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Article on Mitochondrial Disease for OT Journal

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  • Embroidery Journal
    I just found this article published in ADVANCE for Occupational Therapy Practicioners, Jan, 8, 2007 issue. The text of the article is below, or you can access
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
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      I just found this article published in ADVANCE for Occupational Therapy Practicioners, Jan, 8, 2007 issue. The text of the article is below, or you can access it online at www.advanceweb.com/ot, I entered mitochondrial in the search window and it came right up. It was very helpful to our OT who mentioned it was recently published. – Suzanne Perryman

      Issue Date: January 08, 2007


        Search Archives

      Vol. 23 •Issue 1 • Page 8
      Sensory Scene

      Treating Children with Mitochondrial Disease

      By Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L

      One to four thousand children in the United States are born every year with some form of mitochondrial disease, and approximately another 400 children will develop some strain of the disease by age 10.

      These children are attending our schools and are increasingly receiving occupational therapy services within the school and clinic settings. It is important to know about this condition so that we can not only treat the child, but educate teachers and parents as well.

      What is mitochondrial disease? A very simplified explanation is that the power source in the cells is impaired, causing failure of the body to transform sugars into cellular energy. Every muscle is filled with mitochondria, which combine sugars or fats with oxygen to produce water and ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the essential energy molecule of all animals, including us!

      When this does not occur properly, many other systems are negatively impacted. Depending on which cells of the body are affected, symptoms may include:

      ·  Poor growth

      ·  Loss of muscle coordination, muscle weakness

      ·  Visual and/or hearing problems

      ·  Developmental delays, learning disabilities

      ·  Mental retardation

      ·  Heart, liver or kidney disease

      ·  Gastrointestinal disorders, severe constipation

      ·  Respiratory disorders

      ·  Diabetes

      ·  Increased risk of infection

      ·  Neurological problems, seizures

      ·  Thyroid dysfunction

      ·  Dementia

      These children often seem to work in "spurts" and then "peter out," becoming lethargic and finding it difficult to concentrate. It is essential to understand that these periods of fatigue are not due to the child "zoning out," but rather total exhaustion from deep within the cellular level of their existence.

      These conditions can directly impact the sensory system's ability to accurately interpret various sensory experiences. This may cause behavioral issues in the form of over- or under-reacting to situations; not being able to quickly respond during a school fire drill; not being able to follow a direction during physical education class; or forgetting something that was just explained. All of these issues can complicate and impede both academic learning and emotional growth.

      As occupational therapists, we are constantly addressing the strength and endurance. We should also be interfacing these abilities with sensory processing for effective treatment interventions. Moreover, applying the concepts we can learn from these children to others that we treat can enhance our quality of care as well as our long-term outcomes.

      Fatigue can cause anyone to become less precise in his or her general functional abilities. This is even truer for the child with mitochondrial disease. Their bodies cannot function as they should, and so they are often referred to occupational therapy.

      An effective treatment plan should teach:

      ·  Energy conservation;

      ·  Body positioning and postural control;

      ·  Stress management and relaxation techniques;

      ·  Fine motor training is essential—often these children have difficulty holding a pencil and cannot keep up with their peers even at the preschool level;

      ·  Visual perceptual training;

      ·  Stimulation of sensory processing and sensory interpretation;

      ·  Task organization, inclusive of, but not limited to, time on/off task; and

      ·  Social skills interventions to help their self-esteem and better understand their actions and reactions.

      Adults interacting with these children need to know that:

      ·  They are not "zoning out;"

      ·  The fatigue is real;

      ·  They need to be sensitive to the child's energy and stress levels;

      ·  Classroom assignments may need to be modified to accommodate the child's endurance;

      ·  There may be times when memory and

      ·  immediate informational processing (following directions) is significantly compromised;

      ·  These deficits often make these children emotionally vulnerable and at risk for low self-esteem; and

      ·  Their skills may seem transient—being able to do something at one time and then not the next.

      Helping children learn to regulate their bodies, understand and anticipate their personal body cycles and rhythms is an essential element in helping all children interpret the world around them.

      There is a lot we can learn from these children with mitochondrial disease. But perhaps the most basic lesson is that without the power to do, we have no power to grow; and we can only grow from what we learn to do.

      Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L, is the author of the book, "Learning RE-Enabled," a guide for parents, teachers and therapists, as well as the CEO/executive director of Children's Special Services, LLC, an occupational therapy service for children with developmental and learning delays in Atlanta, GA. She can be reached through her website at www.childrens-services.com or at sorloffotr@....

      http://occupational-therapy.advanceweb.com/common/EditorialSearch/printerfriendly.aspx?AN=OT_07jan8_otp8.html&AD=01-08-2007   Search Archives

       

      Copyright ©2007 Merion Publications
      2900 Horizon Drive , King of Prussia , PA 19406 • 800-355-5627
      Publishers of ADVANCE Newsmagazines
      www.advanceweb.com



       

       

    • Wendy & Rick
      This is great thanks. I printed it out to give to the diagnostician who is going to evaluate my son for the preschool program for children with diabilities.
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
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        This is great thanks. I printed it out to give to the diagnostician who is going to evaluate my son for the preschool program for children with diabilities.
         
         
        Wendy
        - Hali (6)
        - Zoe (5)
        - Colby (2 1/2) unspecified mito
        - Lily (9 months)
         
        -------Original Message-------
         
        Date: 2/1/2007 1:42:43 PM
        Subject: [Mito] Article on Mitochondrial Disease for OT Journal
         

         

        I just found this article published in ADVANCE for Occupational Therapy Practicioners, Jan, 8, 2007 issue. The text of the article is below, or you can access it online at www.advanceweb.com/ot, I entered mitochondrial in the search window and it came right up. It was very helpful to our OT who mentioned it was recently published. – Suzanne Perryman

        Issue Date: January 08, 2007


          Search Archives

        Vol. 23 •Issue 1 • Page 8
        Sensory Scene

        Treating Children with Mitochondrial Disease

        By Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L

        One to four thousand children in the United States are born every year with some form of mitochondrial disease, and approximately another 400 children will develop some strain of the disease by age 10.

        These children are attending our schools and are increasingly receiving occupational therapy services within the school and clinic settings. It is important to know about this condition so that we can not only treat the child, but educate teachers and parents as well.

        What is mitochondrial disease? A very simplified explanation is that the power source in the cells is impaired, causing failure of the body to transform sugars into cellular energy. Every muscle is filled with mitochondria, which combine sugars or fats with oxygen to produce water and ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the essential energy molecule of all animals, including us!

        When this does not occur properly, many other systems are negatively impacted. Depending on which cells of the body are affected, symptoms may include:

        ·  Poor growth

        ·  Loss of muscle coordination, muscle weakness

        ·  Visual and/or hearing problems

        ·  Developmental delays, learning disabilities

        ·  Mental retardation

        ·  Heart, liver or kidney disease

        ·  Gastrointestinal disorders, severe constipation

        ·  Respiratory disorders

        ·  Diabetes

        ·  Increased risk of infection

        ·  Neurological problems, seizures

        ·  Thyroid dysfunction

        ·  Dementia

        These children often seem to work in "spurts" and then "peter out," becoming lethargic and finding it difficult to concentrate. It is essential to understand that these periods of fatigue are not due to the child "zoning out," but rather total exhaustion from deep within the cellular level of their existence.

        These conditions can directly impact the sensory system's ability to accurately interpret various sensory experiences. This may cause behavioral issues in the form of over- or under-reacting to situations; not being able to quickly respond during a school fire drill; not being able to follow a direction during physical education class; or forgetting something that was just explained. All of these issues can complicate and impede both academic learning and emotional growth.

        As occupational therapists, we are constantly addressing the strength and endurance. We should also be interfacing these abilities with sensory processing for effective treatment interventions. Moreover, applying the concepts we can learn from these children to others that we treat can enhance our quality of care as well as our long-term outcomes.

        Fatigue can cause anyone to become less precise in his or her general functional abilities. This is even truer for the child with mitochondrial disease. Their bodies cannot function as they should, and so they are often referred to occupational therapy.

