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Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

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  • L.G. McF
    The following collection of dialect words and phrases are still in fairly common use in many parts of Northern Ulster. They are very expressive, and are well
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      The following collection of dialect words and phrases are still in fairly common use in many parts of Northern Ulster. They are very expressive, and are well worth preserving:-     
       
      Gunk        Disconcert
      Dayligone    Twilight
      Waghill        Walk laboriously
      Spraghel    Struggle as on soft ground
      Whamling    Overturning
      Cope-carley    Heels over head
      Kep        Stop
      Kye        Cows
      Kileery        Light-headed
      Tovy        Boastful
      Handling    Troublesome
      Garevitch    Disorderly gathering
      Cannot see a stime       Cannot see any
      Hain        Economise
      Footy        Mean, narrow
      Beddy        Impudent
      Birl        Turn round
      Sleekit        Crafty
      Spitting    Commencing to rain
      Deaf as a door nail    Very deaf
      Blind as a cleg        Very blind
      Thole        Suffer
      Stoor        Dust
      Oxtercog    Holding up by armpits
      Deil a hate    Nothing at all
      Clodding    Throwing stones or missiles
      Coom        Peat dust
      Thrawn        Cross-grained
      Gulpin        Ill-bred pretentious person
      Get the lees    Get into order
      Ar        Scar
      Fornenst    Opposite
      Gomey        Stupied person
      Baughill and Glunter    Awkward person
      Gype        Impudent person
      Mouth        Impudent, ignorant person
      Greeshough    Remains of peat fire
      Clabber and Glar    Mud
      Gar        Compel
      Slap        Gap in fence
      Be to be done    Must be done
      Gowling        Shouting
      Greeting and Roaring    Crying or weeping
      Donsey        Sickly
      Sca'd a Papish    Very hot
      Gopen        Full of both hands
      Just waiting on        A person dying
      Gye and bad        Very ill
      Lift your feet and they'll fall themselves    Hurry up
      Canny        Slow, deliberate
      Imperent    Impertinent
      Cracked        Slightly demented
      Crack        Chat
      Brash        An illness or a turn at the churn
      Kailying    Gossiping in neighbour's house
      Sail        Lift in a car
      Slithered away    Went slowly
      Never let on    Never tell
      Gappie        Stupid person
      Hap yourself    Roll yourself in the clothes
      Bravely        Well
      Hunker        Bend the knees
      Sonsy        Big, hearty
      Wee knowing and wee little        A little
      Dander        Walk
      Chew, dog    Don't bite
      Queer and well    Very suitable
      Skite        Slap with the hand
      Dwam        Fit of illness
      Well at himself    Rich: in good health
      Letting on    Pretending
      On for it    In favour of it
      Sconsing    Pretending
      Laired        Stuck in mud
      Crowdy        Mixed food of many ingredients
      Roytery        Rubbish
      Gral of a fellow    Youth
      Fadge        Potato cake
      Ram stam    In a forcible irregular manner
      Moily        Cow with no horns
      Shugly-shoo    See-saw
      Jostling    Pushing with the elbow
      Hashtyer    Careless untidy person
      Cogly        Unsteady
      Japs        Sparks of mud
      Blate        Bashful, quiet
      Girning        Complaining
      Gazeby        Big unsuitable house
      Bunker        Grass at side of road
      Colfing        Filling up
      Tirling        Blowing off the thatch
      Dooless        No energy
      Blubbering    Crying
      Strar        Part of cart harness
      Turry        Pig
      Tukey        Hen
      Droich or dhory    Smallest in the litter
      Scraighing    Shouting in hoarse voice
      Floostering    Making much of: fondling
      Clipe        Tell-tale
      Rodden or loanin    Bye road or path
      Spulpin        Scoundrel
      Throughother    Disorderly
      Getting into a pucker    Getting into a temper
      Thaveless    Without confidence: unsettled
      Jirging        Boots making a noise
      Kell        Dirt
      Kist        Chest or big box
      Yammering    Constant talk
      Guttery        Muddy
      Shilpit        Thin
      Cogged        Propped up
      At the leep    Half-boiled potatoes
      Dunt        To knock
      Striddling    Walking wide
      Camslush    Flattery
      Soft sodder    Too much praise
      Wee tory rogue    A little rascal
      Hurroosh    Outcry over very little
      Gawk        Awkward
      Slouster    A mess to eat
      Snigger        A smothered laugh
      White laugh    A derisive laugh
      Farnteckled    Freckled
      Sinnery        In two
      Duds        Clothes
      Lilt        A song
      Lauchter    A brood
      Skilted and skedaddled        Ran away
      Chay, lady    To quieten a restless cow
      Hardly fash    Not likely to do it
      Blethers    Nonsense
      Harned        Bakes (bread)
      Wee dight    A little clearing
      Arles        Money given to confirm a hiring contract
      Groak        Looking meanly for anything
      Sliddering    In a slow, gliding manner
      Kitchen        Meat diet
      Footer        Incapable of doing anything right
      Eileens        Two people of same age
      Smur        Fine rain
      Levat        A tirade
      Pisel        A slow worker
      Heart o' corn    A genial, entertaining person
      Colour or taste    A little
      Margymore    A disorderly show
      Crabbit        Cross
      Forbye        Besides
      Cant        Auction
      Kemp        Complete
      Nirr        Ill-grained person
      Dreigh        Slow
      Snedding turnips Trimming turnips
      Stoon        A dull aching pain
      Deave        Bore with talk
      Grist        Proper temperature
      Gave him all sorts    Gave him a severe scolding
      Never fash    Never trouble
      Dinnel        A painful feeling caused by cold
      Take it all its time    Doubtful
      Not up to much    Of inferior degree
      Hunker-sliding    Evading
      Sowans        Porridge made from shirings and oatmeal
      Beastings    The first milk of a cow, boiled
      Champ        Mashed potatoes and milk
      Crowdie and styaghie    Mess of food
      Meal a Crushy    Oatmeal fried with gravy
      Clart        Untidy woman
      Targe        Nagging, bad tempered woman
      Feardie        Coward
      Grulch        Short, squat person
      Dunch        Nudge with the elbow
      Ganch        Stammer
      Scrab        Scratch with the nail
      Scunner        Disgust
      Brust        Burst
      Skelly        Squint
      Hirple        Walk lamely
      Jorum        Good quality of fluid
      Bruchle        Roughness: a good handful
      Bruckle        Easily broken
      Blatter        A loud noise
      Tully-eyed    Squinting
      Dwam        A slight attack of illness
      To the bat of a stick    Exactly suitable
      Lashings and lavings    Plenty and to spare
      Stack of ribs    Emaciated person
      Brockies    Mountain sheep
      Creash        Grease
      Big        On friendly terms
      Balderdash    Nonsense
      Gullion        A quagmire
      Gowl        A shout
      Gidderell    A senseless person
      Skeigwig and skible    Two words of reproach
      Scoudered    Bread underbaked
      Skimpit        Pinched: not enough material
      Gallises    Braces for men's trousers
      Snash        Impudence
      Whups        Lots of
      Trig        Smart-looking: neat
      Dreigh        Tedious
      Cagey        A horse that is fresh
      Cat-wit        A troublesome critic
      Bully        Fine or excelling
      Drunted        Disappointed
      Silly        Shaky, unsubstantial
      Middling    Fairly
      Quie        A heifer calf
      Tidy        A cow or heifer with calf
      Curcuddiagh     Self-complacent or self-satisfied

      PS;  Does anybody have a Dog tracker/finder that they nolonger use? Maybe I could buy it from you.  My Boston Terrier keeps chasing rabbits, squirrels, birds, leaves, if it moves she chases it. She then gets lost and cannot find her way back out of the woods and just follows the first person she meets. I was looking on Ebay and Amazon but they do not ship to Europe.

      This link will give a general idea of the size of woodland. Bos and Bossen mean forest or woods in dutch.The Apartments have been refurbish since 2008 so this is an old photograph taken during the stage.

      Link: <http://maps.google.nl/maps?q=Pieter+Nuytsstraat+50,+5665+Geldrop-Mierlo&sll=49.853263,10.578792&sspn=5.328664,5.636233&hl=nl&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Pieter+Nuytsstraat+50,+5665+Geldrop,+Mierlo,+Noord-Brabant&ll=51.425464,5.583115&spn=0.006101,0.017982&z=15&iwloc=A>
    • susanshira@aol.com
      I am from western Pennsylvania where the clergy like to say that Presbyterians are denser than in any other part of the country. This is where many of the
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        I am from western Pennsylvania where the clergy like to say that "Presbyterians are denser than in any other part of the country."
        This is where many of the Ulster Scots moved when they arrived.
        I was surprised at how many of these words are still in common usage. Even tho my mother's  family had been here for generations, my father's grandparents were new arrivals and Ihave been familiar with these words on both sides.
         
