wind. And you see more than is before your eyes.

            When you were young, no one bothered to explain how experience accumulates into knowledge. You could not imagine then how the razor edge of seasonal mortality softens. So you took in each year's poignant turn as if for the first time -- and the last. Autumn was an intimation of all that would never come to be. For one so young, you had no right to the air of gravity you wore like a dandy's cloak. Now the memories of autumn blur together -- the long-gone aroma of burning leaves; the brisk dash-halt-turn of your tight-end buttonhook; the first bite of apple; the sweet bitterness of cider; the chill weather from the north, always a surprise; not to mention how baseball can come to seem all-important. Young Werther melancholy as the season's note gave way, when you grew older, to a steadying acceptance. The sadness in time remained, perhaps, but coexisting with calm gratitude. The actuality of what had been began to weigh more than the lightness of dreams. Gravity reversed itself.

            Last week a dear friend of yours died, which no doubt set you to this brooding. The news took your breath away, and you thought for a moment it was gone forever -- with him. He was the funniest person you ever knew, but where was laughter now? When you found your breath once more, however, you knew that you would laugh again. Sure enough, at the thought of his last wisecrack, you did.

            Your friend has crossed over into who knows what? At very least, into the living memory of the legion who loved him, including you. Memory, therefore, begins to seem the very center of hope, consciousness itself. This is why infancy lasts long enough for memory to establish itself, and why senility, with luck, is short enough to bid memory farewell. To be a human being is to remember. Memory is how loss is borne, if not recovered from; how confusion gives way to wisdom; how the past reveals itself as relative, leaving the future as the only absolute.

            Transcendent memory, in which death is never final, is known to some as afterlife.

            Which brings you back to autumn. How many leaves must fall from the trees for you to get the message? Human life is a snap of the fingers, a flash of green-into-gold, a handful of rotations of the earth, even fewer revolutions around the sun. And that's it. But human life is equally the refusal to be reduced to a mere cycle of nature. As the leaves return to humus, human beings insist on something more. The ancient intuition is that autumnal longing does not go unrequited. The grateful acceptance to which life has brought you involves an accumulation of losses which still do not defeat that longing. Over time -- through time -- desire itself, more than accomplishment, has come to define your hope. That you still feel the poignancy of leaves falling marks you as a creature of the eternal return, imprisoned by the year's cycle. But that your feeling is itself infinitely oceanic marks you also as one who fully expects the thing that has never happened yet. What you long for is the fifth season.

            A life of many autumns has made you a connoisseur of time. As much as that heightens your respect for the lessons of what went before and your tilt toward what is coming, it makes you rather desperate to grasp the here and now.

            The present, if you live it, is the absolute and the afterlife both. The fifth season is come. Thus, the recent loss of one person you loved -- his final gift -- makes you love those who remain to you all the more. Nostalgia and longing are nothing compared to wonder and gratitude before what -- and who -- there is. And that includes, yes, the turning leaves. The trees tell you what you need to know.

            The Boston Globe, September 30, 2003

          • Mahbubul Karim (Sohel)
            Monica Ali�����s Brick Lane: A Book Review By Mahbubul Karim (Sohel) October 1, 2003 http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0743243307/muktochinta-20 Brick
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 1, 2003
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              Monica Ali’s Brick Lane: A Book Review

              By Mahbubul Karim (Sohel)
              October 1, 2003

              =cover
              Brick Lane: A Novel

               

              The life of immigrants, their smiles and laughter, tears and despairs, and the constant struggle of defining and redefining one’s placement in an adopted land, faraway from that place of childhood and intimacy, these all can be found in the periphery of Monica Ali’s startling debut novel, Brick Lane. After being nominated by Granta as one of the best young British writers before her first book was published, there was high expectation from her inaugurated book. With the release of Brick Lane that was short listed by this year’s Man Booker Prize, she has reached to that level of expectation to the inch, perhaps surpassed it by a few slash.

              Here are the very last few paragraphs of Brick Lane that surmise the entire story in quite supple mood:

              “Nazneen turned around. To get on the ice physically – it hardly seemed to matter. In her mind she was already there.

              She said, “But you can’t skate in a sari.”

              Razia was already lacing her boots. “This is England,” she said. “You can do whatever you like”.

              And that’s what Brick Lane about. Nazneen could skate in her sari if she wishes to without caring other people’s approval or disapproval. In a closed society that would be quite scandalous matter indeed.

