Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: 1926 Irish Censuses

Expand Messages
  • Linda Holley
    Liam, Good to hear your input. Linda
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 27, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Liam,

      Good to hear your input.

      Linda
      --- In Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com, "L.G. McF" <larneman@...> wrote:
      >
      > While I agree with 99% of what you wrote, Elwyn, the last sentence is not
      > what I was told many, many years ago.
      >
      > According to my information the 1926 N. Ireland census was badly damaged
      > during the Blitz of Belfast in Second World War.
      >
      > The same thing happened with many records of soldiers who served in WW1 in
      > England.
      >
      > They have been working for years restoring or recovering those water
      > damaged records.
      >
      > I was told that this was the intention for 1926 N. Ireland census,
      > to restore or recover water damaged records.
      >
      > They may now have been pulped but I am assuming due to War damage.
      >
      > I am only writing this because so many other censuses were pulped to
      > support the First World War effort.
      >
      > I cannot understand any need since that.
      >
      >
      > On Sat, Apr 27, 2013 at 9:58 AM, elwynsoutter <elwynsoutter@...>wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Here's a little information on the 1926 Irish census which I found on
      > > another site and which you may find interesting (if also disappointing).
      > > There had been an announcement in the Dail (Irish parliament) a year or so
      > > ago, that the 1926 census was to be released soon. There's been a change of
      > > mind, presumably based on legal advice.
      > >
      > > 1926 census information will not be made public until 2026. The 1926 census
      > > was held under the Statistics Act 1926 which meant that all information
      > > collected was purely for statistical purposes and could not be divulged to
      > > any person or organisation.
      > >
      > > The Act was subsequently repealed by the 1993 Statistics Act. One of the
      > > provisions of the 1993 Act was that the guarantee of confidentiality would
      > > be lifted in the case of information provided for the census after 100
      > > years.
      > >
      > > The Act had retrospective effect which implies that the records from the
      > > 1926 census are confidential until 2026 - 100 years after the census.
      > >
      > > Census Enquiries Section,
      > > Central Statistics Office,
      > > Swords Business Campus,
      > > Balheary Road,
      > > Swords,
      > > Co. Dublin
      > >
      > > Note: For those not familiar with the background, whilst the rest of the
      > > UK had a census in 1921, civil disorder in Ireland made taking a census
      > > there impractical. It was 1926 before it could be taken, in both the Irish
      > > Free State as it then was, as well as in Northern Ireland. The part
      > > covering what is now the Republic of Ireland is safe, but obviously won't
      > > be accessible for another 13 years. Unfortunately the part for Northern
      > > Ireland was pulped for spare paper, and so is lost.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • larnemanmid
      Hi Elwyn, According to this you are only quoting the PRONI official line told in March 2013. My version dates back to the mid-1980 s when I was actively
      Message 2 of 5 , May 10, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Elwyn,

        According to this you are only quoting the PRONI official line told in March 2013. My version dates back to the mid-1980's when I was actively researching in the London, Dublin and Belfast Record Archives.
        The result is the same, again only water damaged paper or "PULP"

        FRIDAY, 10 MAY 2013
        Northern Irish 1926 census records destroyed in WW2

        You know how good the Irish record on census preservation is? Well, it gets worse...

        I'm looking at the minutes for the recent user group meeting at PRONI (www.proni.gov.uk) on March 22nd, which I was sadly unable to attend due to the bad snow that hit us. Several items were discussed at the meeting, including a demonstration of the new valuation revision books now online, but one item stands out, concerning the 1926 census. Following the previous meeting in December I had informally asked about the 1926 Northern Irish census, which was recorded on the same night as the equivalent in the Irish Free State, and any possibility of release, and was told that there were 'issues' with this - unlike the equivalent census for the Republic which is likely to see a release in the near future.

        In the March meeting, the issue was raised formally within the proceedings by the North of Ireland Family History Society (www.nifhs.org) - and the definitive response from PRONI is that the 1926 Northern Irish census was pulped in the Second World War.

        *Sigh*

        Weeping and gnashing of teeth won't do much to change the situation, but it breaks my heart to hear yet another example of Ireland's historic record failing to survive the past. It's not all doom and gloom - the 1937 census for Northern Ireland has survived and is secure (though currently closed to access), and the 1939 National Register for Northern Ireland is currently available from PRONI, accessible via a Freedom of Information Act.

