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Re: Towards More Prototype Modeling (Poling Pockets & Poling)

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  • Bill Sharp
    Thanks for all the info, fellas. I m 73 and never saw it happen in my youth. My great-uncle was an engineer on the P & LE; wish he was still alive so I could
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 1, 2012
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      Thanks for all the info, fellas. I'm 73 and never saw it happen in my youth. My great-uncle was an engineer on the P & LE; wish he was still alive so I could ask him.
    • Bob Chaparro
      Mel Perry was kind enough to pass this along for our use. Bob Chaparro Moderator +++++ Ken, A major correction would be to recognize the Interchange Rules were
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 1, 2012
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        Mel Perry was kind enough to pass this along for our use.

        Bob Chaparro
        Moderator
        +++++
        Ken,

        A major correction would be to recognize the Interchange Rules were formulated by the Master Car Builders' Association (1877-1919), The American Railroad Association (1919-20), The American Railway Association (1920-34) and The Association of American Railroads (1934-Present), not just The ARA and The AAR.

        The Interchange Rules verbage seldom, if ever, used the term "banned." Rather, the Rules stated; "will not be accepted in interchange," or "prohibited in interchange." Generally, the use of the first was used in conjunction with an upcoming date of prohibition and the latter after the rule had been imposed. "Will not be accepted from owners" was an earlier phrase often used within the context of the rules synonomous with, "will not be accepted in Interchange." The Arbitration Committee of the ARA was challenged by several member railroads as to the use of this phrasing, thus changed the rules throughout the course of the 1920s.

        A few items which have incorrect dates or misleading information:

        "April 7, 1927 ~ load limit star stencil recommended, when limit is not bearings"

        The date is correct, but the load limit was based on axle rating (as per rule 86).

        "1928 ~ wood draft sills banned from interchange"

        Cars of all wood construction, "Class - F" were prohibited in interchange on January 1, 1935.

        "1937 ~ Most billboard markings gone off boxcars and reefers"

        The original date prohibiting the use of refrigerator cars bearing advertisements of any shipper, consignee, or product was January 1, 1937. The AAR's Board of Directors extended the date to April 1, 1937 (via supplement) in 1936. In 1937 the rule was revised to include all other types of cars except special cars of Mechanical Designation "L" and tank cars of Mechanical Designation "T".

        Guy Wilber
        Sparks, Nevada
      • Don DeLay
        ... I rode with a Santa Fe crew back in the 70 s and while switching Miramar Air Base in San Diego, a car positioned behind the locomotive being Dutch dropped
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 1, 2012
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          Bob Chaparro wrote:
          >Santa Fe crews were strongly discouraged from poling, though some did it anyway when the alternatives would have taken a lot of time and effort.

          I rode with a Santa Fe crew back in the 70's and while switching Miramar Air Base in San Diego, a car positioned behind the locomotive being Dutch dropped into a facing point spur didn't quite clear the switch as it rolled to a sudden stop. Bummer! The dilemma was that the engine was now trapped on a dead end track with the errant car blocking our escape back to the main. The discussion of calling the dispatcher to send out a yard engine from downtown to rescue us was quickly dismissed and the crew began scavenging the right of way for something to push the car into the clear. Soon a large 4x4 was found and placed against the end of the car and the steps on the locomotive. A complete release of the handbrake on the car and a gentle shove by the locomotive and we were soon back in business. Just another routine day of problem solving by savvy railroaders, with no one being injured.

          Don DeLay

           
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