        An effective treatment plan should teach:

        ·  Energy conservation;

        ·  Body positioning and postural control;

        ·  Stress management and relaxation techniques;

        ·  Fine motor training is essential—often these children have difficulty holding a pencil and cannot keep up with their peers even at the preschool level;

        ·  Visual perceptual training;

        ·  Stimulation of sensory processing and sensory interpretation;

        ·  Task organization, inclusive of, but not limited to, time on/off task; and

        ·  Social skills interventions to help their self-esteem and better understand their actions and reactions.

        Adults interacting with these children need to know that:

        ·  They are not "zoning out;"

        ·  The fatigue is real;

        ·  They need to be sensitive to the child's energy and stress levels;

        ·  Classroom assignments may need to be modified to accommodate the child's endurance;

        ·  There may be times when memory and

        ·  immediate informational processing (following directions) is significantly compromised;

        ·  These deficits often make these children emotionally vulnerable and at risk for low self-esteem; and

        ·  Their skills may seem transient—being able to do something at one time and then not the next.

        Helping children learn to regulate their bodies, understand and anticipate their personal body cycles and rhythms is an essential element in helping all children interpret the world around them.

        There is a lot we can learn from these children with mitochondrial disease. But perhaps the most basic lesson is that without the power to do, we have no power to grow; and we can only grow from what we learn to do.

        Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L, is the author of the book, "Learning RE-Enabled," a guide for parents, teachers and therapists, as well as the CEO/executive director of Children's Special Services, LLC, an occupational therapy service for children with developmental and learning delays in Atlanta, GA. She can be reached through her website at www.childrens-services.com or at sorloffotr@....

        http://occupational-therapy.advanceweb.com/common/EditorialSearch/printerfriendly.aspx?AN=OT_07jan8_otp8.html&AD=01-08-2007   Search Archives

         

        Copyright ©2007 Merion Publications
        2900 Horizon Drive , King of Prussia , PA 19406 • 800-355-5627
        Publishers of ADVANCE Newsmagazines
        www.advanceweb.com



         

         

         
      • Mom2JettandJude
        WONDERFUL article. Thanks so much. ... From: Embroidery Journal To: Mito@yahoogroups.com ; Atalie Legler ; effecticomm@mindspring.com Sent: Thursday,
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
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          WONDERFUL article.  Thanks so much.
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 1:41 PM
          Subject: [Mito] Article on Mitochondrial Disease for OT Journal

          I just found this article published in ADVANCE for Occupational Therapy Practicioners, Jan, 8, 2007 issue. The text of the article is below, or you can access it online at www.advanceweb. com/ot, I entered mitochondrial in the search window and it came right up. It was very helpful to our OT who mentioned it was recently published. – Suzanne Perryman

          Issue Date: January 08, 2007


            Search Archives

          Vol. 23 •Issue 1 • Page 8
          Sensory Scene

          Treating Children with Mitochondrial Disease

          By Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L

          One to four thousand children in the United States are born every year with some form of mitochondrial disease, and approximately another 400 children will develop some strain of the disease by age 10.

          These children are attending our schools and are increasingly receiving occupational therapy services within the school and clinic settings. It is important to know about this condition so that we can not only treat the child, but educate teachers and parents as well.

          What is mitochondrial disease? A very simplified explanation is that the power source in the cells is impaired, causing failure of the body to transform sugars into cellular energy. Every muscle is filled with mitochondria, which combine sugars or fats with oxygen to produce water and ATP (adenosine triphosphate) , the essential energy molecule of all animals, including us!

          When this does not occur properly, many other systems are negatively impacted. Depending on which cells of the body are affected, symptoms may include:

          ·  Poor growth

          ·  Loss of muscle coordination, muscle weakness

          ·  Visual and/or hearing problems

          ·  Developmental delays, learning disabilities

          ·  Mental retardation

          ·  Heart, liver or kidney disease

          ·  Gastrointestinal disorders, severe constipation

          ·  Respiratory disorders

          ·  Diabetes

          ·  Increased risk of infection

          ·  Neurological problems, seizures

          ·  Thyroid dysfunction

          ·  Dementia

          These children often seem to work in "spurts" and then "peter out," becoming lethargic and finding it difficult to concentrate. It is essential to understand that these periods of fatigue are not due to the child "zoning out," but rather total exhaustion from deep within the cellular level of their existence.

