Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

Expand Messages
  • Deborah Adles
    Hi All I got a copy of Carleton s Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. What does
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 4, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi All

      I got a copy of Carleton's Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. 

      What does this mean?  that there were none in Antrim in 1660s?  My earliest known is William Kernahan, teacher in Antrim and deceased at time of son Samuel Kernaghan's wedding in 1845 in Craigs near Ballymena.  I have no birth or death info on him.  Where do I go from here? 

      Thank you for any help or direction

      Deborah Kernohan

      Florida, USA
    • Elwyn Soutter
      Deborah, I think the problem is finding the right spelling. The version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls on the Macafee site has the following KERNOGHAN/KERNAGHAN
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 4, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Deborah,

        I think the problem is finding the right spelling. The version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls on the Macafee site has the following KERNOGHAN/KERNAGHAN entries:
         
        2 Carnickan in Fernissey townland
        1 Carnegan in Ballyreagh
        1 Carnekan in Clough
        1 Carneckan in Kinflea
        2 Carnigan in Ballymena
        1 Carnagan in Taylorstown
         
         
        Were the family still in Craigs townland in 1851? If so, the census for that townland has survived. Check it on Liam’s site:
         
        http://irishgenealogy.net/cp/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=34&t=367&sid=417128fec1a72538f0afa1cad799dff7
         
        Getting back earlier than you are can be very difficult. The first area to explore is church records. If you know your ancestors exact denomination, you should check out all the relevant churches in the area. If they were Presbyterian, and you don’t know which church they attended, there are quite a few churches in the area to choose from  (4 Presbyterian in Ballymena, plus 1 Non subscribing and one Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). They might also have gone to church in Cullybackey, where there is 1 Presbyterian and 1 Covenanter). Presbyterians in Ireland don’t follow the parish system and so which church you attended was essentially a matter of personal preference.
         
        Most (but not all) of these church records have been microfilmed and are held at PRONI, Belfast. As far as I am aware, none are on-line. The records for the first 100 years of the Cullybackey Presbyterian church (Cunningham memorial) are in the Presbyterian Historical Society, Belfast. In a wee blue book.
         
        Tradition was to marry in the bride’s church, so the church that the 1845 took place in may be her church rather than his, assuming hey attended different churches.


        Check the following site for graves:

        www.thebraid.com/genealogy.aspx

        Note that if you do find a grave, it doesn't necessarily mean the person attended that church. Many Presbyterians were buried in Church of Ireland graveyards for historical reasons I won't bore you with here. Some churches didn't have graveyards. An example is Cullybackey Presbyterian. Many of their congregation are therefore buried in
        the RP (Covenanter) graveyard instead.
         
        Check the PRONI website for any wills and other documents for your family:
         
         
        Check the Findmypast.ie site for any record of them. A lot of land in the Craigs area was sold through the Encumbered Estates Court around 1850, and inventories of the tenants and their leases were drawn up at that time, sometimes with useful details of other members of their family. Check that site out., You can search the indexes free. If you get a possible match, ask Linda if she will assist you with a free look up. (She has a subscription).
         
         
        There are other more obscure checks you can do, but hopefully this will keep you busy for a little.
         
         
        Elwyn


        From: Deborah Adles <dadles@...>
        To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 15:21
        Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

         
        Hi All

        I got a copy of Carleton's Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. 

        What does this mean?  that there were none in Antrim in 1660s?  My earliest known is William Kernahan, teacher in Antrim and deceased at time of son Samuel Kernaghan's wedding in 1845 in Craigs near Ballymena.  I have no birth or death info on him.  Where do I go from here? 

        Thank you for any help or direction

        Deborah Kernohan

        Florida, USA


      • Linda Holley
        Great advice - as always!!! Linda
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 4, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Great advice - as always!!!

