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Re: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

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  • Lori Loranger
    I have a friend who keeps bees and get honey from her by the gallon. Have to go to the store for those lemons, though! ;^) The vast majority of what grows
    Message 1 of 25 , Sep 4, 2006
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      I have a friend who keeps bees and get honey from her by the gallon.  Have to go to the store for those lemons, though!  ;^)
       
      The vast majority of what grows here is edible, especially considering that nearly all grass seed and (inner) tree bark can be eaten.  Since I've been on the same couple acres for 25 years now, I've had the chance to really get to know my local weeds.  (I'm in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area - across the river from Multnomah Falls area).
       
      Nettles are extremely nutritious.  Sensible people wear gloves to harvest them; I just take a pair of scissors and a paper bag, and cut the tops of the nettles into the bag.  I dump what will fit from the bag into a pot of boiling water, and leave the rest in the bag to dry.  Once cooked, they can be used in any recipe you'd put cooked spinach in, or seasoned and eaten as a green.  The dried nettles can be used as an herb, sprinkling a bit into this or that, or for tea.  Mint, lemon balm, and nettles together make a lovely iced tea.
       
      Wow - around here, June is when we finally come out of the spring rainy season and have a few months dry enough to work the soil!  It's mild enough to garden cool weather stuff nearly year 'round; other stuff can be planted late and overwintered to start early in the spring.  I have radishes, cabbages and the like planting themselves - they tend to know what they're doing better than I do.  It's a rather laissez faire garden ;^)
       
      I don't know how daylilies would do in your climate, but they seem pretty adaptable.  Not only can you eat the flowers, but the stalks, before flowering, are delicious, and later they make yummy little tubers.  A beautiful and useful plant!
       
      I love sending my kids out to "graze" - they come in full of sorrel, clover and berries.  And I know they'd have sense enough to eat the bounty around them in an emergency survival situation.  I figure that knowing how to provide yourself food and shelter is at least as important as geography, math, or the other "required" subjects.
      Teaching to the tests in school doesn't allow much leeway for learning common sense sort of things.  A friend of mine was recently involved in a play with her 13 y.o. daughter - a few of the girls needed to light candles in the play; her daughter was the only one who'd used matches before.  She had to teach several teenage girls how to light a match.
       
      Well, ask me about wild plants or home education and I'll just go on and on!
      peace to you
      -Lori
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, August 31, 2006 9:38 AM
      Subject: RE: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

      Wow, I’ll have to remember that lemon cure. Especially as I have a very productive lemon tree, and we can get raw honey from Orange County ( Aliso Canyon ).

      You have some serious herbal knowledge there! I admire your skill! I’m currently in the city and all we get are dandelions. We’re also too warm to grow elderberries, and several of the others. I may try chickweed and nettles, I figure the chickweed is something I can grow in winter and if I don’t like it, it will be dead by June from the heat. (Here in SoCal the birds are finally returning, summer is our slow season for birds—and we’re gearing up for our fall planting. You plant in early fall although my timing still isn’t quite right and you’re supposed to have fresh veggies for Thanksgiving and the holidays. You can garden pretty much the year around)

      Lidia

      .

    • Lidia Seebeck
      Wow, never been to Oregon aside from a lovely trip to Portland once. It sure sounds like you live away from it all in a way that I sure can t. Back in
      Message 2 of 25 , Sep 4, 2006
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        Wow, never been to Oregon aside from a lovely trip to Portland once. It sure sounds like you live “away from it all” in a way that I sure can’t. Back in Colorado we did have some edibles growing wild… Maxmillian sunflower, Englemann prickly pears, Yucca root…and I know there are edibles growing wild still in parts of California , just not here in the city.

         

        I did know that about the nettles and how they are okay once cooked.

         

        We are mostly out of the rain in April or so, it gets hot in late June (by hot I mean 100 plus degrees with some certainty) and cools off in a few weeks from now. I hope Tropical Storm/ Depression John decides to go straight north into California . So far it’s on track.  We haven’t seen rain since mid-July.

         

        I think I saw daylilies growing near March AFB, so they probably do grow here.

         

        I really do think you are on the right track with your kids and survival training. Heck, even if times get better the kids could teach their skills to others. There’s a lot of money to be made in survival training. Do you teach any classes?

