Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Scientists try to recreate Sago seals for third test blast planned for Friday

Expand Messages
  • USMRA
    Scientists try to recreate Sago seals for third test blast planned for Friday Tuesday, August 01, 2006 By Steve Twedt, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette A third
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2006
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment

      Scientists try to recreate Sago seals for third test blast planned for Friday

      Tuesday, August 01, 2006

      By Steve Twedt, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

      A third experimental blast -- the first to try to replicate conditions at West Virginia's Sago mine where 12 miners died in January -- is scheduled for Friday at the Lake Lynn Laboratory experimental mine in Fayette County.

      This time, scientists will try to recreate both the placement and construction of the seals at Sago.

      The experimental blast is part of a series designed to determine why a methane explosion behind a sealed off portion of the Sago mine destroyed the seal, killing one miner outright and trapping 12 others.

      In particular, investigators will look at whether poor construction or substandard materials contributed to the seal failure, or if the explosion exceeded a force of 20 pounds per square inch, or psi.

      When the seals were built at Sago in December, the federal standard for new seals was 20 psi. On July 19, federal mining officials increased the standard to 50 psi in response to the Jan. 2 explosion at Sago and a May 20 explosion at Kentucky's Darby mine that killed five miners.

      According to a copy of the Test No. 3 Protocol obtained by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Friday's explosion will subject four seals -- two constructed of Omega Block seals in similar fashion to those at Sago -- to both a static and a pressure pulse of about 20 psi.

      To simulate the Sago seals, investigators will apply unmixed mortar on the mine floor, they will not put mortar on vertical joints, and the installation of wood planks and wedges between the Omega Blocks and the mine roof will be slightly different from the approved seal plan.

      Another Omega Block seal, built according to 1992 federal standards, and a concrete seal will be located in crosscuts. One of the Sago Omega block seals also will be built in a crosscut, where the explosion's force will pass by from the side.

      The other Sago Omega Block seal will be in direct line of the explosion, as happened at Sago.

      The testing is being done jointly by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration and the West Virginia Office of Miners' Health, Safety and Training.

      In the first test blast April 15, scientists constructed three seals in the crosscuts, as was done in the original tests. One of the seals was made of 40-inch thick Omega Blocks, the same material used at Sago and Darby. A second seal was made of concrete and the third was a hybrid. Each of the seals withstood a blast force from the side of about 23 pounds per square inch.

      The second blast test, on June 15, included an Omega Block seal built in front of the blast -- and it was obliterated by a force exceeding 50 psi.

      Dirk Fillpot, MSHA spokesman, said the test blasts are expected to continue through the summer.

      ___________________________________________________________
      United States Mine Rescue Association
      www.usmra.com
       
       
    • BKBelle
      FYI--South African Coal research bkb South Africa ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2006
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        FYI--South African Coal research

        bkb
        South Africa

        --- USMRA <usmra@...> wrote:

        > Scientists try to recreate Sago seals for third test
        > blast planned for Friday
        > Tuesday, August 01, 2006
        >
        > By Steve Twedt, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
        >
        >
        >
        > A third experimental blast -- the first to try to
        > replicate conditions at West Virginia's Sago mine
        > where 12 miners died in January -- is scheduled for
        > Friday at the Lake Lynn Laboratory experimental mine
        > in Fayette County.
        >
        > This time, scientists will try to recreate both the
        > placement and construction of the seals at Sago.
        >
        > The experimental blast is part of a series designed
        > to determine why a methane explosion behind a sealed
        > off portion of the Sago mine destroyed the seal,
        > killing one miner outright and trapping 12 others.
        >
        > In particular, investigators will look at whether
        > poor construction or substandard materials
        > contributed to the seal failure, or if the explosion
        > exceeded a force of 20 pounds per square inch, or
        > psi.
        >
        > When the seals were built at Sago in December, the
        > federal standard for new seals was 20 psi. On July
        > 19, federal mining officials increased the standard
        > to 50 psi in response to the Jan. 2 explosion at
        > Sago and a May 20 explosion at Kentucky's Darby mine
        > that killed five miners.
        >
        > According to a copy of the Test No. 3 Protocol
        > obtained by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Friday's
        > explosion will subject four seals -- two constructed
        > of Omega Block seals in similar fashion to those at
        > Sago -- to both a static and a pressure pulse of
        > about 20 psi.
        >
        > To simulate the Sago seals, investigators will apply
        > unmixed mortar on the mine floor, they will not put
        > mortar on vertical joints, and the installation of
        > wood planks and wedges between the Omega Blocks and
        > the mine roof will be slightly different from the
        > approved seal plan.
        >
        > Another Omega Block seal, built according to 1992
        > federal standards, and a concrete seal will be
        > located in crosscuts. One of the Sago Omega block
        > seals also will be built in a crosscut, where the
        > explosion's force will pass by from the side.
        >
        > The other Sago Omega Block seal will be in direct
        > line of the explosion, as happened at Sago.
        >
        > The testing is being done jointly by the National
        > Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, the
        > federal Mine Safety and Health Administration and
        > the West Virginia Office of Miners' Health, Safety
        > and Training.
        >
        > In the first test blast April 15, scientists
        > constructed three seals in the crosscuts, as was
        > done in the original tests. One of the seals was
        > made of 40-inch thick Omega Blocks, the same
        > material used at Sago and Darby. A second seal was
        > made of concrete and the third was a hybrid. Each of
        > the seals withstood a blast force from the side of
        > about 23 pounds per square inch.
        >
        > The second blast test, on June 15, included an Omega
        > Block seal built in front of the blast -- and it was
        > obliterated by a force exceeding 50 psi.
        >
        > Dirk Fillpot, MSHA spokesman, said the test blasts
        > are expected to continue through the summer.
        >
        >
        ___________________________________________________________
        > United States Mine Rescue Association
        > www.usmra.com
        >
        >


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Rob McGee
        For the benefit of those that don t read sign, huh? Rocky
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 1, 2006
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          For the benefit of those that don't read sign, huh?

          Rocky
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.