          Linda

          --- In Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com, Elwyn Soutter <elwynsoutter@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Deborah,
          >
          >
          > I think the problem is finding the right
          > spelling. The version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls on the Macafee site has the
          > following KERNOGHAN/KERNAGHAN entries:
          >  
          > 2 Carnickan in Fernissey townland
          > 1 Carnegan in Ballyreagh
          > 1 Carnekan in Clough
          > 1 Carneckan in Kinflea
          > 2 Carnigan in Ballymena
          > 1 Carnagan in Taylorstown
          >  
          > http://www.billmacafee.com/1660shearthmoneyrolls.htm
          >  
          > Were the family still in Craigs townland in
          > 1851? If so, the census for that townland has survived. Check it on Liam’s
          > site:
          >  
          > http://irishgenealogy.net/cp/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=34&t=367&sid=417128fec1a72538f0afa1cad799dff7
          >  
          > Getting back earlier than you are can be
          > very difficult. The first area to explore is church records. If you know your
          > ancestors exact denomination, you should check out all the relevant churches in
          > the area. If they were Presbyterian, and you don’t know which church they
          > attended, there are quite a few churches in the area to choose from  (4 Presbyterian in Ballymena, plus 1 Non
          > subscribing and one Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). They might also have
          > gone to church in Cullybackey, where there is 1 Presbyterian and 1 Covenanter).
          > Presbyterians in Ireland don’t follow the parish system and so which church you
          > attended was essentially a matter of personal preference.
          >  
          > Most (but not all) of these church records
          > have been microfilmed and are held at PRONI, Belfast. As far as I am aware,
          > none are on-line. The records for the first 100 years of the Cullybackey
          > Presbyterian church (Cunningham memorial) are in the Presbyterian Historical
          > Society, Belfast. In a wee blue book.
          >  
          > Tradition was to marry in the bride’s
          > church, so the church that the 1845 took place in may be her church rather than
          > his, assuming hey attended different churches.
          >
          >
          > Check the following site for graves:
          >
          > www.thebraid.com/genealogy.aspx
          >
          > Note that if you do find a grave, it doesn't necessarily mean the person attended that church. Many Presbyterians were buried in Church of Ireland graveyards for historical reasons I won't bore you with here. Some churches didn't have graveyards. An example is Cullybackey Presbyterian. Many of their congregation are therefore buried in
          > the RP (Covenanter) graveyard instead.
          >
          >  
          > Check the PRONI website for any wills and
          > other documents for your family:
          >  
          > http://applications.proni.gov.uk/DCAL_PRONI_ProniNames/SearchPage.aspx
          >  
          > Check the Findmypast.ie site for any record
          > of them. A lot of land in the Craigs area was sold through the Encumbered
          > Estates Court around 1850, and inventories of the tenants and their leases were
          > drawn up at that time, sometimes with useful details of other members of their
          > family. Check that site out., You can search the indexes free. If you get a
          > possible match, ask Linda if she will assist you with a free look up. (She has
          > a subscription).
          >  
          > http://www.findmypast.ie/account/home
          >  
          > There are other more obscure checks you can
          > do, but hopefully this will keep you busy for a little.
          >  
          >  
          > Elwyn
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Deborah Adles <dadles@...>
          > To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 15:21
          > Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans
          >
          >
          >  
          > Hi All
          >
          > I got a copy of Carleton's Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. 
          >
          > What does this mean?  that there were none in Antrim in 1660s?  My earliest known is William Kernahan, teacher in Antrim and deceased at time of son Samuel Kernaghan's wedding in 1845 in Craigs near Ballymena.  I have no birth or death info on him.  Where do I go from here? 
          >
          > Thank you for any help or direction
          >
          > Deborah Kernohan
          >
          > Florida, USA
          >
        • Gordon Crooks
          Elwin: What version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls was used ? The best is S. T. Carleton s book on the hearth rolls. Gordon ... From: Linda Holley To:
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 4, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Elwin: What version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls was used ? The best is S. T. Carleton's book on the hearth rolls.
             
                                          Gordon
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 11:16 AM
            Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Re: Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

             

            Great advice - as always!!!