        Other news from PRONI - the Name Search database on the website is to be extended with additional material; a new digital preservation team is up and running at PRONI, tasked with delivering a digital repository for 2014; and 15,000 new entries were added to the catalogue in 2012-13, including photographs, leases and wills - there are certain priorities on the cataloguing front just now, inclusing the De Lacherois estate papers which date from 1617 – 1930's, and papers of the Cochranes of Redcastle, Co. Donegal.

        (With thanks to Gavin McMahon)

        Historian, author and tutor Chris Paton

        --- In Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com, "Linda Holley" <ljholley@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Liam,
        >
        > Good to hear your input.
        >
        > Linda
        > --- In Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com, "L.G. McF" <larneman@> wrote:
        > >
        > > While I agree with 99% of what you wrote, Elwyn, the last sentence is not
        > > what I was told many, many years ago.
        > >
        > > According to my information the 1926 N. Ireland census was badly damaged
        > > during the Blitz of Belfast in Second World War.
        > >
        > > The same thing happened with many records of soldiers who served in WW1 in
        > > England.
        > >
        > > They have been working for years restoring or recovering those water
        > > damaged records.
        > >
        > > I was told that this was the intention for 1926 N. Ireland census,
        > > to restore or recover water damaged records.
        > >
        > > They may now have been pulped but I am assuming due to War damage.
        > >
        > > I am only writing this because so many other censuses were pulped to
        > > support the First World War effort.
        > >
        > > I cannot understand any need since that.
        > >
        > >
        > > On Sat, Apr 27, 2013 at 9:58 AM, elwynsoutter <elwynsoutter@>wrote:
        > >
        > > > **
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Here's a little information on the 1926 Irish census which I found on
        > > > another site and which you may find interesting (if also disappointing).
        > > > There had been an announcement in the Dail (Irish parliament) a year or so
        > > > ago, that the 1926 census was to be released soon. There's been a change of
        > > > mind, presumably based on legal advice.
        > > >
        > > > 1926 census information will not be made public until 2026. The 1926 census
        > > > was held under the Statistics Act 1926 which meant that all information
        > > > collected was purely for statistical purposes and could not be divulged to
        > > > any person or organisation.
        > > >
        > > > The Act was subsequently repealed by the 1993 Statistics Act. One of the
        > > > provisions of the 1993 Act was that the guarantee of confidentiality would
        > > > be lifted in the case of information provided for the census after 100
        > > > years.
        > > >
        > > > The Act had retrospective effect which implies that the records from the
        > > > 1926 census are confidential until 2026 - 100 years after the census.
        > > >
        > > > Census Enquiries Section,
        > > > Central Statistics Office,
        > > > Swords Business Campus,
        > > > Balheary Road,
        > > > Swords,
        > > > Co. Dublin
        > > >
        > > > Note: For those not familiar with the background, whilst the rest of the
        > > > UK had a census in 1921, civil disorder in Ireland made taking a census
        > > > there impractical. It was 1926 before it could be taken, in both the Irish
        > > > Free State as it then was, as well as in Northern Ireland. The part
        > > > covering what is now the Republic of Ireland is safe, but obviously won't
        > > > be accessible for another 13 years. Unfortunately the part for Northern
        > > > Ireland was pulped for spare paper, and so is lost.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Elwyn Soutter
        Liam,   Thanks for that. My source was PRONI but, as you have said before, you can never be 100% sure about some aspects of Irish records. You had raised my
        Message 3 of 5 , May 12, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Liam,
           
          Thanks for that. My source was PRONI but, as you have said before, you can never be 100% sure about some aspects of Irish records. You had raised my hopes a bit, but it seems it’s not to be!
           
          Interesting about the next information to be added to the PRONI database. The PRONI staff have mentioned to me that they hope to put a lot more wills on,  next year, covering 1900 – 1943, or even beyond, so that will be very helpful. There are actually some wills for that period already on their database, particularly for around 1920. I am not sure why they are there when say 1905 is not. No doubt there is a reason.
           
          Elwyn


          From: larnemanmid <larneman@...>
          To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, 10 May 2013, 19:59
          Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Re: 1926 Irish Censuses

           
          Hi Elwyn,

          According to this you are only quoting the PRONI official line told in March 2013. My version dates back to the mid-1980's when I was actively researching in the London, Dublin and Belfast Record Archives.
          The result is the same, again only water damaged paper or "PULP"

          FRIDAY, 10 MAY 2013
          Northern Irish 1926 census records destroyed in WW2

          You know how good the Irish record on census preservation is? Well, it gets worse...