          These conditions can directly impact the sensory system's ability to accurately interpret various sensory experiences. This may cause behavioral issues in the form of over- or under-reacting to situations; not being able to quickly respond during a school fire drill; not being able to follow a direction during physical education class; or forgetting something that was just explained. All of these issues can complicate and impede both academic learning and emotional growth.

          As occupational therapists, we are constantly addressing the strength and endurance. We should also be interfacing these abilities with sensory processing for effective treatment interventions. Moreover, applying the concepts we can learn from these children to others that we treat can enhance our quality of care as well as our long-term outcomes.

          Fatigue can cause anyone to become less precise in his or her general functional abilities. This is even truer for the child with mitochondrial disease. Their bodies cannot function as they should, and so they are often referred to occupational therapy.

          An effective treatment plan should teach:

          ·  Energy conservation;

          ·  Body positioning and postural control;

          ·  Stress management and relaxation techniques;

          ·  Fine motor training is essential—often these children have difficulty holding a pencil and cannot keep up with their peers even at the preschool level;

          ·  Visual perceptual training;

          ·  Stimulation of sensory processing and sensory interpretation;

          ·  Task organization, inclusive of, but not limited to, time on/off task; and

          ·  Social skills interventions to help their self-esteem and better understand their actions and reactions.

          Adults interacting with these children need to know that:

          ·  They are not "zoning out;"

          ·  The fatigue is real;

          ·  They need to be sensitive to the child's energy and stress levels;

          ·  Classroom assignments may need to be modified to accommodate the child's endurance;

          ·  There may be times when memory and

          ·  immediate informational processing (following directions) is significantly compromised;

          ·  These deficits often make these children emotionally vulnerable and at risk for low self-esteem; and

          ·  Their skills may seem transient—being able to do something at one time and then not the next.

          Helping children learn to regulate their bodies, understand and anticipate their personal body cycles and rhythms is an essential element in helping all children interpret the world around them.

          There is a lot we can learn from these children with mitochondrial disease. But perhaps the most basic lesson is that without the power to do, we have no power to grow; and we can only grow from what we learn to do.

          Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L, is the author of the book, "Learning RE-Enabled," a guide for parents, teachers and therapists, as well as the CEO/executive director of Children's Special Services, LLC, an occupational therapy service for children with developmental and learning delays in Atlanta, GA. She can be reached through her website at www.childrens- services. com or at sorloffotr@aol. com.

          http://occupational -therapy. advanceweb. com/common/ EditorialSearch/ printerfriendly. aspx?AN=OT_ 07jan8_otp8. html&AD=01-08-2007   Search Archives

          Copyright ©2007 Merion Publications
          2900 Horizon Drive , King of Prussia , PA 19406 • 800-355-5627
          Publishers of ADVANCE Newsmagazines
          www.advanceweb. com




          No virus found in this incoming message.
          Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.17.19/663 - Release Date: 2/1/2007 2:28 PM
        • Jen Clifton
          Thank you for sharing this article. I printed it out to give to Connor s OT. Thanks! Jen -Donny (7) -Mason (5) -Connor (2) Leigh s Syndrome
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
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            Thank you for sharing this article. I printed it out to give to Connor's OT.
            Thanks!
            Jen
            -Donny (7)
            -Mason (5)
            -Connor (2) Leigh's Syndrome
            www.caringbridge.org/visit/connorscott
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 2:41 PM
            Subject: [Mito] Article on Mitochondrial Disease for OT Journal

            I just found this article published in ADVANCE for Occupational Therapy Practicioners, Jan, 8, 2007 issue. The text of the article is below, or you can access it online at www.advanceweb. com/ot, I entered mitochondrial in the search window and it came right up. It was very helpful to our OT who mentioned it was recently published. - Suzanne Perryman

            Issue Date: January 08, 2007


              Search Archives

            Vol. 23 .Issue 1 . Page 8
            Sensory Scene

            Treating Children with Mitochondrial Disease

            By Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L

            One to four thousand children in the United States are born every year with some form of mitochondrial disease, and approximately another 400 children will develop some strain of the disease by age 10.