         

        Lidia

         


        From: MothersForLiberty@yahoogroups.com [mailto: MothersForLiberty@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Lori Loranger
        Sent: Monday, September 04, 2006 8:49 AM
        To: MothersForLiberty@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

         

        I have a friend who keeps bees and get honey from her by the gallon.  Have to go to the store for those lemons, though!  ;^)

         

        The vast majority of what grows here is edible, especially considering that nearly all grass seed and (inner) tree bark can be eaten.  Since I've been on the same couple acres for 25 years now, I've had the chance to really get to know my local weeds.  (I'm in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area - across the river from Multnomah Falls area).

         

        Nettles are extremely nutritious.  Sensible people wear gloves to harvest them; I just take a pair of scissors and a paper bag, and cut the tops of the nettles into the bag.  I dump what will fit from the bag into a pot of boiling water, and leave the rest in the bag to dry.  Once cooked, they can be used in any recipe you'd put cooked spinach in, or seasoned and eaten as a green.  The dried nettles can be used as an herb, sprinkling a bit into this or that, or for tea.  Mint, lemon balm, and nettles together make a lovely iced tea.

         

        Wow - around here, June is when we finally come out of the spring rainy season and have a few months dry enough to work the soil!  It's mild enough to garden cool weather stuff nearly year 'round; other stuff can be planted late and overwintered to start early in the spring.  I have radishes, cabbages and the like planting themselves - they tend to know what they're doing better than I do.  It's a rather laissez faire garden ;^)

         

        I don't know how daylilies would do in your climate, but they seem pretty adaptable.  Not only can you eat the flowers, but the stalks, before flowering, are delicious, and later they make yummy little tubers.  A beautiful and useful plant!

         

        I love sending my kids out to "graze" - they come in full of sorrel, clover and berries.  And I know they'd have sense enough to eat the bounty around them in an emergency survival situation.  I figure that knowing how to provide yourself food and shelter is at least as important as geography, math, or the other "required" subjects.

        Teaching to the tests in school doesn't allow much leeway for learning common sense sort of things.  A friend of mine was recently involved in a play with her 13 y.o. daughter - a few of the girls needed to light candles in the play; her daughter was the only one who'd used matches before.  She had to teach several teenage girls how to light a match.

         

        Well, ask me about wild plants or home education and I'll just go on and on!

        peace to you

        -Lori

         

        ----- Original Message -----

        Sent: Thursday, August 31, 2006 9:38 AM

        Subject: RE: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

         

        Wow, I’ll have to remember that lemon cure. Especially as I have a very productive lemon tree, and we can get raw honey from Orange County ( Aliso Canyon ).

        You have some serious herbal knowledge there! I admire your skill! I’m currently in the city and all we get are dandelions. We’re also too warm to grow elderberries, and several of the others. I may try chickweed and nettles, I figure the chickweed is something I can grow in winter and if I don’t like it, it will be dead by June from the heat. (Here in SoCal the birds are finally returning, summer is our slow season for birds—and we’re gearing up for our fall planting. You plant in early fall although my timing still isn’t quite right and you’re supposed to have fresh veggies for Thanksgiving and the holidays. You can garden pretty much the year around)

        Lidia

        .



      • Lori Loranger
        I m about 40 minutes from Portland. My older daughters both live in Vancouver, which is just across the I-5 bridge from Portland. I get into the big city
        Message 3 of 25 , Sep 5, 2006
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          I'm about 40 minutes from Portland.  My older daughters both live in Vancouver, which is just across the I-5 bridge from Portland.  I get into the big city every week for taiji class, and to get Zoë to her youth radio meetings.
          I've had interested people from our homeschool group out several times to do wild weed walks around our property, as well as the occasional individual who wants to learn more about local wild edibles.
          I've never done this for pay, but have been to a class or two over the years and come away with the realization that I know more than the teacher.
          I think a motivated person can make money at just about anything they know well or are good at.
          Maybe in the future I'll make a fortune at "Lori's school of taiji and weed eating"  ;^)
          peace!
          -Lori
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, September 04, 2006 4:01 PM
          Subject: RE: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

          Wow, never been to Oregon aside from a lovely trip to Portland once. It sure sounds like you live “away from it all” in a way that I sure can’t. Back in Colorado we did have some edibles growing wild… Maxmillian sunflower, Englemann prickly pears, Yucca root…and I know there are edibles growing wild still in parts of California , just not here in the city.

          I did know that about the nettles and how they are okay once cooked.

          We are mostly out of the rain in April or so, it gets hot in late June (by hot I mean 100 plus degrees with some certainty) and cools off in a few weeks from now. I hope Tropical Storm/ Depression John decides to go straight north into California . So far it’s on track.  We haven’t seen rain since mid-July.