            Linda

            --- In Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com, Elwyn Soutter <elwynsoutter@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Deborah,
            >
            >
            > I think the problem is finding the right
            > spelling. The version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls on the Macafee site has the
            > following KERNOGHAN/KERNAGHAN entries:
            >  
            > 2 Carnickan in Fernissey townland
            > 1 Carnegan in Ballyreagh
            > 1 Carnekan in Clough
            > 1 Carneckan in Kinflea
            > 2 Carnigan in Ballymena
            > 1 Carnagan in Taylorstown
            >  
            > http://www.billmacafee.com/1660shearthmoneyrolls.htm
            >  
            > Were the family still in Craigs townland in
            > 1851? If so, the census for that townland has survived. Check it on Liam’s
            > site:
            >  
            > http://irishgenealogy.net/cp/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=34&t=367&sid=417128fec1a72538f0afa1cad799dff7
            >  
            > Getting back earlier than you are can be
            > very difficult. The first area to explore is church records. If you know your
            > ancestors exact denomination, you should check out all the relevant churches in
            > the area. If they were Presbyterian, and you don’t know which church they
            > attended, there are quite a few churches in the area to choose from  (4 Presbyterian in Ballymena, plus 1 Non
            > subscribing and one Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). They might also have
            > gone to church in Cullybackey, where there is 1 Presbyterian and 1 Covenanter).
            > Presbyterians in Ireland don’t follow the parish system and so which church you
            > attended was essentially a matter of personal preference.
            >  
            > Most (but not all) of these church records
            > have been microfilmed and are held at PRONI, Belfast. As far as I am aware,
            > none are on-line. The records for the first 100 years of the Cullybackey
            > Presbyterian church (Cunningham memorial) are in the Presbyterian Historical
            > Society, Belfast. In a wee blue book.
            >  
            > Tradition was to marry in the bride’s
            > church, so the church that the 1845 took place in may be her church rather than
            > his, assuming hey attended different churches.
            >
            >
            > Check the following site for graves:
            >
            > www.thebraid.com/genealogy.aspx
            >
            > Note that if you do find a grave, it doesn't necessarily mean the person attended that church. Many Presbyterians were buried in Church of Ireland graveyards for historical reasons I won't bore you with here. Some churches didn't have graveyards. An example is Cullybackey Presbyterian. Many of their congregation are therefore buried in
            > the RP (Covenanter) graveyard instead.
            >
            >  
            > Check the PRONI website for any wills and
            > other documents for your family:
            >  
            > http://applications.proni.gov.uk/DCAL_PRONI_ProniNames/SearchPage.aspx
            >  
            > Check the Findmypast.ie site for any record
            > of them. A lot of land in the Craigs area was sold through the Encumbered
            > Estates Court around 1850, and inventories of the tenants and their leases were
            > drawn up at that time, sometimes with useful details of other members of their
            > family. Check that site out., You can search the indexes free. If you get a
            > possible match, ask Linda if she will assist you with a free look up. (She has
            > a subscription).
            >  
            > http://www.findmypast.ie/account/home
            >  
            > There are other more obscure checks you can
            > do, but hopefully this will keep you busy for a little.
            >  
            >  
            > Elwyn
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Deborah Adles <dadles@...>
            > To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 15:21
            > Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans
            >
            >
            >  
            > Hi All
            >
            > I got a copy of Carleton's Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. 
            >
            > What does this mean?  that there were none in Antrim in 1660s?  My earliest known is William Kernahan, teacher in Antrim and deceased at time of son Samuel Kernaghan's wedding in 1845 in Craigs near Ballymena.  I have no birth or death info on him.  Where do I go from here? 
            >
            > Thank you for any help or direction
            >
            > Deborah Kernohan
            >
            > Florida, USA
            >

          • Deborah Adles
            Thank you, Elwyn and others. The book I have is the Carleton book. I got it on a ILL. ... Thank you, Elwyn and others.   The book I have is the Carleton
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 4, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Thank you, Elwyn and others.   The book I have is the Carleton book.  I got it on a ILL.  

              On Tue, Oct 4, 2011 at 11:10 AM, Elwyn Soutter <elwynsoutter@...> wrote:
               

              Deborah,

              I think the problem is finding the right spelling. The version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls on the Macafee site has the following KERNOGHAN/KERNAGHAN entries:
               
              2 Carnickan in Fernissey townland
              1 Carnegan in Ballyreagh
              1 Carnekan in Clough
              1 Carneckan in Kinflea
              2 Carnigan in Ballymena
              1 Carnagan in Taylorstown
               
               
              Were the family still in Craigs townland in 1851? If so, the census for that townland has survived. Check it on Liam’s site:
               
               
              Getting back earlier than you are can be very difficult. The first area to explore is church records. If you know your ancestors exact denomination, you should check out all the relevant churches in the area. If they were Presbyterian, and you don’t know which church they attended, there are quite a few churches in the area to choose from  (4 Presbyterian in Ballymena, plus 1 Non subscribing and one Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). They might also have gone to church in Cullybackey, where there is 1 Presbyterian and 1 Covenanter). Presbyterians in Ireland don’t follow the parish system and so which church you attended was essentially a matter of personal preference.
               
              Most (but not all) of these church records have been microfilmed and are held at PRONI, Belfast. As far as I am aware, none are on-line. The records for the first 100 years of the Cullybackey Presbyterian church (Cunningham memorial) are in the Presbyterian Historical Society, Belfast. In a wee blue book.
               
              Tradition was to marry in the bride’s church, so the church that the 1845 took place in may be her church rather than his, assuming hey attended different churches.


              Check the following site for graves:

              www.thebraid.com/genealogy.aspx

              Note that if you do find a grave, it doesn't necessarily mean the person attended that church. Many Presbyterians were buried in Church of Ireland graveyards for historical reasons I won't bore you with here. Some churches didn't have graveyards. An example is Cullybackey Presbyterian. Many of their congregation are therefore buried in
              the RP (Covenanter) graveyard instead.
               