            These children are attending our schools and are increasingly receiving occupational therapy services within the school and clinic settings. It is important to know about this condition so that we can not only treat the child, but educate teachers and parents as well.

            What is mitochondrial disease? A very simplified explanation is that the power source in the cells is impaired, causing failure of the body to transform sugars into cellular energy. Every muscle is filled with mitochondria, which combine sugars or fats with oxygen to produce water and ATP (adenosine triphosphate) , the essential energy molecule of all animals, including us!

            When this does not occur properly, many other systems are negatively impacted. Depending on which cells of the body are affected, symptoms may include:

            ·  Poor growth

            ·  Loss of muscle coordination, muscle weakness

            ·  Visual and/or hearing problems

            ·  Developmental delays, learning disabilities

            ·  Mental retardation

            ·  Heart, liver or kidney disease

            ·  Gastrointestinal disorders, severe constipation

            ·  Respiratory disorders

            ·  Diabetes

            ·  Increased risk of infection

            ·  Neurological problems, seizures

            ·  Thyroid dysfunction

            ·  Dementia

            These children often seem to work in "spurts" and then "peter out," becoming lethargic and finding it difficult to concentrate. It is essential to understand that these periods of fatigue are not due to the child "zoning out," but rather total exhaustion from deep within the cellular level of their existence.

            These conditions can directly impact the sensory system's ability to accurately interpret various sensory experiences. This may cause behavioral issues in the form of over- or under-reacting to situations; not being able to quickly respond during a school fire drill; not being able to follow a direction during physical education class; or forgetting something that was just explained. All of these issues can complicate and impede both academic learning and emotional growth.

            As occupational therapists, we are constantly addressing the strength and endurance. We should also be interfacing these abilities with sensory processing for effective treatment interventions. Moreover, applying the concepts we can learn from these children to others that we treat can enhance our quality of care as well as our long-term outcomes.

            Fatigue can cause anyone to become less precise in his or her general functional abilities. This is even truer for the child with mitochondrial disease. Their bodies cannot function as they should, and so they are often referred to occupational therapy.

            An effective treatment plan should teach:

            ·  Energy conservation;

            ·  Body positioning and postural control;

            ·  Stress management and relaxation techniques;

            ·  Fine motor training is essential-often these children have difficulty holding a pencil and cannot keep up with their peers even at the preschool level;

            ·  Visual perceptual training;

            ·  Stimulation of sensory processing and sensory interpretation;

            ·  Task organization, inclusive of, but not limited to, time on/off task; and

            ·  Social skills interventions to help their self-esteem and better understand their actions and reactions.

            Adults interacting with these children need to know that:

            ·  They are not "zoning out;"

            ·  The fatigue is real;

            ·  They need to be sensitive to the child's energy and stress levels;

            ·  Classroom assignments may need to be modified to accommodate the child's endurance;

            ·  There may be times when memory and

            ·  immediate informational processing (following directions) is significantly compromised;

            ·  These deficits often make these children emotionally vulnerable and at risk for low self-esteem; and

            ·  Their skills may seem transient-being able to do something at one time and then not the next.

            Helping children learn to regulate their bodies, understand and anticipate their personal body cycles and rhythms is an essential element in helping all children interpret the world around them.

            There is a lot we can learn from these children with mitochondrial disease. But perhaps the most basic lesson is that without the power to do, we have no power to grow; and we can only grow from what we learn to do.

            Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L, is the author of the book, "Learning RE-Enabled," a guide for parents, teachers and therapists, as well as the CEO/executive director of Children's Special Services, LLC, an occupational therapy service for children with developmental and learning delays in Atlanta, GA. She can be reached through her website at www.childrens- services. com or at sorloffotr@aol. com.

            http://occupational -therapy. advanceweb. com/common/ EditorialSearch/ printerfriendly. aspx?AN=OT_ 07jan8_otp8. html&AD=01-08-2007   Search Archives

            Copyright ©2007 Merion Publications
            2900 Horizon Drive , King of Prussia , PA 19406 . 800-355-5627
            Publishers of ADVANCE Newsmagazines
            www.advanceweb. com



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