          I think I saw daylilies growing near March AFB, so they probably do grow here.

          I really do think you are on the right track with your kids and survival training. Heck, even if times get better the kids could teach their skills to others. There’s a lot of money to be made in survival training. Do you teach any classes?

          Lidia


          From: MothersForLiberty@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: MothersForLiberty@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of Lori Loranger
          Sent: Monday, September 04, 2006 8:49 AM
          To: MothersForLiberty@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: Re: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

          I have a friend who keeps bees and get honey from her by the gallon.  Have to go to the store for those lemons, though!  ;^)

          The vast majority of what grows here is edible, especially considering that nearly all grass seed and (inner) tree bark can be eaten.  Since I've been on the same couple acres for 25 years now, I've had the chance to really get to know my local weeds.  (I'm in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area - across the river from Multnomah Falls area).

          Nettles are extremely nutritious.  Sensible people wear gloves to harvest them; I just take a pair of scissors and a paper bag, and cut the tops of the nettles into the bag.  I dump what will fit from the bag into a pot of boiling water, and leave the rest in the bag to dry.  Once cooked, they can be used in any recipe you'd put cooked spinach in, or seasoned and eaten as a green.  The dried nettles can be used as an herb, sprinkling a bit into this or that, or for tea.  Mint, lemon balm, and nettles together make a lovely iced tea.

          Wow - around here, June is when we finally come out of the spring rainy season and have a few months dry enough to work the soil!  It's mild enough to garden cool weather stuff nearly year 'round; other stuff can be planted late and overwintered to start early in the spring.  I have radishes, cabbages and the like planting themselves - they tend to know what they're doing better than I do.  It's a rather laissez faire garden ;^)

          I don't know how daylilies would do in your climate, but they seem pretty adaptable.  Not only can you eat the flowers, but the stalks, before flowering, are delicious, and later they make yummy little tubers.  A beautiful and useful plant!

          I love sending my kids out to "graze" - they come in full of sorrel, clover and berries.  And I know they'd have sense enough to eat the bounty around them in an emergency survival situation.  I figure that knowing how to provide yourself food and shelter is at least as important as geography, math, or the other "required" subjects.

          Teaching to the tests in school doesn't allow much leeway for learning common sense sort of things.  A friend of mine was recently involved in a play with her 13 y.o. daughter - a few of the girls needed to light candles in the play; her daughter was the only one who'd used matches before.  She had to teach several teenage girls how to light a match.

          Well, ask me about wild plants or home education and I'll just go on and on!

          peace to you

          -Lori

          ----- Original Message -----

          Sent: Thursday, August 31, 2006 9:38 AM

          Subject: RE: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

          Wow, I’ll have to remember that lemon cure. Especially as I have a very productive lemon tree, and we can get raw honey from Orange County ( Aliso Canyon ).

          You have some serious herbal knowledge there! I admire your skill! I’m currently in the city and all we get are dandelions. We’re also too warm to grow elderberries, and several of the others. I may try chickweed and nettles, I figure the chickweed is something I can grow in winter and if I don’t like it, it will be dead by June from the heat. (Here in SoCal the birds are finally returning, summer is our slow season for birds—and we’re gearing up for our fall planting. You plant in early fall although my timing still isn’t quite right and you’re supposed to have fresh veggies for Thanksgiving and the holidays. You can garden pretty much the year around)

          Lidia

          .




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          Checked by AVG Free Edition.
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        • Lidia Seebeck
          Go for it! I’m still batting the idea around of teaching SoCal sorts on how to turn their backyard into a garden. I think I’m getting pretty good at
          Message 4 of 25 , Sep 5, 2006
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            Go for it! I’m still batting the idea around of teaching SoCal sorts on how to turn their backyard into a garden. I think I’m getting pretty good at it—perhaps excepting the fall garden cycle—and I think I can teach some others new tricks. This place is nuts—on a Saturday night no one seems to be at home—it is impossible to get a good seat at a restaurant, unless perhaps the restaurant doesn’t serve alcohol. The more expensive and improbable the food, the more they flock to it. I saw one high-end place that had a line out the front. We didn’t even ask how long the wait was. Maybe if they had a garden to think about, they could spend the time that they would have waited for their dinner instead working and eating from a garden. The amount of time would not be all that different. The concept of wild edibles is probably too esoteric for most of them.

             

            How about the “School for Survival and Balance”?

