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Question about painting brick buildings

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  • cphuntington
    On one of the layout tours a couple years ago there was a layout with a 1930 s Southern California theme. One outstanding features of the layout was the
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 1, 2011
      On one of the layout tours a couple years ago there was a layout with a 1930's Southern
      California theme. One outstanding features of the layout was the numerous
      brick buildings. The colors on these buildings was impressive - it
      looked exactly like weathered brick. The layout's owner shared with
      his visitors how it was done and I took down a few notes. Later, I got
      the paints and tried it on a scrap piece of brick wall and got very
      good results. It was several months later that got around to trying this on a
      factory I was constructing. Unfortunately, I had forgotten the process and
      could not find my notes. I went ahead anyway and painted part of the
      factory but the results were less than good. All I can remember is
      that you put down a coat of tan colored paint first and then put layers
      of red/brown/orange over the tan. Does anyone remember the method that
      was used to apply the brick colors over the tan paint? Was the paint
      thinned or dry brushed on? How do you keep the paint from running
      down between the bricks and covering the tan painted mortor lines?
      The only other information that I can give is that the brand of paint is "Ceramcoat".
      Thanks for any help you may give me.
    • Joe Jefferson
      I don t know whose layout you re remembering, but drybrushing will keep the paint on the bricks and out of the mortar. Another option that I ve read about but
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2011
        I don't know whose layout you're remembering, but drybrushing will keep
        the paint on the bricks and out of the mortar. Another option that I've
        read about but haven't tried yet is to use the paint pens you can find
        in craft stores. Those should also let you paint only the bricks,
        especially if you can find some with chisel tips.

        On 12/1/11 1:28 AM, cphuntington wrote:
        > On one of the layout tours a couple years ago there was a layout with a
        > 1930's Southern
        > California theme. One outstanding features of the layout was the numerous
        > brick buildings. The colors on these buildings was impressive - it
        > looked exactly like weathered brick. The layout's owner shared with
        > his visitors how it was done and I took down a few notes. Later, I got
        > the paints and tried it on a scrap piece of brick wall and got very
        > good results. It was several months later that got around to trying this
        > on a
        > factory I was constructing. Unfortunately, I had forgotten the process and
        > could not find my notes. I went ahead anyway and painted part of the
        > factory but the results were less than good. All I can remember is
        > that you put down a coat of tan colored paint first and then put layers
        > of red/brown/orange over the tan. Does anyone remember the method that
        > was used to apply the brick colors over the tan paint? Was the paint
        > thinned or dry brushed on? How do you keep the paint from running
        > down between the bricks and covering the tan painted mortor lines?
        > The only other information that I can give is that the brand of paint is
        > "Ceramcoat".
        > Thanks for any help you may give me.
        >
      • David Rickey
        Larry is a member of the Glendale Model Railroad Club (as am I) and I will forward your request. He indeed has some really nice buildings on his layout and
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 1, 2011
          Larry is a member of the Glendale Model Railroad Club (as am I) and I will forward your request.  He indeed has some really nice buildings on his layout and the scenery in general is great.

          David R


          On 12/1/2011 1:28 AM, cphuntington wrote:
           

          On one of the layout tours a couple years ago there was a layout with a 1930's Southern
          California theme. One outstanding features of the layout was the numerous
          brick buildings. The colors on these buildings was impressive - it
          looked exactly like weathered brick. The layout's owner shared with
          his visitors how it was done and I took down a few notes. Later, I got
          the paints and tried it on a scrap piece of brick wall and got very
          good results. It was several months later that got around to trying this on a
          factory I was constructing. Unfortunately, I had forgotten the process and
          could not find my notes. I went ahead anyway and painted part of the
          factory but the results were less than good. All I can remember is
          that you put down a coat of tan colored paint first and then put layers
          of red/brown/orange over the tan. Does anyone remember the method that
          was used to apply the brick colors over the tan paint? Was the paint
          thinned or dry brushed on? How do you keep the paint from running
          down between the bricks and covering the tan painted mortor lines?
          The only other information that I can give is that the brand of paint is "Ceramcoat".
          Thanks for any help you may give me.

        • mike white
          Hi Jeff, end everyone-  I m brand new to your group and this is my first contact with all of you.  I hope this info. is helpful?  My bashed factory (still
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 2, 2011
          Hi Jeff, end everyone-  I'm brand new to your group and this is my first contact with all of you.  I hope this info. is helpful?  My bashed factory (still in the works) started out as a plastic sheet of white bricks.  I first spray the sheet flat black.  Once dry I dry brush the sheet with whatever color you want the bricks to be. tan, gray red, etc.  For my factory I used red oxide - a $.99 bottle from a craft store.  Use just enough paint on your brush to lightly coat the top of the bricks.  If you get some in the mortar joints it's not that big a deal.  At this point you will not be pleased with the results thus far but be patient.  Next I take my sticks of chalk (white, tan, brown, gray and a little rust) and using a scrap piece of wood I run the wood along the chalk sticks letting the dust fall onto the painted brick sheet.  Then I take a paint brush and work the chalk dust into the bricks.  At this point you will still not be pleased with the results thus far but be patient.  Finally, I lightly wet my finger and rub it over the bricks.  This will remove most of the chalk from the bricks and leave the majority of the chalk dust in the mortar cracks.  I have attached a few pics of my factory - in progress.

          The little building in the pics is a hydrocal kit.  For the bricks I left the wall castings white (I didn't seal them as other have suggested) and dry brushed the bricks and wall sections taking extra care not to get any paint into the mortar areas between the bricks and making sure I didn't get any paint into the cracks on the walls. I have fount that with dry brushing less paint is best but you do need to get paint on the bricks and walls.  My final step is to get a thinned out (with water) darker color like burnt umber and apply it to the entire wall - everything.  After you coat the entire wall take a paper towel and gently wipe the wet burnt umber off the walls.  It will fill in the mortar lines and wall cracks with a darker color and it will also darken the original wall and brick colors a bit. I really like the results of this method.

          I hope this info. and the pics are helpful?

          Mike        

                    
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