          I'm looking at the minutes for the recent user group meeting at PRONI (www.proni.gov.uk) on March 22nd, which I was sadly unable to attend due to the bad snow that hit us. Several items were discussed at the meeting, including a demonstration of the new valuation revision books now online, but one item stands out, concerning the 1926 census. Following the previous meeting in December I had informally asked about the 1926 Northern Irish census, which was recorded on the same night as the equivalent in the Irish Free State, and any possibility of release, and was told that there were 'issues' with this - unlike the equivalent census for the Republic which is likely to see a release in the near future.

          In the March meeting, the issue was raised formally within the proceedings by the North of Ireland Family History Society (www.nifhs.org) - and the definitive response from PRONI is that the 1926 Northern Irish census was pulped in the Second World War.

          *Sigh*

          Weeping and gnashing of teeth won't do much to change the situation, but it breaks my heart to hear yet another example of Ireland's historic record failing to survive the past. It's not all doom and gloom - the 1937 census for Northern Ireland has survived and is secure (though currently closed to access), and the 1939 National Register for Northern Ireland is currently available from PRONI, accessible via a Freedom of Information Act.

          Other news from PRONI - the Name Search database on the website is to be extended with additional material; a new digital preservation team is up and running at PRONI, tasked with delivering a digital repository for 2014; and 15,000 new entries were added to the catalogue in 2012-13, including photographs, leases and wills - there are certain priorities on the cataloguing front just now, inclusing the De Lacherois estate papers which date from 1617 – 1930's, and papers of the Cochranes of Redcastle, Co. Donegal.

          (With thanks to Gavin McMahon)

          Historian, author and tutor Chris Paton

          --- In Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com, "Linda Holley" <ljholley@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Liam,
          >
          > Good to hear your input.
          >
          > Linda
          > --- In Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com, "L.G. McF" <larneman@> wrote:
          > >
          > > While I agree with 99% of what you wrote, Elwyn, the last sentence is not
          > > what I was told many, many years ago.
          > >
          > > According to my information the 1926 N. Ireland census was badly damaged
          > > during the Blitz of Belfast in Second World War.
          > >
          > > The same thing happened with many records of soldiers who served in WW1 in
          > > England.
          > >
          > > They have been working for years restoring or recovering those water
          > > damaged records.
          > >
          > > I was told that this was the intention for 1926 N. Ireland census,
          > > to restore or recover water damaged records.
          > >
          > > They may now have been pulped but I am assuming due to War damage.
          > >
          > > I am only writing this because so many other censuses were pulped to
          > > support the First World War effort.
          > >
          > > I cannot understand any need since that.
          > >
          > >
          > > On Sat, Apr 27, 2013 at 9:58 AM, elwynsoutter <elwynsoutter@>wrote:
          > >
          > > > **
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Here's a little information on the 1926 Irish census which I found on
          > > > another site and which you may find interesting (if also disappointing).
          > > > There had been an announcement in the Dail (Irish parliament) a year or so
          > > > ago, that the 1926 census was to be released soon. There's been a change of
          > > > mind, presumably based on legal advice.
          > > >
          > > > 1926 census information will not be made public until 2026. The 1926 census
          > > > was held under the Statistics Act 1926 which meant that all information
          > > > collected was purely for statistical purposes and could not be divulged to
          > > > any person or organisation.
          > > >
          > > > The Act was subsequently repealed by the 1993 Statistics Act. One of the
          > > > provisions of the 1993 Act was that the guarantee of confidentiality would
          > > > be lifted in the case of information provided for the census after 100
          > > > years.
          > > >
          > > > The Act had retrospective effect which implies that the records from the
          > > > 1926 census are confidential until 2026 - 100 years after the census.
          > > >
          > > > Census Enquiries Section,
          > > > Central Statistics Office,
          > > > Swords Business Campus,
          > > > Balheary Road,
          > > > Swords,
          > > > Co. Dublin
          > > >
          > > > Note: For those not familiar with the background, whilst the rest of the
          > > > UK had a census in 1921, civil disorder in Ireland made taking a census
          > > > there impractical. It was 1926 before it could be taken, in both the Irish
          > > > Free State as it then was, as well as in Northern Ireland. The part
          > > > covering what is now the Republic of Ireland is safe, but obviously won't
          > > > be accessible for another 13 years. Unfortunately the part for Northern
          > > > Ireland was pulped for spare paper, and so is lost.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >



        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.