              Check the PRONI website for any wills and other documents for your family:
               
               
              Check the Findmypast.ie site for any record of them. A lot of land in the Craigs area was sold through the Encumbered Estates Court around 1850, and inventories of the tenants and their leases were drawn up at that time, sometimes with useful details of other members of their family. Check that site out., You can search the indexes free. If you get a possible match, ask Linda if she will assist you with a free look up. (She has a subscription).
               
               
              There are other more obscure checks you can do, but hopefully this will keep you busy for a little.
               
               
              Elwyn


              From: Deborah Adles <dadles@...>
              To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 15:21
              Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

               
              Hi All

              I got a copy of Carleton's Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. 

              What does this mean?  that there were none in Antrim in 1660s?  My earliest known is William Kernahan, teacher in Antrim and deceased at time of son Samuel Kernaghan's wedding in 1845 in Craigs near Ballymena.  I have no birth or death info on him.  Where do I go from here? 

              Thank you for any help or direction

              Deborah Kernohan

              Florida, USA



            • Elwyn Soutter
              Gordon, I honestly don t know. However Kathleen Connolly, who is on this group, is a friend of Bill Macafee s and may well know what version he used. Kathleen?
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 4, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Gordon,

                I honestly don't know. However Kathleen Connolly, who is on this group, is a friend of Bill Macafee's and may well know what version he used. Kathleen?


                Elwyn


                From: Gordon Crooks <gordoncrooks@...>
                To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 16:58
                Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Re: Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                 
                Elwin: What version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls was used ? The best is S. T. Carleton's book on the hearth rolls.
                 
                                              Gordon
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 11:16 AM
                Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Re: Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                 
                Great advice - as always!!!

                Linda

                --- In Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com, Elwyn Soutter <elwynsoutter@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Deborah,
                >
                >
                > I think the problem is finding the right
                > spelling. The version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls on the Macafee site has the
                > following KERNOGHAN/KERNAGHAN entries:
                >  
                > 2 Carnickan in Fernissey townland
                > 1 Carnegan in Ballyreagh
                > 1 Carnekan in Clough
                > 1 Carneckan in Kinflea
                > 2 Carnigan in Ballymena
                > 1 Carnagan in Taylorstown
                >  
                > http://www.billmacafee.com/1660shearthmoneyrolls.htm
                >  
                > Were the family still in Craigs townland in
                > 1851? If so, the census for that townland has survived. Check it on Liam’s
                > site:
                >  
                > http://irishgenealogy.net/cp/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=34&t=367&sid=417128fec1a72538f0afa1cad799dff7
                >  
                > Getting back earlier than you are can be
                > very difficult. The first area to explore is church records. If you know your
                > ancestors exact denomination, you should check out all the relevant churches in
                > the area. If they were Presbyterian, and you don’t know which church they
                > attended, there are quite a few churches in the area to choose from  (4 Presbyterian in Ballymena, plus 1 Non
                > subscribing and one Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). They might also have
                > gone to church in Cullybackey, where there is 1 Presbyterian and 1 Covenanter).
                > Presbyterians in Ireland don’t follow the parish system and so which church you
                > attended was essentially a matter of personal preference.
                >  
                > Most (but not all) of these church records
                > have been microfilmed and are held at PRONI, Belfast. As far as I am aware,
                > none are on-line. The records for the first 100 years of the Cullybackey
                > Presbyterian church (Cunningham memorial) are in the Presbyterian Historical
                > Society, Belfast. In a wee blue book.
                >  
                > Tradition was to marry in the bride’s
                > church, so the church that the 1845 took place in may be her church rather than
                > his, assuming hey attended different churches.
                >
                >
                > Check the following site for graves:
                >
                > www.thebraid.com/genealogy.aspx
                >
                > Note that if you do find a grave, it doesn't necessarily mean the person attended that church. Many Presbyterians were buried in Church of Ireland graveyards for historical reasons I won't bore you with here. Some churches didn't have graveyards. An example is Cullybackey Presbyterian. Many of their congregation are therefore buried in
                > the RP (Covenanter) graveyard instead.
                >
                >  
                > Check the PRONI website for any wills and
                > other documents for your family:
                >  
                > http://applications.proni.gov.uk/DCAL_PRONI_ProniNames/SearchPage.aspx
                >  
                > Check the Findmypast.ie site for any record
                > of them. A lot of land in the Craigs area was sold through the Encumbered
                > Estates Court around 1850, and inventories of the tenants and their leases were
                > drawn up at that time, sometimes with useful details of other members of their
                > family. Check that site out., You can search the indexes free. If you get a
                > possible match, ask Linda if she will assist you with a free look up. (She has
                > a subscription).
                >  
                > http://www.findmypast.ie/account/home
                >  
                > There are other more obscure checks you can
                > do, but hopefully this will keep you busy for a little.
                >  
                >  
                > Elwyn
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: Deborah Adles <dadles@...>
                > To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 15:21
                > Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans
                >
                >
                >  
                > Hi All
                >
                > I got a copy of Carleton's Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. 
                >
                > What does this mean?  that there were none in Antrim in 1660s?  My earliest known is William Kernahan, teacher in Antrim and deceased at time of son Samuel Kernaghan's wedding in 1845 in Craigs near Ballymena.  I have no birth or death info on him.  Where do I go from here? 
                >
                > Thank you for any help or direction
                >
                > Deborah Kernohan
                >
                > Florida, USA
                >