              Brick Lane does not try to describe religion or an immigrant segment in “black and white”, there are infinite amount of complexities, the lively characters of this novel become so much believable since the author was careful from taking any prejudicial view.

              The story is centered on Nazneen. It begins from the story of her birth in a Bangladeshi village called Gouripur. When she was born, she had “tiny blue body”, and was presumed to be dead. Her relatives advised her parents to take her to the city hospital for better treatment, but her mother, who was from a “family of saint”, “held her daughter to her breast and shook her head. “No, she said, “we must not stand in the way of Fate. Whatever happens, I accept it. And my child must not waste any energy fighting against Fate. That way, she will be stronger.” 

              Throughout the story, Nazneen was depicted as a woman who is struggling through her “fate” of being married to a much older man, Chanu, who has taken her to England. In the beginning, Nazneen was a typical village girl whom Chanu describes as “unspoiled”. She obediently cooks for her husband, cuts his corns, washes dishes, dust all the piled up books and mounting furniture. She walks one step behind Chanu. She listens to Chanu’s chattering, his dreams, his big ambitions, his depiction of “ignorant people”, and his never-ending plans of getting promotion, starting up businesses, his flowery praises of obscure Open University where he is taking classes, his quotations of Shakespeare and other century old writers from his proud English Literature degree from the Dhaka University.

              The way Monica Ali describes Chanu in the first half of this novel with context of Nazneen’s semi-closeted life, the readers will surely feel strong disliking for Chanu. He does not want his wife to go to school to learn English neither he permits her to work though they were financially struggling after Chanu’s resignation from his long held job. Chanu is an ambitious man. He is a man of dreams. Perhaps he lived in his dreams. Nazneen was a good observer. From her years long companionship with her husband she had deduced quite correctly that Chanu would never get success in his career. All the framed and unframed certificates are only for gathering dusts.

              Nazneen has a younger sister, Hasina, who had fled with a boy before she was forced into a marriage of her father’s choosing. Through her correspondences with Nazneen, she describes her life filled with dejection and poverty. With the parallel story unfolding in London, England in Nazneen’s life, readers get a good glimpse on Hasina’s life in Bangladesh. There were vivid descriptions of Hasina when she was a garment worker, her eventual firing from the job for nonsensical reason, her being raped by an older man, and her turning into a prostitute. Hasina never gives up, she fights back to regain her dignity. She begins working in a “respectable” home as a maid. Lovely, the beauty model was her employer. Here Monica Ali interjects observations on Bangladeshi politics, especially, politics related to the plastic industries and its eventual ban.

              By the time Nazneen’s son Raqib was fallen seriously ill, Nazneen had silently begin to question on the religion’s ritual. Here are a few of her thoughts: “From now on when she prayed it would be in a different, better way. She realized with some amazement that, while she had knelt, while she had prostrated herself and recited the words, she had never fully engaged in them. In prayer she sought to stupefy herself like a drunk with a bottle, like a fly against a lantern. This was not the correct way to pray. It was not the correct way to read the suras. It was not the correct way to live”.

              Still she believes in God. Though she was in the midst of confusion regarding the religion and way of the world, in her moment of sadness, around her sick child she still believed that God decides everything. “Whatever she did, only God decided. God knows everything. He knows the number of hairs on your head, don’t forget. Amma said that when they went off to school. She called after them, shouting in her strangled voice. “He sees you, don’t forget. He knows the number of hairs on your head.” She thought about it. No, all that she had done for Raqib was nothing. God decided. She thought about How You Were Left to Your Fate. See! It made no difference. Amma did nothing to save her. And she lived. It was in God’s hands.” But here the skeptic side of Nazneen revolts. She begins to question on believing blindly on fate. “If Nazneen had not brought the baby to the hospital at once, he would have died. The doctors said it. It was no lie. Did she kick about at home wailing and wringing her hands? Did she draw attention to her plight with long sighs and ostentatiously hidden weeping? Did she call piously for God to take what he would and leave her with nothing? Did she act, in short, like her mother? A Saint?” No Nazneen did not act her like “saint” mother, she had taken the matter on her hands rather than living it on “fate” for which Nazneen has gradually less belief. After her son’s untimely death, her skepticisms on religion grew more but still she was a believer.

