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Stanko Blatnik in Tuzla?

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  • Andrius Kulikauskas
    Stanko, Thank you for your letter. Are you in Tuzla, Bosnia? I am here today and also Friday, teaching mathematics. It would be great to meet. My telephone is
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 3, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Stanko,

      Thank you for your letter. Are you in Tuzla, Bosnia? I am here today and
      also Friday, teaching mathematics. It would be great to meet. My telephone
      is 0623 82131 I am at the American University.

      Andrius Kulikauskas
      ms@...

      > Dear Franz,
      >
      > I really do not to discuss to much, but I wanted to point some elements
      > which I found important.
      >
      > 1) concerning science: it did not give answers to many problems because it
      > became bureaucratic. Look at calls and application forms. There are so
      > many unimportant things you have to write to get money-usually one year
      > after proposal was sent. Such approach supports some para-governmental
      > organizations which are helping to prepare proposals, reports and are
      > lobbying in the centres of power (our Institute could nicely live writing
      > proposals for others). The project are report and not result oriented. I
      > wrote some time ago that Einstein could not get any money for his work in
      > relativity because he had not any reference and there was not European
      > dimension in his research.
      >
      > The way out is to try to make step backwards to see how science was
      > working at the begin of 20 century when best people were sitting together
      > at Solvay congresses trying to solve the problems of quantum mechanics.
      > I could write a lot about it. Maybe we will try to start different type of
      > on-line scientific journals???
      > Anyway we have to go out of the Apply or Die! and Publish or Perish!
      > paradigms.
      >
      > 2) concerning local manufacturing
      > I spent a part of my career in manufacturing organizations. It is not so
      > simple. I believe only in "saving economy" where we are trying to consume
      > less of material goods and spend more of "spiritual goods". We have to go
      > out of "fordism" which caused 1929 crisis and is cause of present one.
      >
      > 3) about global village
      > As Florida said the world is not flat, the geography is extremely
      > important. 48 locations (with 18% of world population) in the world
      > produce 2/3 of wealth, 9 from 10 innovations came from these locations.
      > So what could do we who are not in Silicon Valley or Shanghai? Here I
      > believe telematics is solution and open source approach is solution. In
      > October we had eFest at Velenje (www.efest.si). We had speakers form
      > Silicon Valley to Moscow, most of them were online, or sent video or some
      > other type of presentation. It works perfectly (with some technical
      > problems of course). For me most important experience from this event was
      > that it is possible to organize such event (two weeks of events) in few
      > weeks. That all people invited were working hard to prepare its
      > presentation and nobody did not ask for any compensation. As president
      > Truman said: "It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who
      > gets the credit."
      > And that is the way out for us who do not live and work in 48 most
      > productive regions on the world.
      > To network with regions similar to ours and some of the most productive
      > regions. To liberate creative potentials of all inhabitants of region and
      > provide the basis of sustainable development.
      > The only problem is that we have not to much time.
      >
      > Stanko
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Franz Nahrada <f.nahrada@...>
      > To: minciu_sodas_en@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sunday, November 2, 2008 11:25:27 AM
      > Subject: [minciu_sodas_en] Margaret Wertheim on Knowing Everything
      >
      >
      > One of the most interesting articles I recently read was this piece from
      > Edge magazines "World Question Center" 2005. Especially in the light of
      > the rightful aspiration to "know everything and apply it usefully".
      >
      > MARGARET WERTHEIM
      > Science writer and Commentator; Author, Pythagoras' Trousers
      >
      > http://www.edge org/q2005/ q05_4.html
      >
      > "For the past few decades theoretical physicists have been searching for a
      > so-called "Theory of Everything," what Nobel laureate Stephen Weinberg has
      > also called a "Final Theory." This "ultimate" set of equations that would
      > tie together all the fundamental forces which physicists recognize
      > today—the four essential powers of gravity, electromagnetism, and the
      > nuclear forces inside the cores of atoms. But such theory—if we are lucky
      > enough to extract it from the current mass of competing contenders—would
      > not tell us anything about how proteins form or how DNA came into being.
      > Less still would it illuminate the machinations of a living cell, or the
      > workings of the human mind. Frankly, a "theory of everything" would not
      > even help us to understand how snowflakes form."
      >
      > "Knowing Everything" might have a different meaning, and that is what I
      > would like to provoque. Maybe in Margaret Wertheims own words?
      >
      > "Some years ago the science writer John Horgan wrote a marvelously
      > provocative book in which he suggested that science was coming to an end,
      > all the major theoretical edifices now supposedly being in place. Horgan
      > was right in one sense, for high-energy physics may be on the verge of
      > achieving its final unification. But in so many other areas, science is
      > just beginning. Only now are we acquiring the scientific tools and
      > techniques to begin to investigate how our atmosphere works, how
      > ecological systems function, how genes create proteins, how cells evolve,
      > and how brains work. The very success of "fundamental science" has opened
      > doors undreamed of by earlier generations and in many ways it seems there
      > is more than ever that we do not know. At a time when journals tout
      > theories about how to create entire universes it is easy to imagine that
      > science has grasped the whole of reality. In truth our ignorance is
      > vast—and personally I believe it will always be so. "
      >
      > "Nicholas of Cusa insists we can know a great deal and that science and
      > mathematics will take our knowledge forward. Our ignorance then can be
      > ever more learned. Not omniscience then, but an ever more subtle and
      > insightful unknowing is the goal that Cusa advocated."
      >
      > Franz
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