              • Gordon Crooks
                I think its the best version, there are several others and not as good. Gordon ... From: Elwyn Soutter To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday,
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 4, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  
                  I think its the best version, there are several others and not as good.
                   
                                           Gordon
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 12:40 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Re: Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                   

                  Gordon,

                  I honestly don't know. However Kathleen Connolly, who is on this group, is a friend of Bill Macafee's and may well know what version he used. Kathleen?


                  Elwyn


                  From: Gordon Crooks <gordoncrooks@...>
                  To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 16:58
                  Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Re: Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                   
                  Elwin: What version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls was used ? The best is S. T. Carleton's book on the hearth rolls.
                   
                                                Gordon
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 11:16 AM
                  Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Re: Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                   
                  Great advice - as always!!!

                  Linda

                  --- In Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com, Elwyn Soutter <elwynsoutter@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Deborah,
                  >
                  >
                  > I think the problem is finding the right
                  > spelling. The version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls on the Macafee site has the
                  > following KERNOGHAN/KERNAGHAN entries:
                  >  
                  > 2 Carnickan in Fernissey townland
                  > 1 Carnegan in Ballyreagh
                  > 1 Carnekan in Clough
                  > 1 Carneckan in Kinflea
                  > 2 Carnigan in Ballymena
                  > 1 Carnagan in Taylorstown
                  >  
                  > http://www.billmacafee.com/1660shearthmoneyrolls.htm
                  >  
                  > Were the family still in Craigs townland in
                  > 1851? If so, the census for that townland has survived. Check it on Liam’s
                  > site:
                  >  
                  > http://irishgenealogy.net/cp/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=34&t=367&sid=417128fec1a72538f0afa1cad799dff7
                  >  
                  > Getting back earlier than you are can be
                  > very difficult. The first area to explore is church records. If you know your
                  > ancestors exact denomination, you should check out all the relevant churches in
                  > the area. If they were Presbyterian, and you don’t know which church they
                  > attended, there are quite a few churches in the area to choose from  (4 Presbyterian in Ballymena, plus 1 Non
                  > subscribing and one Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). They might also have
                  > gone to church in Cullybackey, where there is 1 Presbyterian and 1 Covenanter).
                  > Presbyterians in Ireland don’t follow the parish system and so which church you
                  > attended was essentially a matter of personal preference.
                  >  
                  > Most (but not all) of these church records
                  > have been microfilmed and are held at PRONI, Belfast. As far as I am aware,
                  > none are on-line. The records for the first 100 years of the Cullybackey
                  > Presbyterian church (Cunningham memorial) are in the Presbyterian Historical
                  > Society, Belfast. In a wee blue book.
                  >  
                  > Tradition was to marry in the bride’s
                  > church, so the church that the 1845 took place in may be her church rather than
                  > his, assuming hey attended different churches.
                  >
                  >
                  > Check the following site for graves:
                  >
                  > www.thebraid.com/genealogy.aspx
                  >
                  > Note that if you do find a grave, it doesn't necessarily mean the person attended that church. Many Presbyterians were buried in Church of Ireland graveyards for historical reasons I won't bore you with here. Some churches didn't have graveyards. An example is Cullybackey Presbyterian. Many of their congregation are therefore buried in
                  > the RP (Covenanter) graveyard instead.
                  >
                  >  
                  > Check the PRONI website for any wills and
                  > other documents for your family:
                  >  
                  > http://applications.proni.gov.uk/DCAL_PRONI_ProniNames/SearchPage.aspx
                  >  
                  > Check the Findmypast.ie site for any record
                  > of them. A lot of land in the Craigs area was sold through the Encumbered
                  > Estates Court around 1850, and inventories of the tenants and their leases were
                  > drawn up at that time, sometimes with useful details of other members of their
                  > family. Check that site out., You can search the indexes free. If you get a
                  > possible match, ask Linda if she will assist you with a free look up. (She has
                  > a subscription).
                  >  
                  > http://www.findmypast.ie/account/home
                  >  
                  > There are other more obscure checks you can
                  > do, but hopefully this will keep you busy for a little.
                  >  
                  >  
                  > Elwyn
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: Deborah Adles <dadles@...>
                  > To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 15:21
                  > Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans
                  >
                  >
                  >  
                  > Hi All
                  >
                  > I got a copy of Carleton's Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. 
                  >
                  > What does this mean?  that there were none in Antrim in 1660s?  My earliest known is William Kernahan, teacher in Antrim and deceased at time of son Samuel Kernaghan's wedding in 1845 in Craigs near Ballymena.  I have no birth or death info on him.  Where do I go from here? 
                  >
                  > Thank you for any help or direction
                  >
                  > Deborah Kernohan
                  >
                  > Florida, USA
                  >