              In the following years, Nazneen gave birth to two more girls, Shahana and Bibi. As they grew, Chanu became more concerned on their well-beings.  He wanted them to embrace the Bangladeshi culture. He had pride in the history of Bengal. He confides to his wife, “You see, all these people here who look down on us as peasants know nothing of history.” He sat up a little and cleared his throat. “In the sixteenth century, Bengal was called the Paradise of Nations. These are our roots. Do they teach these things in the school here? Does Shahana know about the Paradise of Nations? All she knows about is flood and famine. Whole bloody country is just a bloody basket case to her.” He examined his text further and made little approving, purring noises. “If you have a history, you see, you have a pride. The whole world was going to Bengal to do trade. Sixteenth century and seventeenth century. Dhaka was the home of textiles. Who invented all this muslin and damask and every damn thing? It was us. All the Dutch and Portuguese and French and British queuing up to buy.”

              Now Nazneen begins to question some of Chanu’s remarks. When he made his derogatory remarks on the Sylhetis living in London who for him are “not the best face of our nation”,  Nazneen quietly said,

              “Colonel Osmany, Shah Jalal”.

              “What?” said Chanu. “What?”

              “Our great national hero and –“

              “I know who they are!”

              Nazneen apologized with a smile, and then added, “And that they both come from Sylhet”.

              A new young man arrives in Nazneen’s life, he is Karim, a self-assured man, who begins an organization called “The Bengal Tigers”, to counter the racial intoned leaflets distributed by the racist groups. Unlike Chanu who did not follow religion, Karim was a devoted Muslim. He helped Nazneen get cloth-stitching assignments through his contacts. He begins to pray in her home when Chanu is not around. Nazneen learns various world issues from Karim, she learns the plights of Palestinians in the hands of Israelis in the occupied territory, she learns about the problems in Chechnya and other places.

              Nazneen begins to have self-doubts in her submissive roles as a wife. When they go to grocery, Nazneen still follows Chanu, step behind, “for a moment she saw herself clearly, following her husband, head bowed, hair covered, and she was pleased. In the next instant her feet became heavy and her shoulders ached.” She still strongly believes in Gods, religions and angels and myriads of other beliefs she has retained from her childhood. Here is a good description: “Nazneen adjusted her headscarf. She was conscious of being watched. Everything she did, everything she had done since the day of her birth, was recorded. Sometimes, from the corner of her eye, she thought she saw them. Her two angels, who recorded every action and thought, good and evil, for the Day of Judgment. It struck her then – and the force of it made her grasp – that this street was filled with angels. For every one person there were two more angels; the air was thick with them. She walked with her face turned down to her feet and she felt her head pushing through a density of wings. She was seized with a fear of inhaling spirit, and pulled cloth over her mouth and nose. For the first time, she heard the beating of a thousand angel wings and her legs would take her no further.”

              All these thoughts, the guilt feelings were arising due to Nazneen’s gradual falling in love with Karim, “all the time, Nazneen felt the angels at her back. She jerked her shoulders. Karim came into her mind. The angels noted it. She felt irritated. I did not ask him to come into my mind like that. It was recorded.”

              Nazneen begins to compare her husband with her newfound “love”, “His neck, thought Nazneen, was just right. Not too thick, and not too thin. And he was taqwa. More God-conscious than her own husband.”

              As was noted earlier, the first half of the book presented Chanu as an irritating person, but the second half of the book presents him as a loving husband and a father, as if the writer wants to show a conflict of emotions that Nazneen is going through, deciding who is the one she loves the most. Chanu takes his family to a tour of London, after he has decided that they will return to Bangladesh, away from all the “western corruptions” and “degradation”. He tries to mend his bitter relationship with her older daughter, Shahana. He begins to notice that all of his efforts has not bring him any success in career, here is a few extracts of Chanu’s thoughts: “Sometimes I look back and I am shocked. Every day of my life I have prepared for success, worked for it, waited for it, and you don’t notice how the days pass until nearly a lifetime has finished. Then it hits you – the thing you have been waiting for has already gone by. And it was going in the other direction. It’s like I’ve been waiting on the wrong side of the road for a bus that was already full.”

              Nazneen feels being trapped, she loves her husband Chanu, but Karim “lifts her soul up” that makes her life “colorful”. But a family friend advises her the following: “there are two kinds of love. The kind that starts off big and slowly wears away, that seems you can never use it up and then one day is finished. And the kind that you don’t notice at first, but which adds a little bit to itself every day, like an oyster makes a pearl, grain by grain, a jewel from the sand.”