        (Rev. Susan Shira Nilsen  
         
         


        -----Original Message-----
        From: L.G. McF <larneman@...>
        To: Linda's List <Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com>; antrim <antrim@...>
        Sent: Thu, Dec 3, 2009 10:45 am
        Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

         
        The following collection of dialect words and phrases are still in fairly common use in many parts of Northern Ulster. They are very expressive, and are well worth preserving:-     
         
        Gunk        Disconcert
        Dayligone    Twilight
        Waghill        Walk laboriously
        Spraghel    Struggle as on soft ground
        Whamling    Overturning
        Cope-carley    Heels over head
        Kep        Stop
        Kye        Cows
        Kileery        Light-headed
        Tovy        Boastful
        Handling    Troublesome
        Garevitch    Disorderly gathering
        Cannot see a stime       Cannot see any
        Hain        Economise
        Footy        Mean, narrow
        Beddy        Impudent
        Birl        Turn round
        Sleekit        Crafty
        Spitting    Commencing to rain
        Deaf as a door nail    Very deaf
        Blind as a cleg        Very blind
        Thole        Suffer
        Stoor        Dust
        Oxtercog    Holding up by armpits
        Deil a hate    Nothing at all
        Clodding    Throwing stones or missiles
        Coom        Peat dust
        Thrawn        Cross-grained
        Gulpin        Ill-bred pretentious person
        Get the lees    Get into order
        Ar        Scar
        Fornenst    Opposite
        Gomey        Stupied person
        Baughill and Glunter    Awkward person
        Gype        Impudent person
        Mouth        Impudent, ignorant person
        Greeshough    Remains of peat fire
        Clabber and Glar    Mud
        Gar        Compel
        Slap        Gap in fence
        Be to be done    Must be done
        Gowling        Shouting
        Greeting and Roaring    Crying or weeping
        Donsey        Sickly
        Sca'd a Papish    Very hot
        Gopen        Full of both hands
        Just waiting on        A person dying
        Gye and bad        Very ill
        Lift your feet and they'll fall themselves    Hurry up
        Canny        Slow, deliberate
        Imperent    Impertinent
        Cracked        Slightly demented
        Crack        Chat
        Brash        An illness or a turn at the churn
        Kailying    Gossiping in neighbour's house
        Sail        Lift in a car
        Slithered away    Went slowly
        Never let on    Never tell
        Gappie        Stupid person
        Hap yourself    Roll yourself in the clothes
        Bravely        Well
        Hunker        Bend the knees
        Sonsy        Big, hearty
        Wee knowing and wee little        A little
        Dander        Walk
        Chew, dog    Don't bite
        Queer and well    Very suitable
        Skite        Slap with the hand
        Dwam        Fit of illness
        Well at himself    Rich: in good health
        Letting on    Pretending
        On for it    In favour of it
        Sconsing    Pretending
        Laired        Stuck in mud
        Crowdy        Mixed food of many ingredients
        Roytery        Rubbish
        Gral of a fellow    Youth
        Fadge        Potato cake
        Ram stam    In a forcible irregular manner
        Moily        Cow with no horns
        Shugly-shoo    See-saw
        Jostling    Pushing with the elbow
        Hashtyer    Careless untidy person
        Cogly        Unsteady
        Japs        Sparks of mud
        Blate        Bashful, quiet
        Girning        Complaining
        Gazeby        Big unsuitable house
        Bunker        Grass at side of road
        Colfing        Filling up
        Tirling        Blowing off the thatch
        Dooless        No energy
        Blubbering    Crying
        Strar        Part of cart harness
        Turry        Pig
        Tukey        Hen
        Droich or dhory    Smallest in the litter
        Scraighing    Shouting in hoarse voice
        Floostering    Making much of: fondling
        Clipe        Tell-tale
        Rodden or loanin    Bye road or path
        Spulpin        Scoundrel
        Throughother    Disorderly
        Getting into a pucker    Getting into a temper
        Thaveless    Without confidence: unsettled
        Jirging        Boots making a noise
        Kell        Dirt
        Kist        Chest or big box
        Yammering    Constant talk
        Guttery        Muddy
        Shilpit        Thin
        Cogged        Propped up
        At the leep    Half-boiled potatoes
        Dunt        To knock
        Striddling    Walking wide
        Camslush    Flattery
        Soft sodder    Too much praise
        Wee tory rogue    A little rascal
        Hurroosh    Outcry over very little
        Gawk        Awkward
        Slouster    A mess to eat
        Snigger        A smothered laugh
        White laugh    A derisive laugh
        Farnteckled    Freckled
        Sinnery        In two
        Duds        Clothes
        Lilt        A song
        Lauchter    A brood
        Skilted and skedaddled        Ran away
        Chay, lady    To quieten a restless cow
        Hardly fash    Not likely to do it
        Blethers    Nonsense
        Harned        Bakes (bread)
        Wee dight    A little clearing
        Arles        Money given to confirm a hiring contract
        Groak        Looking meanly for anything
        Sliddering    In a slow, gliding manner
        Kitchen        Meat diet
        Footer        Incapable of doing anything right
        Eileens        Two people of same age
        Smur        Fine rain
        Levat        A tirade
        Pisel        A slow worker
        Heart o' corn    A genial, entertaining person
        Colour or taste    A little
        Margymore    A disorderly show
        Crabbit        Cross
        Forbye        Besides
        Cant        Auction
        Kemp        Complete
        Nirr        Ill-grained person
        Dreigh        Slow
        Snedding turnips Trimming turnips
        Stoon        A dull aching pain
        Deave        Bore with talk
        Grist        Proper temperature
        Gave him all sorts    Gave him a severe scolding
        Never fash    Never trouble
        Dinnel        A painful feeling caused by cold
        Take it all its time    Doubtful
        Not up to much    Of inferior degree
        Hunker-sliding    Evading
        Sowans        Porridge made from shirings and oatmeal
        Beastings    The first milk of a cow, boiled
        Champ        Mashed potatoes and milk
        Crowdie and styaghie    Mess of food
        Meal a Crushy    Oatmeal fried with gravy
        Clart        Untidy woman
        Targe        Nagging, bad tempered woman
        Feardie        Coward
        Grulch        Short, squat person
        Dunch        Nudge with the elbow
        Ganch        Stammer
        Scrab        Scratch with the nail
        Scunner        Disgust
        Brust        Burst
        Skelly        Squint
        Hirple        Walk lamely
        Jorum        Good quality of fluid
        Bruchle        Roughness: a good handful
        Bruckle        Easily broken
        Blatter        A loud noise
        Tully-eyed    Squinting
        Dwam        A slight attack of illness
        To the bat of a stick    Exactly suitable
        Lashings and lavings    Plenty and to spare
        Stack of ribs    Emaciated person
        Brockies    Mountain sheep
        Creash        Grease
        Big        On friendly terms
        Balderdash    Nonsense
        Gullion        A quagmire
        Gowl        A shout
        Gidderell    A senseless person
        Skeigwig and skible    Two words of reproach
        Scoudered    Bread underbaked
        Skimpit        Pinched: not enough material
        Gallises    Braces for men's trousers
        Snash        Impudence
        Whups        Lots of
        Trig        Smart-looking: neat
        Dreigh        Tedious
        Cagey        A horse that is fresh
        Cat-wit        A troublesome critic
        Bully        Fine or excelling
        Drunted        Disappointed
        Silly        Shaky, unsubstantial
        Middling    Fairly
        Quie        A heifer calf
        Tidy        A cow or heifer with calf
        Curcuddiagh     Self-complacent or self-satisfied

        PS;  Does anybody have a Dog tracker/finder that they nolonger use? Maybe I could buy it from you.  My Boston Terrier keeps chasing rabbits, squirrels, birds, leaves, if it moves she chases it. She then gets lost and cannot find her way back out of the woods and just follows the first person she meets. I was looking on Ebay and Amazon but they do not ship to Europe.

        This link will give a general idea of the size of woodland. Bos and Bossen mean forest or woods in dutch.The Apartments have been refurbish since 2008 so this is an old photograph taken during the stage.

        Link: <http://maps. google.nl/ maps?q=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop-Mierlo&sll=49.853263, 10.578792&sspn=5.328664, 5.636233&hl=nl&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop,+ Mierlo,+Noord- Brabant&ll=51.425464, 5.583115&spn=0.006101, 0.017982&z=15&iwloc=A>
      • Gordon Crooks@verizon.net
        Basically I research Franklin Co, however I do look into Adams and Beaver from time to time. Also Westmoreland, Allegheny, and Venango. But I am not real
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Basically I research Franklin Co, however I do look into Adams and Beaver from time to time. Also Westmoreland, Allegheny, and Venango. But I am not real knowledgeable about most of them except Franklin. In most cases I was chasing a Crooks. What also made it interesting is that by about 1750 there were about 6 Crooks families in western Pa. and I have long felt they were distantly related, plus the fact that they were often curious about other Crooks families and knew them etc.That plus I have often feld the two Crooks in the original Londonderry Plantation in 1621 were the parents of al or most of the 5 Crooks families found in Antrim in 1669, almost all of these families can be traced to Pa..
           