                • Gordon Crooks
                  Deborah: The only other thing I can suggest is that you take a look at the Protestant Householder Lists and compare names and spellings Another thing what you
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 4, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Deborah: The only other thing I can suggest is that you take a look at the Protestant Householder Lists and compare names and spellings Another thing what you are experiencing is very common, example the Scots might use one spelling and the Ulsterscots another and then again it depends who actually wrote the name at the time. People who COULD READ & WRITE tended to write what they "heard" thus dialect can play a large part.
                     
                                                                 Gordon
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 12:18 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                     

                    Thank you, Elwyn and others.   The book I have is the Carleton book.  I got it on a ILL.  

                    On Tue, Oct 4, 2011 at 11:10 AM, Elwyn Soutter <elwynsoutter@...> wrote:
                     

                    Deborah,

                    I think the problem is finding the right spelling. The version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls on the Macafee site has the following KERNOGHAN/KERNAGHAN entries:
                     
                    2 Carnickan in Fernissey townland
                    1 Carnegan in Ballyreagh
                    1 Carnekan in Clough
                    1 Carneckan in Kinflea
                    2 Carnigan in Ballymena
                    1 Carnagan in Taylorstown
                     
                     
                    Were the family still in Craigs townland in 1851? If so, the census for that townland has survived. Check it on Liam’s site:
                     
                     
                    Getting back earlier than you are can be very difficult. The first area to explore is church records. If you know your ancestors exact denomination, you should check out all the relevant churches in the area. If they were Presbyterian, and you don’t know which church they attended, there are quite a few churches in the area to choose from  (4 Presbyterian in Ballymena, plus 1 Non subscribing and one Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). They might also have gone to church in Cullybackey, where there is 1 Presbyterian and 1 Covenanter). Presbyterians in Ireland don’t follow the parish system and so which church you attended was essentially a matter of personal preference.
                     
                    Most (but not all) of these church records have been microfilmed and are held at PRONI, Belfast. As far as I am aware, none are on-line. The records for the first 100 years of the Cullybackey Presbyterian church (Cunningham memorial) are in the Presbyterian Historical Society, Belfast. In a wee blue book.
                     
                    Tradition was to marry in the bride’s church, so the church that the 1845 took place in may be her church rather than his, assuming hey attended different churches.


                    Check the following site for graves:

                    www.thebraid.com/genealogy.aspx

                    Note that if you do find a grave, it doesn't necessarily mean the person attended that church. Many Presbyterians were buried in Church of Ireland graveyards for historical reasons I won't bore you with here. Some churches didn't have graveyards. An example is Cullybackey Presbyterian. Many of their congregation are therefore buried in
                    the RP (Covenanter) graveyard instead.
                     
                    Check the PRONI website for any wills and other documents for your family:
                     
                     
                    Check the Findmypast.ie site for any record of them. A lot of land in the Craigs area was sold through the Encumbered Estates Court around 1850, and inventories of the tenants and their leases were drawn up at that time, sometimes with useful details of other members of their family. Check that site out., You can search the indexes free. If you get a possible match, ask Linda if she will assist you with a free look up. (She has a subscription).
                     
                     
                    There are other more obscure checks you can do, but hopefully this will keep you busy for a little.
                     
                     
                    Elwyn


                    From: Deborah Adles <dadles@...>
                    To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 15:21
                    Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                     
                    Hi All

                    I got a copy of Carleton's Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. 

                    What does this mean?  that there were none in Antrim in 1660s?  My earliest known is William Kernahan, teacher in Antrim and deceased at time of son Samuel Kernaghan's wedding in 1845 in Craigs near Ballymena.  I have no birth or death info on him.  Where do I go from here? 