      --
      Minciu Sodas
      http://www.ms.lt
      ms@...
      +1 312 618 3345
    • Blatnik Stanko
      Andrius, I have a lot of troubles at Velenje (financial problem at Instittue), so I am not sure when I will come to Tuzla. I will inform you on time. Stanko
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 3, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Andrius,
         
         I have a lot of troubles at Velenje (financial problem at Instittue), so I am not sure when I will come to Tuzla. I will inform you on time.

        Stanko


        From: Andrius Kulikauskas <ms@...>
        To: minciu_sodas_BOS@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: minciu_sodas_EN@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, November 4, 2008 8:00:23 AM
        Subject: [Minciu_Sodas_BOS] Stanko Blatnik in Tuzla?

        Stanko,

        Thank you for your letter. Are you in Tuzla, Bosnia? I am here today and
        also Friday, teaching mathematics. It would be great to meet. My telephone
        is 0623 82131 I am at the American University.

        Andrius Kulikauskas
        ms@...

        > Dear Franz,
        >
        > I really do not to discuss to much, but I wanted to point some elements
        > which I found important.
        >
        > 1) concerning science: it did not give answers to many problems because it
        > became bureaucratic. Look at calls and application forms. There are so
        > many unimportant things you have to write to get money-usually one year
        > after proposal was sent. Such approach supports some para-governmental
        > organizations which are helping to prepare proposals, reports and are
        > lobbying in the centres of power (our Institute could nicely live writing
        > proposals for others). The project are report and not result oriented. I
        > wrote some time ago that Einstein could not get any money for his work in
        > relativity because he had not any reference and there was not European
        > dimension in his research.
        >
        > The way out is to try to make step backwards to see how science was
        > working at the begin of 20 century when best people were sitting together
        > at Solvay congresses trying to solve the problems of quantum mechanics.
        > I could write a lot about it. Maybe we will try to start different type of
        > on-line scientific journals???
        > Anyway we have to go out of the Apply or Die! and Publish or Perish!
        > paradigms.
        >
        > 2) concerning local manufacturing
        > I spent a part of my career in manufacturing organizations. It is not so
        > simple. I believe only in "saving economy" where we are trying to consume
        > less of material goods and spend more of "spiritual goods". We have to go
        > out of "fordism" which caused 1929 crisis and is cause of present one.
        >
        > 3) about global village
        > As Florida said the world is not flat, the geography is extremely
        > important. 48 locations (with 18% of world population) in the world
        > produce 2/3 of wealth, 9 from 10 innovations came from these locations.
        > So what could do we who are not in Silicon Valley or Shanghai? Here I
        > believe telematics is solution and open source approach is solution. In
        > October we had eFest at Velenje (www.efest.si) . We had speakers form
        > Silicon Valley to Moscow, most of them were online, or sent video or some
        > other type of presentation. It works perfectly (with some technical
        > problems of course). For me most important experience from this event was
        > that it is possible to organize such event (two weeks of events) in few
        > weeks. That all people invited were working hard to prepare its
        > presentation and nobody did not ask for any compensation. As president
        > Truman said: "It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who