              September 11, 2001 disasters were portrayed quite eloquently by the author, the thoughts of Muslim immigrants in England at that troubling period of time and aftermath was clearly described as was the life of other sister Hasina, as a maid in a “respectable” home, but still longing for a better life with love.

              Monica Ali builds her story, slowly in the beginning, but the end comes in a storm, the riots in Brick Lane, the drug addicts’ agonies in the struggle of becoming sober again, the heartless dealings with a “usurer” woman and her two thug sons, the kindness of a widow who shows Nazneen the virtue of resilience at the face of mountain like obstacles, the rebellion of Shahana for not wanting to go back to the land that she never knew, Chanu’s determined efforts in hard work, earning money, and losing weights, his silence seemed like more eventful to Nazneen, he feels more assured in his causes while Karim becomes boisterous and less assured.

              All through the story, readers will be amused; they will yearn to know what happens in Nazneen’s life. Monica Ali is successful in maintaining the story thrilling to the end.

            • kazisabbir
              Replying to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MuktoChinta/message/7343 The author has raised a very valid point - why should Atheists have to bear the burden to
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 2, 2003
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                Replying to
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MuktoChinta/message/7343

                The author has raised a very valid point - "why should Atheists have
                to bear the burden to justify" - my sincere apology to him for using
                the strong word "justify", "view" would be a more appropriate word
                rather. Zionist and the supporters of Israel may have some grounds
                to justify the formation of Israel in the promised land of Palestine.

                Author wrote: "Moreover, from definition, Atheism is characterized by
                an absence of belief in the existence of god/gods. The stand is
                merely philosophical, not political. I am afraid that the author
                without knowing the meaning of the word, is trying push the
                whole "groups" to that region where they differ about any number of
                concrete political/economic/social measures."

                I am also afraid that the author has failed to figure out the origin
                and reason for my concern.

                Actually my concern started with Mr. Fatemollah's (a prominent
                atheist, please correct me if I am wrong) concerns over
                the "Political Islam". I suggested him not to narrow down his focus
                to Islam only, rather hit all the religions
                (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MuktoChinta/message/7160). In that
                regard I asked him about his personal opinion/justification (sorry
                again for using the word "justification" in my message to him) on
                Zionist offensives done to Palestine Arabs (later some member in this
                forum hastily generalized them as Muslims). He chose to ignore my
                mail. (I still like to know about his personal opinion on the birth
                of Israel and the offensives done to Palestinian Arabs).

                In my second mail in this regard, I expressed the same concern to the
                Atheist group
                (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MuktoChinta/message/7253) and asking
                for their "justification" (sorry again, please replace the word
                with "view" in my original message) for Israel's option to kill Mr.
                Arafat. Being an atheist, author replied my mail with his personal
                view together with an article written by another secularist
                (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MuktoChinta/message/7298). That
                article suggests that morally Israel has every right to protect her
                promised land.

                I must admit that it is my personal curiosity to understand the moral
                obligations for an atheist for Israel's case. If some one rejects the
                formation of Israel in their promised land Palestine because it is
                based on divine books, how can the same person justify the same
                Israel's existence in the same place? Simply because this group of
                people badly needed a sanctuary! Why not in other place? How can the
                same person morally support Israel's offensive done (and being done)
                to indigenous Palestine Arabs in the name of protecting their
                promised land. To me this is a basic moral issue, let alone other
                issues like "Greater Israel" and so on.

                Not being convinced, I expressed my concern again
                (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MuktoChinta/message/7332) and got this
                reply - "To clarify more, I am an Atheist and I support Palestinian
                rights. It is my political stand. Nothing to do with my philosophical
                view i.e "atheism". It is to be noted that many
                Atheists may not agree with my political stand. For example JU or
                Alamgir may differ with my opinion. Mr. Shabbir would ask them
                individually about their stand without making the fallacy of Hasty
                generalization."
                (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MuktoChinta/message/7343).

                Now, coming back to my original concern - Political Islam. Why
                only "No to Political Islam"? Why not "No to Religious Politics"?
                Anyway, Mr. Fatemollah is reluctant to work on other religions except
                Islam (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MuktoChinta/message/7325).


                Why NOT "No to WRONG" and "Yes to RIGHT"?

                Sabbir

                PS: I always appreciate people who write my name in correct spelling.


                [mz]
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