                    Thank you for any help or direction

                    Deborah Kernohan

                    Florida, USA



                  • Elwyn Soutter
                      Gordon is absolutely correct. The spelling was entirely phoenetic, very much at the writer’s whim, and heavily influenced by accent. The concern with a
                    Message 9 of 10 , Oct 4, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                       
                      Gordon is absolutely correct. The spelling was entirely phoenetic, very much at the writer’s whim, and heavily influenced by accent.

                      The concern with a "correct" spelling for names is very much a 20th century phenomenon. There are 7 surviving original examples of William Shakespeare’s signature in the world. Not two of them are spelled the same way. And he wasn’t exactly illiterate. Probably tells you that people weren’t concerned that much about spelling words and names so precisely in earlier years.


                      From: Gordon Crooks <gordoncrooks@...>
                      To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 18:56
                      Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                       
                      Deborah: The only other thing I can suggest is that you take a look at the Protestant Householder Lists and compare names and spellings Another thing what you are experiencing is very common, example the Scots might use one spelling and the Ulsterscots another and then again it depends who actually wrote the name at the time. People who COULD READ & WRITE tended to write what they "heard" thus dialect can play a large part.
                       
                                                                   Gordon
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 12:18 PM
                      Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                       
                      Thank you, Elwyn and others.   The book I have is the Carleton book.  I got it on a ILL.  

                      On Tue, Oct 4, 2011 at 11:10 AM, Elwyn Soutter <elwynsoutter@...> wrote:
                       
                      Deborah,

                      I think the problem is finding the right spelling. The version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls on the Macafee site has the following KERNOGHAN/KERNAGHAN entries:
                       
                      2 Carnickan in Fernissey townland
                      1 Carnegan in Ballyreagh
                      1 Carnekan in Clough
                      1 Carneckan in Kinflea
                      2 Carnigan in Ballymena
                      1 Carnagan in Taylorstown
                       
                       
                      Were the family still in Craigs townland in 1851? If so, the census for that townland has survived. Check it on Liam’s site:
                       
                       
                      Getting back earlier than you are can be very difficult. The first area to explore is church records. If you know your ancestors exact denomination, you should check out all the relevant churches in the area. If they were Presbyterian, and you don’t know which church they attended, there are quite a few churches in the area to choose from  (4 Presbyterian in Ballymena, plus 1 Non subscribing and one Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). They might also have gone to church in Cullybackey, where there is 1 Presbyterian and 1 Covenanter). Presbyterians in Ireland don’t follow the parish system and so which church you attended was essentially a matter of personal preference.
                       
                      Most (but not all) of these church records have been microfilmed and are held at PRONI, Belfast. As far as I am aware, none are on-line. The records for the first 100 years of the Cullybackey Presbyterian church (Cunningham memorial) are in the Presbyterian Historical Society, Belfast. In a wee blue book.
                       
                      Tradition was to marry in the bride’s church, so the church that the 1845 took place in may be her church rather than his, assuming hey attended different churches.


                      Check the following site for graves:

                      www.thebraid.com/genealogy.aspx

                      Note that if you do find a grave, it doesn't necessarily mean the person attended that church. Many Presbyterians were buried in Church of Ireland graveyards for historical reasons I won't bore you with here. Some churches didn't have graveyards. An example is Cullybackey Presbyterian. Many of their congregation are therefore buried in
                      the RP (Covenanter) graveyard instead.
                       
                      Check the PRONI website for any wills and other documents for your family:
                       
                       
                      Check the Findmypast.ie site for any record of them. A lot of land in the Craigs area was sold through the Encumbered Estates Court around 1850, and inventories of the tenants and their leases were drawn up at that time, sometimes with useful details of other members of their family. Check that site out., You can search the indexes free. If you get a possible match, ask Linda if she will assist you with a free look up. (She has a subscription).
                       
                       
                      There are other more obscure checks you can do, but hopefully this will keep you busy for a little.
                       
                       
                      Elwyn


                      From: Deborah Adles <dadles@...>
                      To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 15:21
                      Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                       
                      Hi All

                      I got a copy of Carleton's Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. 

                      What does this mean?  that there were none in Antrim in 1660s?  My earliest known is William Kernahan, teacher in Antrim and deceased at time of son Samuel Kernaghan's wedding in 1845 in Craigs near Ballymena.  I have no birth or death info on him.  Where do I go from here? 