          Regarding the words and meanings yes I agree with you. I also wrote to the Rev.Nilsen privately as I think we know some kindred souls. I am also trying to locate one of those collars for dogs for Liam, my daughter sells and buys on E Bay. My eye sight is CRAPPY, doctor has changed medications and I am doing hot wet surgical six times a day on the eye
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, December 03, 2009 7:33 PM
          Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

           

          The list was fun to read, wasn't it?  I may have already asked you this - what area of PA and what surname are you researching?  My Burnsides moved from the Ballymena area to Beaver Co.


          Linda
          On Dec 3, 2009, at 8:44 AM, susanshira@aol. com wrote:


          I am from western Pennsylvania where the clergy like to say that "Presbyterians are denser than in any other part of the country."
          This is where many of the Ulster Scots moved when they arrived.
          I was surprised at how many of these words are still in common usage. Even tho my mother's  family had been here for generations, my father's grandparents were new arrivals and Ihave been familiar with these words on both sides.
           
          (Rev. Susan Shira Nilsen  
           



           
          -----Original Message-----
          From: L.G. McF <larneman@gmail. com>
          To: Linda's List <Mid-AntrimGenealogy @yahoogroups. com>; antrim <antrim@irishgenealo gy.net>
          Sent: Thu, Dec 3, 2009 10:45 am
          Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealog y] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

           
          The following collection of dialect words and phrases are still in fairly common use in many parts of Northern Ulster. They are very expressive, and are well worth preserving:-      
            
          Gunk        Disconcert
          Dayligone    Twilight
          Waghill        Walk laboriously
          Spraghel    Struggle as on soft ground
          Whamling    Overturning
          Cope-carley    Heels over head
          Kep        Stop
          Kye        Cows
          Kileery        Light-headed
          Tovy        Boastful
          Handling    Troublesome
          Garevitch    Disorderly gathering
          Cannot see a stime       Cannot see any
          Hain        Economise
          Footy        Mean, narrow
          Beddy        Impudent
          Birl        Turn round
          Sleekit        Crafty
          Spitting    Commencing to rain
          Deaf as a door nail    Very deaf
          Blind as a cleg        Very blind
          Thole        Suffer
          Stoor        Dust
          Oxtercog    Holding up by armpits
          Deil a hate    Nothing at all
          Clodding    Throwing stones or missiles
          Coom        Peat dust
          Thrawn        Cross-grained
          Gulpin        Ill-bred pretentious person
          Get the lees    Get into order
          Ar        Scar
          Fornenst    Opposite
          Gomey        Stupied person
          Baughill and Glunter    Awkward person
          Gype        Impudent person
          Mouth        Impudent, ignorant person
          Greeshough    Remains of peat fire
          Clabber and Glar    Mud
          Gar        Compel
          Slap        Gap in fence
          Be to be done    Must be done
          Gowling        Shouting
          Greeting and Roaring    Crying or weeping
          Donsey        Sickly
          Sca'd a Papish    Very hot
          Gopen        Full of both hands
          Just waiting on        A person dying
          Gye and bad        Very ill
          Lift your feet and they'll fall themselves    Hurry up
          Canny        Slow, deliberate
          Imperent    Impertinent
          Cracked        Slightly demented
          Crack        Chat
          Brash        An illness or a turn at the churn
          Kailying    Gossiping in neighbour's house
          Sail        Lift in a car
          Slithered away    Went slowly
          Never let on    Never tell
          Gappie        Stupid person
          Hap yourself    Roll yourself in the clothes
          Bravely        Well
          Hunker        Bend the knees
          Sonsy        Big, hearty
          Wee knowing and wee little        A little
          Dander        Walk
          Chew, dog    Don't bite
          Queer and well    Very suitable
          Skite        Slap with the hand
          Dwam        Fit of illness
          Well at himself    Rich: in good health
          Letting on    Pretending
          On for it    In favour of it
          Sconsing    Pretending
          Laired        Stuck in mud
          Crowdy        Mixed food of many ingredients
          Roytery        Rubbish
          Gral of a fellow    Youth
          Fadge        Potato cake
          Ram stam    In a forcible irregular manner
          Moily        Cow with no horns
          Shugly-shoo    See-saw
          Jostling    Pushing with the elbow
          Hashtyer    Careless untidy person
          Cogly        Unsteady
          Japs        Sparks of mud
          Blate        Bashful, quiet
          Girning        Complaining
          Gazeby        Big unsuitable house
          Bunker        Grass at side of road
          Colfing        Filling up
          Tirling        Blowing off the thatch
          Dooless        No energy
          Blubbering    Crying
          Strar        Part of cart harness
          Turry        Pig
          Tukey        Hen
          Droich or dhory    Smallest in the litter
          Scraighing    Shouting in hoarse voice
          Floostering    Making much of: fondling
          Clipe        Tell-tale
          Rodden or loanin    Bye road or path
          Spulpin        Scoundrel
          Throughother    Disorderly
          Getting into a pucker    Getting into a temper
          Thaveless    Without confidence: unsettled
          Jirging        Boots making a noise
          Kell        Dirt
          Kist        Chest or big box
          Yammering    Constant talk
          Guttery        Muddy
          Shilpit        Thin
          Cogged        Propped up
          At the leep    Half-boiled potatoes
          Dunt        To knock
          Striddling    Walking wide
          Camslush    Flattery
          Soft sodder    Too much praise
          Wee tory rogue    A little rascal
          Hurroosh    Outcry over very little
          Gawk        Awkward
          Slouster    A mess to eat
          Snigger        A smothered laugh
          White laugh    A derisive laugh
          Farnteckled    Freckled
          Sinnery        In two
          Duds        Clothes
          Lilt        A song
          Lauchter    A brood
          Skilted and skedaddled        Ran away
          Chay, lady    To quieten a restless cow
          Hardly fash    Not likely to do it
          Blethers    Nonsense
          Harned        Bakes (bread)
          Wee dight    A little clearing
          Arles        Money given to confirm a hiring contract
          Groak        Looking meanly for anything
          Sliddering    In a slow, gliding manner
          Kitchen        Meat diet
          Footer        Incapable of doing anything right
          Eileens        Two people of same age
          Smur        Fine rain
          Levat        A tirade
          Pisel        A slow worker
          Heart o' corn    A genial, entertaining person
          Colour or taste    A little
          Margymore    A disorderly show
          Crabbit        Cross
          Forbye        Besides
          Cant        Auction
          Kemp        Complete
          Nirr        Ill-grained person
          Dreigh        Slow
          Snedding turnips Trimming turnips
          Stoon        A dull aching pain
          Deave        Bore with talk
          Grist        Proper temperature
          Gave him all sorts    Gave him a severe scolding
          Never fash    Never trouble
          Dinnel        A painful feeling caused by cold
          Take it all its time    Doubtful
          Not up to much    Of inferior degree
          Hunker-sliding    Evading
          Sowans        Porridge made from shirings and oatmeal
          Beastings    The first milk of a cow, boiled
          Champ        Mashed potatoes and milk
          Crowdie and styaghie    Mess of food
          Meal a Crushy    Oatmeal fried with gravy
          Clart        Untidy woman
          Targe        Nagging, bad tempered woman
          Feardie        Coward
          Grulch        Short, squat person
          Dunch        Nudge with the elbow
          Ganch        Stammer
          Scrab        Scratch with the nail
          Scunner        Disgust
          Brust        Burst
          Skelly        Squint
          Hirple        Walk lamely
          Jorum        Good quality of fluid
          Bruchle        Roughness: a good handful
          Bruckle        Easily broken
          Blatter        A loud noise
          Tully-eyed    Squinting
          Dwam        A slight attack of illness
          To the bat of a stick    Exactly suitable
          Lashings and lavings    Plenty and to spare
          Stack of ribs    Emaciated person
          Brockies    Mountain sheep
          Creash        Grease
          Big        On friendly terms
          Balderdash    Nonsense
          Gullion        A quagmire
          Gowl        A shout
          Gidderell    A senseless person
          Skeigwig and skible    Two words of reproach
          Scoudered    Bread underbaked
          Skimpit        Pinched: not enough material
          Gallises    Braces for men's trousers
          Snash        Impudence
          Whups        Lots of
          Trig        Smart-looking: neat
          Dreigh        Tedious
          Cagey        A horse that is fresh
          Cat-wit        A troublesome critic
          Bully        Fine or excelling
          Drunted        Disappointed
          Silly        Shaky, unsubstantial
          Middling    Fairly
          Quie        A heifer calf
          Tidy        A cow or heifer with calf
          Curcuddiagh     Self-complacent or self-satisfied

          PS;  Does anybody have a Dog tracker/finder that they nolonger use? Maybe I could buy it from you.  My Boston Terrier keeps chasing rabbits, squirrels, birds, leaves, if it moves she chases it. She then gets lost and cannot find her way back out of the woods and just follows the first person she meets. I was looking on Ebay and Amazon but they do not ship to Europe.