             

            Lidia

             


            From: MothersForLiberty@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MothersForLiberty@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lori Loranger
            Sent: Tuesday, September 05, 2006 8:58 AM
            To: MothersForLiberty@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

             

            I'm about 40 minutes from Portland .  My older daughters both live in Vancouver , which is just across the I-5 bridge from Portland .  I get into the big city every week for taiji class, and to get Zoë to her youth radio meetings.

            I've had interested people from our homeschool group out several times to do wild weed walks around our property, as well as the occasional individual who wants to learn more about local wild edibles.

            I've never done this for pay, but have been to a class or two over the years and come away with the realization that I know more than the teacher.

            I think a motivated person can make money at just about anything they know well or are good at.

            Maybe in the future I'll make a fortune at "Lori's school of taiji and weed eating"  ;^)

            peace!

            -Lori

             

            ----- Original Message -----

            Sent: Monday, September 04, 2006 4:01 PM

            Subject: RE: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

             

            Wow, never been to Oregon aside from a lovely trip to Portland once. It sure sounds like you live “away from it all” in a way that I sure can’t. Back in Colorado we did have some edibles growing wild… Maxmillian sunflower, Englemann prickly pears, Yucca root…and I know there are edibles growing wild still in parts of California , just not here in the city.

            I did know that about the nettles and how they are okay once cooked.

            We are mostly out of the rain in April or so, it gets hot in late June (by hot I mean 100 plus degrees with some certainty) and cools off in a few weeks from now. I hope Tropical Storm/ Depression John decides to go straight north into California . So far it’s on track.  We haven’t seen rain since mid-July.

            I think I saw daylilies growing near March AFB, so they probably do grow here.

            I really do think you are on the right track with your kids and survival training. Heck, even if times get better the kids could teach their skills to others. There’s a lot of money to be made in survival training. Do you teach any classes?

            Lidia


            From: MothersForLiberty@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: MothersForLiberty@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of Lori Loranger
            Sent: Monday, September 04, 2006 8:49 AM
            To: MothersForLiberty@ yahoogroups. com
            Subject: Re: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

            I have a friend who keeps bees and get honey from her by the gallon.  Have to go to the store for those lemons, though!  ;^)

            The vast majority of what grows here is edible, especially considering that nearly all grass seed and (inner) tree bark can be eaten.  Since I've been on the same couple acres for 25 years now, I've had the chance to really get to know my local weeds.  (I'm in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area - across the river from Multnomah Falls area).

            Nettles are extremely nutritious.  Sensible people wear gloves to harvest them; I just take a pair of scissors and a paper bag, and cut the tops of the nettles into the bag.  I dump what will fit from the bag into a pot of boiling water, and leave the rest in the bag to dry.  Once cooked, they can be used in any recipe you'd put cooked spinach in, or seasoned and eaten as a green.  The dried nettles can be used as an herb, sprinkling a bit into this or that, or for tea.  Mint, lemon balm, and nettles together make a lovely iced tea.

            Wow - around here, June is when we finally come out of the spring rainy season and have a few months dry enough to work the soil!  It's mild enough to garden cool weather stuff nearly year 'round; other stuff can be planted late and overwintered to start early in the spring.  I have radishes, cabbages and the like planting themselves - they tend to know what they're doing better than I do.  It's a rather laissez faire garden ;^)

            I don't know how daylilies would do in your climate, but they seem pretty adaptable.  Not only can you eat the flowers, but the stalks, before flowering, are delicious, and later they make yummy little tubers.  A beautiful and useful plant!

            I love sending my kids out to "graze" - they come in full of sorrel, clover and berries.  And I know they'd have sense enough to eat the bounty around them in an emergency survival situation.  I figure that knowing how to provide yourself food and shelter is at least as important as geography, math, or the other "required" subjects.

            Teaching to the tests in school doesn't allow much leeway for learning common sense sort of things.  A friend of mine was recently involved in a play with her 13 y.o. daughter - a few of the girls needed to light candles in the play; her daughter was the only one who'd used matches before.  She had to teach several teenage girls how to light a match.

            Well, ask me about wild plants or home education and I'll just go on and on!

            peace to you

            -Lori

            ----- Original Message -----

            Sent: Thursday, August 31, 2006 9:38 AM

            Subject: RE: [MothersForLiberty] Re: New Member

            Wow, I’ll have to remember that lemon cure. Especially as I have a very productive lemon tree, and we can get raw honey from Orange County ( Aliso Canyon ).