                      Thank you for any help or direction

                      Deborah Kernohan

                      Florida, USA





                    • Gordon Crooks
                      Nice to have an ally - Thank Elwin Gordon ... From: Elwyn Soutter To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 2:17 PM Subject: Re:
                      Message 10 of 10 , Oct 4, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        
                        Nice to have an ally - Thank Elwin
                         
                                       Gordon
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 2:17 PM
                        Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                         

                         
                        Gordon is absolutely correct. The spelling was entirely phoenetic, very much at the writer’s whim, and heavily influenced by accent.

                        The concern with a "correct" spelling for names is very much a 20th century phenomenon. There are 7 surviving original examples of William Shakespeare’s signature in the world. Not two of them are spelled the same way. And he wasn’t exactly illiterate. Probably tells you that people weren’t concerned that much about spelling words and names so precisely in earlier years.


                        From: Gordon Crooks <gordoncrooks@...>
                        To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 18:56
                        Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                         
                        Deborah: The only other thing I can suggest is that you take a look at the Protestant Householder Lists and compare names and spellings Another thing what you are experiencing is very common, example the Scots might use one spelling and the Ulsterscots another and then again it depends who actually wrote the name at the time. People who COULD READ & WRITE tended to write what they "heard" thus dialect can play a large part.
                         
                                                                     Gordon
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 12:18 PM
                        Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                         
                        Thank you, Elwyn and others.   The book I have is the Carleton book.  I got it on a ILL.  

                        On Tue, Oct 4, 2011 at 11:10 AM, Elwyn Soutter <elwynsoutter@...> wrote:
                         
                        Deborah,

                        I think the problem is finding the right spelling. The version of the 1669 Hearth Rolls on the Macafee site has the following KERNOGHAN/KERNAGHAN entries:
                         
                        2 Carnickan in Fernissey townland
                        1 Carnegan in Ballyreagh
                        1 Carnekan in Clough
                        1 Carneckan in Kinflea
                        2 Carnigan in Ballymena
                        1 Carnagan in Taylorstown
                         
                         
                        Were the family still in Craigs townland in 1851? If so, the census for that townland has survived. Check it on Liam’s site:
                         
                         
                        Getting back earlier than you are can be very difficult. The first area to explore is church records. If you know your ancestors exact denomination, you should check out all the relevant churches in the area. If they were Presbyterian, and you don’t know which church they attended, there are quite a few churches in the area to choose from  (4 Presbyterian in Ballymena, plus 1 Non subscribing and one Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). They might also have gone to church in Cullybackey, where there is 1 Presbyterian and 1 Covenanter). Presbyterians in Ireland don’t follow the parish system and so which church you attended was essentially a matter of personal preference.
                         
                        Most (but not all) of these church records have been microfilmed and are held at PRONI, Belfast. As far as I am aware, none are on-line. The records for the first 100 years of the Cullybackey Presbyterian church (Cunningham memorial) are in the Presbyterian Historical Society, Belfast. In a wee blue book.
                         
                        Tradition was to marry in the bride’s church, so the church that the 1845 took place in may be her church rather than his, assuming hey attended different churches.


                        Check the following site for graves:

                        www.thebraid.com/genealogy.aspx

                        Note that if you do find a grave, it doesn't necessarily mean the person attended that church. Many Presbyterians were buried in Church of Ireland graveyards for historical reasons I won't bore you with here. Some churches didn't have graveyards. An example is Cullybackey Presbyterian. Many of their congregation are therefore buried in
                        the RP (Covenanter) graveyard instead.
                         
                        Check the PRONI website for any wills and other documents for your family:
                         
                         
                        Check the Findmypast.ie site for any record of them. A lot of land in the Craigs area was sold through the Encumbered Estates Court around 1850, and inventories of the tenants and their leases were drawn up at that time, sometimes with useful details of other members of their family. Check that site out., You can search the indexes free. If you get a possible match, ask Linda if she will assist you with a free look up. (She has a subscription).
                         
                         
                        There are other more obscure checks you can do, but hopefully this will keep you busy for a little.
                         
                         
                        Elwyn


                        From: Deborah Adles <dadles@...>
                        To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Tuesday, 4 October 2011, 15:21
                        Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Hearth and Poll Taxes - no Kernohans

                         
                        Hi All

                        I got a copy of Carleton's Heads and Hearths and am disappointed to find there are no Kernoghans, Kernaghans, Kernohans, Kernahans anywhere. 

                        What does this mean?  that there were none in Antrim in 1660s?  My earliest known is William Kernahan, teacher in Antrim and deceased at time of son Samuel Kernaghan's wedding in 1845 in Craigs near Ballymena.  I have no birth or death info on him.  Where do I go from here? 

                        Thank you for any help or direction

                        Deborah Kernohan

                        Florida, USA





                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.