          This link will give a general idea of the size of woodland. Bos and Bossen mean forest or woods in dutch.The Apartments have been refurbish since 2008 so this is an old photograph taken during the stage.

          Link: <http://maps. google.nl/ maps?q=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop-Mierlo&sll=49.853263, 10.578792&sspn=5.328664, 5.636233&hl=nl&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop,+ Mierlo,+Noord- Brabant&ll=51.425464, 5.583115&spn=0.006101, 0.017982&z=15&iwloc=A>




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        • Linda Holley
          The list was fun to read, wasn t it? I may have already asked you this - what area of PA and what surname are you researching? My Burnsides moved from the
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            The list was fun to read, wasn't it?  I may have already asked you this - what area of PA and what surname are you researching?  My Burnsides moved from the Ballymena area to Beaver Co.

            Linda
            On Dec 3, 2009, at 8:44 AM, susanshira@... wrote:


            I am from western Pennsylvania where the clergy like to say that "Presbyterians are denser than in any other part of the country."
            This is where many of the Ulster Scots moved when they arrived.
            I was surprised at how many of these words are still in common usage. Even tho my mother's  family had been here for generations, my father's grandparents were new arrivals and Ihave been familiar with these words on both sides.
             
            (Rev. Susan Shira Nilsen  
             
             


            -----Original Message-----
            From: L.G. McF <larneman@gmail. com>
            To: Linda's List <Mid-AntrimGenealogy @yahoogroups. com>; antrim <antrim@irishgenealo gy.net>
            Sent: Thu, Dec 3, 2009 10:45 am
            Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealog y] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

             
            The following collection of dialect words and phrases are still in fairly common use in many parts of Northern Ulster. They are very expressive, and are well worth preserving:-      
              
            Gunk        Disconcert
            Dayligone    Twilight
            Waghill        Walk laboriously
            Spraghel    Struggle as on soft ground
            Whamling    Overturning
            Cope-carley    Heels over head
            Kep        Stop
            Kye        Cows
            Kileery        Light-headed
            Tovy        Boastful
            Handling    Troublesome
            Garevitch    Disorderly gathering
            Cannot see a stime       Cannot see any
            Hain        Economise
            Footy        Mean, narrow
            Beddy        Impudent
            Birl        Turn round
            Sleekit        Crafty
            Spitting    Commencing to rain
            Deaf as a door nail    Very deaf
            Blind as a cleg        Very blind
            Thole        Suffer
            Stoor        Dust
            Oxtercog    Holding up by armpits
            Deil a hate    Nothing at all
            Clodding    Throwing stones or missiles
            Coom        Peat dust
            Thrawn        Cross-grained
            Gulpin        Ill-bred pretentious person
            Get the lees    Get into order
            Ar        Scar
            Fornenst    Opposite
            Gomey        Stupied person
            Baughill and Glunter    Awkward person
            Gype        Impudent person
            Mouth        Impudent, ignorant person
            Greeshough    Remains of peat fire
            Clabber and Glar    Mud
            Gar        Compel
            Slap        Gap in fence
            Be to be done    Must be done
            Gowling        Shouting
            Greeting and Roaring    Crying or weeping
            Donsey        Sickly
            Sca'd a Papish    Very hot
            Gopen        Full of both hands
            Just waiting on        A person dying
            Gye and bad        Very ill
            Lift your feet and they'll fall themselves    Hurry up
            Canny        Slow, deliberate
            Imperent    Impertinent
            Cracked        Slightly demented
            Crack        Chat
            Brash        An illness or a turn at the churn
            Kailying    Gossiping in neighbour's house
            Sail        Lift in a car
            Slithered away    Went slowly
            Never let on    Never tell
            Gappie        Stupid person
            Hap yourself    Roll yourself in the clothes
            Bravely        Well
            Hunker        Bend the knees
            Sonsy        Big, hearty
            Wee knowing and wee little        A little
            Dander        Walk
            Chew, dog    Don't bite
            Queer and well    Very suitable
            Skite        Slap with the hand
            Dwam        Fit of illness
            Well at himself    Rich: in good health
            Letting on    Pretending
            On for it    In favour of it
            Sconsing    Pretending
            Laired        Stuck in mud
            Crowdy        Mixed food of many ingredients
            Roytery        Rubbish
            Gral of a fellow    Youth
            Fadge        Potato cake
            Ram stam    In a forcible irregular manner
            Moily        Cow with no horns
            Shugly-shoo    See-saw
            Jostling    Pushing with the elbow
            Hashtyer    Careless untidy person
            Cogly        Unsteady
            Japs        Sparks of mud
            Blate        Bashful, quiet
            Girning        Complaining
            Gazeby        Big unsuitable house
            Bunker        Grass at side of road
            Colfing        Filling up
            Tirling        Blowing off the thatch
            Dooless        No energy
            Blubbering    Crying
            Strar        Part of cart harness
            Turry        Pig
            Tukey        Hen
            Droich or dhory    Smallest in the litter
            Scraighing    Shouting in hoarse voice
            Floostering    Making much of: fondling
            Clipe        Tell-tale
            Rodden or loanin    Bye road or path
            Spulpin        Scoundrel
            Throughother    Disorderly
            Getting into a pucker    Getting into a temper
            Thaveless    Without confidence: unsettled
            Jirging        Boots making a noise
            Kell        Dirt
            Kist        Chest or big box
            Yammering    Constant talk
            Guttery        Muddy
            Shilpit        Thin
            Cogged        Propped up
            At the leep    Half-boiled potatoes
            Dunt        To knock
            Striddling    Walking wide
            Camslush    Flattery
            Soft sodder    Too much praise
            Wee tory rogue    A little rascal
            Hurroosh    Outcry over very little
            Gawk        Awkward
            Slouster    A mess to eat
            Snigger        A smothered laugh
            White laugh    A derisive laugh
            Farnteckled    Freckled
            Sinnery        In two
            Duds        Clothes
            Lilt        A song
            Lauchter    A brood
            Skilted and skedaddled        Ran away
            Chay, lady    To quieten a restless cow
            Hardly fash    Not likely to do it
            Blethers    Nonsense
            Harned        Bakes (bread)
            Wee dight    A little clearing
            Arles        Money given to confirm a hiring contract
            Groak        Looking meanly for anything
            Sliddering    In a slow, gliding manner
            Kitchen        Meat diet
            Footer        Incapable of doing anything right
            Eileens        Two people of same age
            Smur        Fine rain
            Levat        A tirade
            Pisel        A slow worker
            Heart o' corn    A genial, entertaining person
            Colour or taste    A little
            Margymore    A disorderly show
            Crabbit        Cross
            Forbye        Besides
            Cant        Auction
            Kemp        Complete
            Nirr        Ill-grained person
            Dreigh        Slow
            Snedding turnips Trimming turnips
            Stoon        A dull aching pain
            Deave        Bore with talk
            Grist        Proper temperature
            Gave him all sorts    Gave him a severe scolding
            Never fash    Never trouble
            Dinnel        A painful feeling caused by cold
            Take it all its time    Doubtful
            Not up to much    Of inferior degree
            Hunker-sliding    Evading
            Sowans        Porridge made from shirings and oatmeal
            Beastings    The first milk of a cow, boiled
            Champ        Mashed potatoes and milk
            Crowdie and styaghie    Mess of food
            Meal a Crushy    Oatmeal fried with gravy
            Clart        Untidy woman
            Targe        Nagging, bad tempered woman
            Feardie        Coward
            Grulch        Short, squat person
            Dunch        Nudge with the elbow
            Ganch        Stammer
            Scrab        Scratch with the nail
            Scunner        Disgust
            Brust        Burst
            Skelly        Squint
            Hirple        Walk lamely
            Jorum        Good quality of fluid
            Bruchle        Roughness: a good handful
            Bruckle        Easily broken
            Blatter        A loud noise
            Tully-eyed    Squinting
            Dwam        A slight attack of illness
            To the bat of a stick    Exactly suitable
            Lashings and lavings    Plenty and to spare
            Stack of ribs    Emaciated person
            Brockies    Mountain sheep
            Creash        Grease
            Big        On friendly terms
            Balderdash    Nonsense
            Gullion        A quagmire
            Gowl        A shout
            Gidderell    A senseless person
            Skeigwig and skible    Two words of reproach
            Scoudered    Bread underbaked
            Skimpit        Pinched: not enough material
            Gallises    Braces for men's trousers
            Snash        Impudence
            Whups        Lots of
            Trig        Smart-looking: neat
            Dreigh        Tedious
            Cagey        A horse that is fresh
            Cat-wit        A troublesome critic
            Bully        Fine or excelling
            Drunted        Disappointed
            Silly        Shaky, unsubstantial
            Middling    Fairly
            Quie        A heifer calf
            Tidy        A cow or heifer with calf
            Curcuddiagh     Self-complacent or self-satisfied

            PS;  Does anybody have a Dog tracker/finder that they nolonger use? Maybe I could buy it from you.  My Boston Terrier keeps chasing rabbits, squirrels, birds, leaves, if it moves she chases it. She then gets lost and cannot find her way back out of the woods and just follows the first person she meets. I was looking on Ebay and Amazon but they do not ship to Europe.