            You have some serious herbal knowledge there! I admire your skill! I’m currently in the city and all we get are dandelions. We’re also too warm to grow elderberries, and several of the others. I may try chickweed and nettles, I figure the chickweed is something I can grow in winter and if I don’t like it, it will be dead by June from the heat. (Here in SoCal the birds are finally returning, summer is our slow season for birds—and we’re gearing up for our fall planting. You plant in early fall although my timing still isn’t quite right and you’re supposed to have fresh veggies for Thanksgiving and the holidays. You can garden pretty much the year around)

            Lidia

            .




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            Checked by AVG Free Edition.
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          • Jan
            Bonnie wrote: I coined a new phrase last month: Vegetable Freedom Day. You know: Tax Freedom Day is the day of the year where you ve earned enough money to
            Message 5 of 25 , Sep 27, 2006
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              Bonnie wrote: I coined a new phrase last month: "Vegetable Freedom
              Day." You know: "Tax Freedom Day" is the day of the year where you've
              earned enough money to pay the year's taxes, if it had all gone to
              taxes up to that point.

              "Vegetable Freedom Day" is the day of the year when you no longer
              have to buy veggies for the rest of the growing season!

              ---------

              Bonnie,

              Love your phrase "Vegetable Freedom Day"!!! I also enjoyed everyone's
              posts on gardening, etc...

              We're such a diverse group here - full of different talents, interests,
              and experiences - makes for great reading and good friends.

              Jan
            • amie cotterill
              Hello, My name is Amy, I am in the process of moving with My husband and young daughter to Claremont NH as a part of the fsp. I would love to join your group.
              Message 6 of 25 , Nov 3, 2009
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                Hello, My name is Amy, I am in the process of moving with My husband and young daughter to Claremont NH as a part of the fsp. I would love to join your group.
                Thank you

                Peace Amy


              • libertyjan2005
                Welcome Amy ... good to have you with us here at Mothers for Liberty! I believe we have some other free-staters in our group as well. Care to share with us
                Message 7 of 25 , Nov 5, 2009
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                  Welcome Amy ... good to have you with us here at Mothers for Liberty! I believe we have some other free-staters in our group as well.

                  Care to share with us what motivated you and your husband to make the decision to move to NH as part of the FSP?

                  Jan

                  -------------------------

                  Hello, My name is Amy, I am in the process of moving with My husband and young daughter to Claremont NH as a part of the fsp. I would love to join your group.

                  Thank you
                  Peace Amy
                • treefrog01984
                  Howdy Jan, Our family is moving to New Hampshire because we want liberty in our life time, we want our personal / individual rights to be respected and we are
                  Message 8 of 25 , Nov 8, 2009
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                    Howdy Jan,

                    Our family is moving to New Hampshire because we want liberty in our life time, we want our personal / individual rights to be respected
                    and we are tired of being forced to do things that go against our believes for the benefit of others. We want to run our own lives. I feel that the FSP is a really positive and peaceful group of folks ready and willing to do all in their power to protect our rights as individuals and I am proud to say that I am too.

                    We currently live in Vermont, so the move isn't a real big thing for us. We will continue at the same jobs and our daughter will still go to the same sitter, we just tacked on another 20 minutes each way to our commute each way. We are buying our first home, we close 11/16 and New Hampshire just seemed like the logical choice for us.

                    Peace Amy
                  • libertyjan2005
                    Amy ... congrats on your new house and best wishes on your upcoming move. Please keep us posted as to how your new location and involvement with the FSP is
                    Message 9 of 25 , Nov 11, 2009
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                      Amy ... congrats on your new house and best wishes on your upcoming move. Please keep us posted as to how your new location and involvement with the FSP is helping you experience the added benefits of freedom and friendship among like-minded New Hampshirites!

                      Jan

                      -------------------
                      Amy wrote: Howdy Jan, Our family is moving to New Hampshire because we want liberty in our life time, we want our personal / individual rights to be respected and we are tired of being forced to do things that go against our believes for the benefit of others. We want to run our own lives. I feel that the FSP is a really positive and peaceful group of folks ready and willing to do all in their power to protect our rights as individuals and I am proud to say that I am too.

                      We currently live in Vermont, so the move isn't a real big thing for us. We will continue at the same jobs and our daughter will still go to the same sitter, we just tacked on another 20 minutes each way to our commute each way. We are buying our first home, we close 11/16 and New Hampshire just seemed like the logical choice for us.
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