        > gets the credit."
        > And that is the way out for us who do not live and work in 48 most
        > productive regions on the world.
        > To network with regions similar to ours and some of the most productive
        > regions. To liberate creative potentials of all inhabitants of region and
        > provide the basis of sustainable development.
        > The only problem is that we have not to much time.
        >
        > Stanko
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ____________ _________ _________ __
        > From: Franz Nahrada <f.nahrada@reflex. at>
        > To: minciu_sodas_ en@yahoogroups. com
        > Sent: Sunday, November 2, 2008 11:25:27 AM
        > Subject: [minciu_sodas_ en] Margaret Wertheim on Knowing Everything
        >
        >
        > One of the most interesting articles I recently read was this piece from
        > Edge magazines "World Question Center" 2005. Especially in the light of
        > the rightful aspiration to "know everything and apply it usefully".
        >
        > MARGARET WERTHEIM
        > Science writer and Commentator; Author, Pythagoras' Trousers
        >
        > http://www.edge. org/q2005/ q05_4.html
        >
        > "For the past few decades theoretical physicists have been searching for a
        > so-called "Theory of Everything," what Nobel laureate Stephen Weinberg has
        > also called a "Final Theory." This "ultimate" set of equations that would
        > tie together all the fundamental forces which physicists recognize
        > today—the four essential powers of gravity, electromagnetism, and the
        > nuclear forces inside the cores of atoms. But such theory—if we are lucky
        > enough to extract it from the current mass of competing contenders—would
        > not tell us anything about how proteins form or how DNA came into being.
        > Less still would it illuminate the machinations of a living cell, or the
        > workings of the human mind. Frankly, a "theory of everything" would not
        > even help us to understand how snowflakes form."
        >
        > "Knowing Everything" might have a different meaning, and that is what I
        > would like to provoque. Maybe in Margaret Wertheims own words?
        >
        > "Some years ago the science writer John Horgan wrote a marvelously
        > provocative book in which he suggested that science was coming to an end,
        > all the major theoretical edifices now supposedly being in place. Horgan
        > was right in one sense, for high-energy physics may be on the verge of
        > achieving its final unification. But in so many other areas, science is
        > just beginning. Only now are we acquiring the scientific tools and
        > techniques to begin to investigate how our atmosphere works, how
        > ecological systems function, how genes create proteins, how cells evolve,
        > and how brains work. The very success of "fundamental science" has opened
        > doors undreamed of by earlier generations and in many ways it seems there
        > is more than ever that we do not know. At a time when journals tout
        > theories about how to create entire universes it is easy to imagine that
        > science has grasped the whole of reality. In truth our ignorance is
        > vast—and personally I believe it will always be so. "
        >
        > "Nicholas of Cusa insists we can know a great deal and that science and
        > mathematics will take our knowledge forward. Our ignorance then can be
        > ever more learned. Not omniscience then, but an ever more subtle and
        > insightful unknowing is the goal that Cusa advocated."
        >
        > Franz
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

        --
        Minciu Sodas
        http://www.ms. lt
        ms@...
        +1 312 618 3345


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