            This link will give a general idea of the size of woodland. Bos and Bossen mean forest or woods in dutch.The Apartments have been refurbish since 2008 so this is an old photograph taken during the stage.

            Link: <http://maps. google.nl/ maps?q=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop-Mierlo&sll=49.853263, 10.578792&sspn=5.328664, 5.636233&hl=nl&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop,+ Mierlo,+Noord- Brabant&ll=51.425464, 5.583115&spn=0.006101, 0.017982&z=15&iwloc=A>


          • susanshira@aol.com
            The list is great fun. I printed it. Let s see, most of my ancestors on 3/4 of the sides are from ULster. Wm. Spence married Agnes Craig @ 1850 but his family
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              The list is great fun. I printed it.
              Let's see, most of my ancestors on 3/4 of the sides are from ULster.
              Wm. Spence married Agnes Craig @ 1850 but his family didn't approve because she was a serving maid in a pub so they were shipped off to Stoneboro, PA. They are my great-grand parents.
              Hugh Wilson, Elizabeth Hays and their sons came over from COunty Down before the Revolution and lived in Easton, PA before they moved west. All of their descendants have Scots names; Elder, Orr, CRaig, Mehard. Shira is a name from Alsace by way of Switzerland. He came over before the French and Indian War and after a couple of generations, they all married Scots-Irish women; MacAllen, McCoy, Spence, CRaig.
              I am mildly researching them all. I like to trace my grandmothers, and I can go back at least 5 generations on all the Ulster sides.
               
              Susan Wilson Shira NIlsen (my children's father is Norwegian)

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Gordon Crooks@... <gordoncrooks@...>
              To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thu, Dec 3, 2009 6:26 pm
              Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

               
              Basically I research Franklin Co, however I do look into Adams and Beaver from time to time. Also Westmoreland, Allegheny, and Venango. But I am not real knowledgeable about most of them except Franklin. In most cases I was chasing a Crooks. What also made it interesting is that by about 1750 there were about 6 Crooks families in western Pa. and I have long felt they were distantly related, plus the fact that they were often curious about other Crooks families and knew them etc.That plus I have often feld the two Crooks in the original Londonderry Plantation in 1621 were the parents of al or most of the 5 Crooks families found in Antrim in 1669, almost all of these families can be traced to Pa..
               
              Regarding the words and meanings yes I agree with you. I also wrote to the Rev.Nilsen privately as I think we know some kindred souls. I am also trying to locate one of those collars for dogs for Liam, my daughter sells and buys on E Bay. My eye sight is CRAPPY, dohas changed medications and I am doing hot wet surgical six times a day on the eye
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Thursday, December 03, 2009 7:33 PM
              Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealog y] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

               
              The list was fun to read, wasn't it?  I may have already asked you this - what area of PA and what surname are you researching?  My Burnsides moved from the Ballymena area to Beaver Co.

              Linda
              On Dec 3, 2009, at 8:44 AM, susanshira@aol. com wrote:


              I am from western Pennsylvania where the clergy like to say that "Presbyterians are denser than in any other part of the country."
              This is where many of the Ulster Scots moved when they arrived.
              I was surprised at how many of these words are still in common usage. Even tho my mother's  family had been here for generations, my father's grandparents were new arrivals and Ihave been familiar with these words on both sides.
               
              (Rev. Susan Shira Nilsen  
               



               
              -----Original Message-----
              From: L.G. McF <larneman@gmail. com>
              To: Linda's List <Mid-AntrimGenealogy @yahoogroups. com>; antrim <antrim@irishgenealo gy.net>
              Sent: Thu, Dec 3, 2009 10:45 am
              Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealog y] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

               
              The following collection of dialect words and phrases are still in fairly common use in many parts of Northern Ulster. They are very expressive, and are well worth preserving:-      
                
              Gunk        Disconcert
              Dayligone    Twilight
              Waghill        Walk laboriously
              Spraghel    Struggle as on soft ground
              Whamling    Overturning
              Cope-carley    Heels over head
              Kep        Stop
              Kye        Cows
              Kileery        Light-headed
              Tovy        Boastful
              Handling    Troublesome
              Garevitch    Disorderly gathering
              Cannot see a stime       Cannot see any
              Hain        Economise
              Footy        Mean, narrow
              Beddy        Impudent
              Birl        Turn round
              Sleekit        Crafty
              Spitting    Commencing to rain
              Deaf as a door nail    Very deaf
              Blind as a cleg        Very blind
              Thole        Suffer
              Stoor        Dust
              Oxtercog    Holding up by armpits
              Deil a hate    Nothing at all
              Clodding    Throwing stones or missiles
              Coom        Peat dust
              Thrawn        Cross-grained
              Gulpin        Ill-bred pretentious person
              Get the lees    Get into order
              Ar        Scar
              Fornenst    Opposite
              Gomey        Stupied person
              Baughill and Glunter    Awkward person
              Gype        Impudent person
              Mouth        Impudent, ignorant person
              Greeshough    Remains of peat fire
              Clabber and Glar    Mud
              Gar        Compel
              Slap        Gap in fence
              Be to be done    Must be done
              Gowling        Shouting
              Greeting and Roaring    Crying or weeping
              Donsey        Sickly
              Sca'd a Papish    Very hot
              Gopen        Full of both hands
              Just waiting on        A person dying
              Gye and bad        Very ill
              Lift your feet and they'll fall themselves    Hurry up
              Canny        Slow, deliberate
              Imperent    Impertinent
              Cracked        Slightly demented
              Crack        Chat
              Brash        An illness or a turn at the churn
              Kailying    Gossiping in neighbour's house
              Sail        Lift in a car
              Slithered away    Went slowly
              Never let on    Never tell
              Gappie        Stupid person
              Hap yourself    Roll yourself in the clothes
              Bravely        Well
              Hunker        Bend the knees
              Sonsy        Big, hearty
              Wee knowing and wee little        A little
              Dander        Walk
              Chew, dog    Don't bite
              Queer and well    Very suitable
              Skite        Slap with the hand
              Dwam        Fit of illness
              Well at himself    Rich: in good health
              Letting on    Pretending
              On for it    In favour of it
              Sconsing    Pretending
              Laired        Stuck in mud
              Crowdy        Mixed food of many ingredients
              Roytery        Rubbish
              Gral of a fellow    Youth
              Fadge        Potato cake
              Ram stam    In a forcible irregular manner
              Moily        Cow with no horns
              Shugly-shoo    See-saw
              Jostling    Pushing with the elbow
              Hashtyer    Careless untidy person
              Cogly        Unsteady
              Japs        Sparks of mud
              Blate        Bashful, quiet
              Girning        Complaining
              Gazeby        Big unsuitable house
              Bunker        Grass at side of road
              Colfing        Filling up
              Tirling        Blowing off the thatch
              Dooless        No energy
              Blubbering    Crying
              Strar        Part of cart harness
              Turry        Pig
              Tukey        Hen
              Droich or dhory    Smallest in the litter
              Scraighing    Shouting in hoarse voice
              Floostering    Making much of: fondling
              Clipe        Tell-tale
              Rodden or loanin    Bye road or path
              Spulpin        Scoundrel
              Throughother    Disorderly
              Getting into a pucker    Getting into a temper
              Thaveless    Without confidence: unsettled
              Jirging        Boots making a noise
              Kell        Dirt
              Kist        Chest or big box
              Yammering    Constant talk
              Guttery        Muddy
              Shilpit        Thin
              Cogged        Propped up
              At the leep    Half-boiled potatoes
              Dunt        To knock
              Striddling    Walking wide
              Camslush    Flattery
              Soft sodder    Too much praise
              Wee tory rogue    A little rascal
              Hurroosh    Outcry over very little
              Gawk        Awkward
              Slouster    A mess to eat
              Snigger        A smothered laugh
              White laugh    A derisive laugh
              Farnteckled    Freckled
              Sinnery        In two
              Duds        Clothes
              Lilt        A song
              Lauchter    A brood
              Skilted and skedaddled        Ran away
              Chay, lady    To quieten a restless cow
              Hardly fash    Not likely to do it
              Blethers    Nonsense
              Harned        Bakes (bread)
              Wee dight    A little clearing
              Arles        Money given to confirm a hiring contract
              Groak        Looking meanly for anything
              Sliddering    In a slow, gliding manner
              Kitchen        Meat diet
              Footer        Incapable of doing anything right
              Eileens        Two people of same age
              Smur        Fine rain
              Levat        A tirade
              Pisel        A slow worker
              Heart o' corn    A genial, entertaining person
              Colour or taste    A little
              Margymore    A disorderly show
              Crabbit        Cross
              Forbye        Besides
              Cant        Auction
              Kemp        Complete
              Nirr        Ill-grained person
              Dreigh        Slow
              Snedding turnips Trimming turnips
              Stoon        A dull aching pain
              Deave        Bore with talk
              Grist        Proper temperature
              Gave him all sorts    Gave him a severe scolding
              Never fash    Never trouble
              Dinnel        A painful feeling caused by cold
              Take it all its time    Doubtful
              Not up to much    Of inferior degree
              Hunker-sliding    Evading
              Sowans        Porridge made from shirings and oatmeal
              Beastings    The first milk of a cow, boiled
              Champ        Mashed potatoes and milk
              Crowdie and styaghie    Mess of food
              Meal a Crushy    Oatmeal fried with gravy
              Clart        Untidy woman
              Targe        Nagging, bad tempered woman
              Feardie        Coward
              Grulch        Short, squat person
              Dunch        Nudge with the elbow
              Ganch        Stammer
              Scrab        Scratch with the nail
              Scunner        Disgust
              Brust        Burst
              Skelly        Squint
              Hirple        Walk lamely
              Jorum        Good quality of fluid
              Bruchle        Roughness: a good handful
              Bruckle        Easily broken
              Blatter        A loud noise
              Tully-eyed    Squinting
              Dwam        A slight attack of illness
              To the bat of a stick    Exactly suitable
              Lashings and lavings    Plenty and to spare
              Stack of ribs    Emaciated person
              Brockies    Mountain sheep
              Creash        Grease
              Big        On friendly terms
              Balderdash    Nonsense
              Gullion        A quagmire
              Gowl        A shout
              Gidderell    A senseless person
              Skeigwig and skible    Two words of reproach
              Scoudered    Bread underbaked
              Skimpit        Pinched: not enough material
              Gallises    Braces for men's trousers
              Snash        Impudence
              Whups        Lots of
              Trig        Smart-looking: neat
              Dreigh        Tedious
              Cagey        A horse that is fresh
              Cat-wit        A troublesome critic
              Bully        Fine or excelling
              Drunted        Disappointed
              Silly        Shaky, unsubstantial
              Middling    Fairly
              Quie        A heifer calf
              Tidy        A cow or heifer with calf
              Curcuddiagh     Self-complacent or self-satisfied

              PS;  Does anybody have a Dog tracker/finder that they nolonger use? Maybe I could buy it from you.  My Boston Terrier keeps chasing rabbits, squirrels, birds, leaves, if it moves she chases it. She then gets lost and cannot find her way back out of the woods and just follows the first person she meets. I was looking on Ebay and Amazon but they do not ship to Europe.

              This link will give a general idea of the size of woodland. Bos and Bossen mean forest or woods in dutch.The Apartments have been refurbish since 2008 so this is an old photograph taken during the stage.

              Link: <http://maps. google.nl/ maps?q=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop-Mierlo&sll=49.853263, 10.578792&sspn=5.328664, 5.636233&hl=nl&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop,+ Mierlo,+Noord- Brabant&ll=51.425464, 5.583115&spn=0.006101, 0.017982&z=15&iwloc=A>




              No virus found in this incoming message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 8.5.426 / Virus Database: 270.14.91/2542 - Release Date: 12/03/09 07:32:00
            • Susan Morrison
              Hello Susan, I m in Christchurch New Zealand and am interested in the Spence you mentioned. My GGGrandmother was Nancy Spence, she married Samual Dickey, They
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Hello Susan,
                I'm in Christchurch New Zealand and am interested in the Spence you mentioned.
                My GGGrandmother was Nancy Spence, she married Samual Dickey, They immigrated to
                New Zealand in 1863. They left behind my GGrandmother Nancy Knox nee Dickey.
                Is this into any help to you, or to me
                Sue Morrison  (nee Knox)


                From: "susanshira@..." <susanshira@...>
                To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Fri, 4 December, 2009 2:52:00 PM
                Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealogy] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

                 

                The list is great fun. I printed it.
                Let's see, most of my ancestors on 3/4 of the sides are from ULster.
                Wm. Spence married Agnes Craig @ 1850 but his family didn't approve because she was a serving maid in a pub so they were shipped off to Stoneboro, PA. They are my great-grand parents.
                Hugh Wilson, Elizabeth Hays and their sons came over from COunty Down before the Revolution and lived in Easton, PA before they moved west. All of their descendants have Scots names; Elder, Orr, CRaig, Mehard. Shira is a name from Alsace by way of Switzerland. He came over before the French and Indian War and after a couple of generations, they all married Scots-Irish women; MacAllen, McCoy, Spence, CRaig.
                I am mildly researching them all. I like to trace my grandmothers, and I can go back at least 5 generations on all the Ulster sides.
                 
                Susan Wilson Shira NIlsen (my children's father is Norwegian)

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Gordon Crooks@verizon. net <gordoncrooks@ verizon.net>
                To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy @yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Thu, Dec 3, 2009 6:26 pm
                Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealog y] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

                 
                Basically I research Franklin Co, however I do look into Adams and Beaver from time to time. Also Westmoreland, Allegheny, and Venango. But I am not real knowledgeable about most of them except Franklin. In most cases I was chasing a Crooks. What also made it interesting is that by about 1750 there were about 6 Crooks families in western Pa. and I have long felt they were distantly related, plus the fact that they were often curious about other Crooks families and knew them etc.That plus I have often feld the two Crooks in the original Londonderry Plantation in 1621 were the parents of al or most of the 5 Crooks families found in Antrim in 1669, almost all of these families can be traced to Pa..
                 
                Regarding the words and meanings yes I agree with you. I also wrote to the Rev.Nilsen privately as I think we know some kindred souls. I am also trying to locate one of those collars for dogs for Liam, my daughter sells and buys on E Bay. My eye sight is CRAPPY, dohas changed medications and I am doing hot wet surgical six times a day on the eye
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Thursday, December 03, 2009 7:33 PM
                Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealog y] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

                 
                The list was fun to read, wasn't it?  I may have already asked you this - what area of PA and what surname are you researching?  My Burnsides moved from the Ballymena area to Beaver Co.

                Linda
                On Dec 3, 2009, at 8:44 AM, susanshira@aol. com wrote:


                I am from western Pennsylvania where the clergy like to say that "Presbyterians are denser than in any other part of the country."
                This is where many of the Ulster Scots moved when they arrived.
                I was surprised at how many of these words are still in common usage. Even tho my mother's  family had been here for generations, my father's grandparents were new arrivals and Ihave been familiar with these words on both sides.
                 
                (Rev. Susan Shira Nilsen  
                 



                 
                -----Original Message-----
                From: L.G. McF <larneman@gmail. com>
                To: Linda's List <Mid-AntrimGenealogy @yahoogroups. com>; antrim <antrim@irishgenealo gy.net>
                Sent: Thu, Dec 3, 2009 10:45 am
                Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealog y] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

                 
                The following collection of dialect words and phrases are still in fairly common use in many parts of Northern Ulster. They are very expressive, and are well worth preserving:-      
                  
                Gunk        Disconcert
                Dayligone    Twilight
                Waghill        Walk laboriously
                Spraghel    Struggle as on soft ground
                Whamling    Overturning
                Cope-carley    Heels over head
                Kep        Stop
                Kye        Cows
                Kileery        Light-headed
                Tovy        Boastful
                Handling    Troublesome
                Garevitch    Disorderly gathering
                Cannot see a stime       Cannot see any
                Hain        Economise
                Footy        Mean, narrow
                Beddy        Impudent
                Birl        Turn round
                Sleekit        Crafty
                Spitting    Commencing to rain
                Deaf as a door nail    Very deaf
                Blind as a cleg        Very blind
                Thole        Suffer
                Stoor        Dust
                Oxtercog    Holding up by armpits
                Deil a hate    Nothing at all
                Clodding    Throwing stones or missiles
                Coom        Peat dust
                Thrawn        Cross-grained
                Gulpin        Ill-bred pretentious person
                Get the lees    Get into order
                Ar        Scar
                Fornenst    Opposite
                Gomey        Stupied person
                Baughill and Glunter    Awkward person
                Gype        Impudent person
                Mouth        Impudent, ignorant person
                Greeshough    Remains of peat fire
                Clabber and Glar    Mud
                Gar        Compel
                Slap        Gap in fence
                Be to be done    Must be done
                Gowling        Shouting
                Greeting and Roaring    Crying or weeping
                Donsey        Sickly
                Sca'd a Papish    Very hot
                Gopen        Full of both hands
                Just waiting on        A person dying
                Gye and bad        Very ill
                Lift your feet and they'll fall themselves    Hurry up
                Canny        Slow, deliberate
                Imperent    Impertinent
                Cracked        Slightly demented
                Crack        Chat
                Brash        An illness or a turn at the churn
                Kailying    Gossiping in neighbour's house
                Sail        Lift in a car
                Slithered away    Went slowly
                Never let on    Never tell
                Gappie        Stupid person
                Hap yourself    Roll yourself in the clothes
                Bravely        Well
                Hunker        Bend the knees
                Sonsy        Big, hearty
                Wee knowing and wee little        A little
                Dander        Walk
                Chew, dog    Don't bite
                Queer and well    Very suitable
                Skite        Slap with the hand
                Dwam        Fit of illness
                Well at himself    Rich: in good health
                Letting on    Pretending
                On for it    In favour of it
                Sconsing    Pretending
                Laired        Stuck in mud
                Crowdy        Mixed food of many ingredients
                Roytery        Rubbish
                Gral of a fellow    Youth
                Fadge        Potato cake
                Ram stam    In a forcible irregular manner
                Moily        Cow with no horns
                Shugly-shoo    See-saw
                Jostling    Pushing with the elbow
                Hashtyer    Careless untidy person
                Cogly        Unsteady
                Japs        Sparks of mud
                Blate        Bashful, quiet
                Girning        Complaining
                Gazeby        Big unsuitable house
                Bunker        Grass at side of road
                Colfing        Filling up
                Tirling        Blowing off the thatch
                Dooless        No energy
                Blubbering    Crying
                Strar        Part of cart harness
                Turry        Pig
                Tukey        Hen
                Droich or dhory    Smallest in the litter
                Scraighing    Shouting in hoarse voice
                Floostering    Making much of: fondling
                Clipe        Tell-tale
                Rodden or loanin    Bye road or path
                Spulpin        Scoundrel
                Throughother    Disorderly
                Getting into a pucker    Getting into a temper
                Thaveless    Without confidence: unsettled
                Jirging        Boots making a noise
                Kell        Dirt
                Kist        Chest or big box
                Yammering    Constant talk
                Guttery        Muddy
                Shilpit        Thin
                Cogged        Propped up
                At the leep    Half-boiled potatoes
                Dunt        To knock
                Striddling    Walking wide
                Camslush    Flattery
                Soft sodder    Too much praise
                Wee tory rogue    A little rascal
                Hurroosh    Outcry over very little
                Gawk        Awkward
                Slouster    A mess to eat
                Snigger        A smothered laugh
                White laugh    A derisive laugh
                Farnteckled    Freckled
                Sinnery        In two
                Duds        Clothes
                Lilt        A song
                Lauchter    A brood
                Skilted and skedaddled        Ran away
                Chay, lady    To quieten a restless cow
                Hardly fash    Not likely to do it
                Blethers    Nonsense
                Harned        Bakes (bread)
                Wee dight    A little clearing
                Arles        Money given to confirm a hiring contract
                Groak        Looking meanly for anything
                Sliddering    In a slow, gliding manner
                Kitchen        Meat diet
                Footer        Incapable of doing anything right
                Eileens        Two people of same age
                Smur        Fine rain
                Levat        A tirade
                Pisel        A slow worker
                Heart o' corn    A genial, entertaining person
                Colour or taste    A little
                Margymore    A disorderly show
                Crabbit        Cross
                Forbye        Besides
                Cant        Auction
                Kemp        Complete
                Nirr        Ill-grained person
                Dreigh        Slow
                Snedding turnips Trimming turnips
                Stoon        A dull aching pain
                Deave        Bore with talk
                Grist        Proper temperature
                Gave him all sorts    Gave him a severe scolding
                Never fash    Never trouble
                Dinnel        A painful feeling caused by cold
                Take it all its time    Doubtful
                Not up to much    Of inferior degree
                Hunker-sliding    Evading
                Sowans        Porridge made from shirings and oatmeal
                Beastings    The first milk of a cow, boiled
                Champ        Mashed potatoes and milk
                Crowdie and styaghie    Mess of food
                Meal a Crushy    Oatmeal fried with gravy
                Clart        Untidy woman
                Targe        Nagging, bad tempered woman
                Feardie        Coward
                Grulch        Short, squat person
                Dunch        Nudge with the elbow
                Ganch        Stammer
                Scrab        Scratch with the nail
                Scunner        Disgust
                Brust        Burst
                Skelly        Squint
                Hirple        Walk lamely
                Jorum        Good quality of fluid
                Bruchle        Roughness: a good handful
                Bruckle        Easily broken
                Blatter        A loud noise
                Tully-eyed    Squinting
                Dwam        A slight attack of illness
                To the bat of a stick    Exactly suitable
                Lashings and lavings    Plenty and to spare
                Stack of ribs    Emaciated person
                Brockies    Mountain sheep
                Creash        Grease
                Big        On friendly terms
                Balderdash    Nonsense
                Gullion        A quagmire
                Gowl        A shout
                Gidderell    A senseless person
                Skeigwig and skible    Two words of reproach
                Scoudered    Bread underbaked
                Skimpit        Pinched: not enough material
                Gallises    Braces for men's trousers
                Snash        Impudence
                Whups        Lots of
                Trig        Smart-looking: neat
                Dreigh        Tedious
                Cagey        A horse that is fresh
                Cat-wit        A troublesome critic
                Bully        Fine or excelling
                Drunted        Disappointed
                Silly        Shaky, unsubstantial
                Middling    Fairly
                Quie        A heifer calf
                Tidy        A cow or heifer with calf
                Curcuddiagh     Self-complacent or self-satisfied

                PS;  Does anybody have a Dog tracker/finder that they nolonger use? Maybe I could buy it from you.  My Boston Terrier keeps chasing rabbits, squirrels, birds, leaves, if it moves she chases it. She then gets lost and cannot find her way back out of the woods and just follows the first person she meets. I was looking on Ebay and Amazon but they do not ship to Europe.

                This link will give a general idea of the size of woodland. Bos and Bossen mean forest or woods in dutch.The Apartments have been refurbish since 2008 so this is an old photograph taken during the stage.

                Link: <http://maps. google.nl/ maps?q=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop-Mierlo&sll=49.853263, 10.578792&sspn=5.328664, 5.636233&hl=nl&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop,+ Mierlo,+Noord- Brabant&ll=51.425464, 5.583115&spn=0.006101, 0.017982&z=15&iwloc=A>




                No virus found in this incoming message.
                Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                Version: 8.5.426 / Virus Database: 270.14.91/2542 - Release Date: 12/03/09 07:32:00

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              • Linda Holley
                Susan, Did you have any ELDER ancestors in Beaver/Lawrence in western PA? Linda
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 4, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  Susan,

                  Did you have any ELDER ancestors in Beaver/Lawrence in western PA?

                  Linda
                  On Dec 3, 2009, at 5:52 PM, susanshira@... wrote:


                  The list is great fun. I printed it.
                  Let's see, most of my ancestors on 3/4 of the sides are from ULster.
                  Wm. Spence married Agnes Craig @ 1850 but his family didn't approve because she was a serving maid in a pub so they were shipped off to Stoneboro, PA. They are my great-grand parents.
                  Hugh Wilson, Elizabeth Hays and their sons came over from COunty Down before the Revolution and lived in Easton, PA before they moved west. All of their descendants have Scots names; Elder, Orr, CRaig, Mehard. Shira is a name from Alsace by way of Switzerland. He came over before the French and Indian War and after a couple of generations, they all married Scots-Irish women; MacAllen, McCoy, Spence, CRaig.
                  I am mildly researching them all. I like to trace my grandmothers, and I can go back at least 5 generations on all the Ulster sides.
                   
                  Susan Wilson Shira NIlsen (my children's father is Norwegian)

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Gordon Crooks@verizon. net <gordoncrooks@ verizon.net>
                  To: Mid-AntrimGenealogy @yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Thu, Dec 3, 2009 6:26 pm
                  Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealog y] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

                   
                  Basically I research Franklin Co, however I do look into Adams and Beaver from time to time. Also Westmoreland, Allegheny, and Venango. But I am not real knowledgeable about most of them except Franklin. In most cases I was chasing a Crooks. What also made it interesting is that by about 1750 there were about 6 Crooks families in western Pa. and I have long felt they were distantly related, plus the fact that they were often curious about other Crooks families and knew them etc.That plus I have often feld the two Crooks in the original Londonderry Plantation in 1621 were the parents of al or most of the 5 Crooks families found in Antrim in 1669, almost all of these families can be traced to Pa..
                   
                  Regarding the words and meanings yes I agree with you. I also wrote to the Rev.Nilsen privately as I think we know some kindred souls. I am also trying to locate one of those collars for dogs for Liam, my daughter sells and buys on E Bay. My eye sight is CRAPPY, dohas changed medications and I am doing hot wet surgical six times a day on the eye
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Thursday, December 03, 2009 7:33 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Mid-AntrimGenealog y] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

                   
                  The list was fun to read, wasn't it?  I may have already asked you this - what area of PA and what surname are you researching?  My Burnsides moved from the Ballymena area to Beaver Co.

                  Linda
                  On Dec 3, 2009, at 8:44 AM, susanshira@aol. com wrote:


                  I am from western Pennsylvania where the clergy like to say that "Presbyterians are denser than in any other part of the country."
                  This is where many of the Ulster Scots moved when they arrived.
                  I was surprised at how many of these words are still in common usage. Even tho my mother's  family had been here for generations, my father's grandparents were new arrivals and Ihave been familiar with these words on both sides.
                   
                  (Rev. Susan Shira Nilsen  
                   



                   
                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: L.G. McF <larneman@gmail. com>
                  To: Linda's List <Mid-AntrimGenealogy @yahoogroups. com>; antrim <antrim@irishgenealo gy.net>
                  Sent: Thu, Dec 3, 2009 10:45 am
                  Subject: [Mid-AntrimGenealog y] Collection of dialect words and phrases of Northern Ulster

                   
                  The following collection of dialect words and phrases are still in fairly common use in many parts of Northern Ulster. They are very expressive, and are well worth preserving:-      
                    
                  Gunk        Disconcert
                  Dayligone    Twilight
                  Waghill        Walk laboriously
                  Spraghel    Struggle as on soft ground
                  Whamling    Overturning
                  Cope-carley    Heels over head
                  Kep        Stop
                  Kye        Cows
                  Kileery        Light-headed
                  Tovy        Boastful
                  Handling    Troublesome
                  Garevitch    Disorderly gathering
                  Cannot see a stime       Cannot see any
                  Hain        Economise
                  Footy        Mean, narrow
                  Beddy        Impudent
                  Birl        Turn round
                  Sleekit        Crafty
                  Spitting    Commencing to rain
                  Deaf as a door nail    Very deaf
                  Blind as a cleg        Very blind
                  Thole        Suffer
                  Stoor        Dust
                  Oxtercog    Holding up by armpits
                  Deil a hate    Nothing at all
                  Clodding    Throwing stones or missiles
                  Coom        Peat dust
                  Thrawn        Cross-grained
                  Gulpin        Ill-bred pretentious person
                  Get the lees    Get into order
                  Ar        Scar
                  Fornenst    Opposite
                  Gomey        Stupied person
                  Baughill and Glunter    Awkward person
                  Gype        Impudent person
                  Mouth        Impudent, ignorant person
                  Greeshough    Remains of peat fire
                  Clabber and Glar    Mud
                  Gar        Compel
                  Slap        Gap in fence
                  Be to be done    Must be done
                  Gowling        Shouting
                  Greeting and Roaring    Crying or weeping
                  Donsey        Sickly
                  Sca'd a Papish    Very hot
                  Gopen        Full of both hands
                  Just waiting on        A person dying
                  Gye and bad        Very ill
                  Lift your feet and they'll fall themselves    Hurry up
                  Canny        Slow, deliberate
                  Imperent    Impertinent
                  Cracked        Slightly demented
                  Crack        Chat
                  Brash        An illness or a turn at the churn
                  Kailying    Gossiping in neighbour's house
                  Sail        Lift in a car
                  Slithered away    Went slowly
                  Never let on    Never tell
                  Gappie        Stupid person
                  Hap yourself    Roll yourself in the clothes
                  Bravely        Well
                  Hunker        Bend the knees
                  Sonsy        Big, hearty
                  Wee knowing and wee little        A little
                  Dander        Walk
                  Chew, dog    Don't bite
                  Queer and well    Very suitable
                  Skite        Slap with the hand
                  Dwam        Fit of illness
                  Well at himself    Rich: in good health
                  Letting on    Pretending
                  On for it    In favour of it
                  Sconsing    Pretending
                  Laired        Stuck in mud
                  Crowdy        Mixed food of many ingredients
                  Roytery        Rubbish
                  Gral of a fellow    Youth
                  Fadge        Potato cake
                  Ram stam    In a forcible irregular manner
                  Moily        Cow with no horns
                  Shugly-shoo    See-saw
                  Jostling    Pushing with the elbow
                  Hashtyer    Careless untidy person
                  Cogly        Unsteady
                  Japs        Sparks of mud
                  Blate        Bashful, quiet
                  Girning        Complaining
                  Gazeby        Big unsuitable house
                  Bunker        Grass at side of road
                  Colfing        Filling up
                  Tirling        Blowing off the thatch
                  Dooless        No energy
                  Blubbering    Crying
                  Strar        Part of cart harness
                  Turry        Pig
                  Tukey        Hen
                  Droich or dhory    Smallest in the litter
                  Scraighing    Shouting in hoarse voice
                  Floostering    Making much of: fondling
                  Clipe        Tell-tale
                  Rodden or loanin    Bye road or path
                  Spulpin        Scoundrel
                  Throughother    Disorderly
                  Getting into a pucker    Getting into a temper
                  Thaveless    Without confidence: unsettled
                  Jirging        Boots making a noise
                  Kell        Dirt
                  Kist        Chest or big box
                  Yammering    Constant talk
                  Guttery        Muddy
                  Shilpit        Thin
                  Cogged        Propped up
                  At the leep    Half-boiled potatoes
                  Dunt        To knock
                  Striddling    Walking wide
                  Camslush    Flattery
                  Soft sodder    Too much praise
                  Wee tory rogue    A little rascal
                  Hurroosh    Outcry over very little
                  Gawk        Awkward
                  Slouster    A mess to eat
                  Snigger        A smothered laugh
                  White laugh    A derisive laugh
                  Farnteckled    Freckled
                  Sinnery        In two
                  Duds        Clothes
                  Lilt        A song
                  Lauchter    A brood
                  Skilted and skedaddled        Ran away
                  Chay, lady    To quieten a restless cow
                  Hardly fash    Not likely to do it
                  Blethers    Nonsense
                  Harned        Bakes (bread)
                  Wee dight    A little clearing
                  Arles        Money given to confirm a hiring contract
                  Groak        Looking meanly for anything
                  Sliddering    In a slow, gliding manner
                  Kitchen        Meat diet
                  Footer        Incapable of doing anything right
                  Eileens        Two people of same age
                  Smur        Fine rain
                  Levat        A tirade
                  Pisel        A slow worker
                  Heart o' corn    A genial, entertaining person
                  Colour or taste    A little
                  Margymore    A disorderly show
                  Crabbit        Cross
                  Forbye        Besides
                  Cant        Auction
                  Kemp        Complete
                  Nirr        Ill-grained person
                  Dreigh        Slow
                  Snedding turnips Trimming turnips
                  Stoon        A dull aching pain
                  Deave        Bore with talk
                  Grist        Proper temperature
                  Gave him all sorts    Gave him a severe scolding
                  Never fash    Never trouble
                  Dinnel        A painful feeling caused by cold
                  Take it all its time    Doubtful
                  Not up to much    Of inferior degree
                  Hunker-sliding    Evading
                  Sowans        Porridge made from shirings and oatmeal
                  Beastings    The first milk of a cow, boiled
                  Champ        Mashed potatoes and milk
                  Crowdie and styaghie    Mess of food
                  Meal a Crushy    Oatmeal fried with gravy
                  Clart        Untidy woman
                  Targe        Nagging, bad tempered woman
                  Feardie        Coward
                  Grulch        Short, squat person
                  Dunch        Nudge with the elbow
                  Ganch        Stammer
                  Scrab        Scratch with the nail
                  Scunner        Disgust
                  Brust        Burst
                  Skelly        Squint
                  Hirple        Walk lamely
                  Jorum        Good quality of fluid
                  Bruchle        Roughness: a good handful
                  Bruckle        Easily broken
                  Blatter        A loud noise
                  Tully-eyed    Squinting
                  Dwam        A slight attack of illness
                  To the bat of a stick    Exactly suitable
                  Lashings and lavings    Plenty and to spare
                  Stack of ribs    Emaciated person
                  Brockies    Mountain sheep
                  Creash        Grease
                  Big        On friendly terms
                  Balderdash    Nonsense
                  Gullion        A quagmire
                  Gowl        A shout
                  Gidderell    A senseless person
                  Skeigwig and skible    Two words of reproach
                  Scoudered    Bread underbaked
                  Skimpit        Pinched: not enough material
                  Gallises    Braces for men's trousers
                  Snash        Impudence
                  Whups        Lots of
                  Trig        Smart-looking: neat
                  Dreigh        Tedious
                  Cagey        A horse that is fresh
                  Cat-wit        A troublesome critic
                  Bully        Fine or excelling
                  Drunted        Disappointed
                  Silly        Shaky, unsubstantial
                  Middling    Fairly
                  Quie        A heifer calf
                  Tidy        A cow or heifer with calf
                  Curcuddiagh     Self-complacent or self-satisfied

                  PS;  Does anybody have a Dog tracker/finder that they nolonger use? Maybe I could buy it from you.  My Boston Terrier keeps chasing rabbits, squirrels, birds, leaves, if it moves she chases it. She then gets lost and cannot find her way back out of the woods and just follows the first person she meets. I was looking on Ebay and Amazon but they do not ship to Europe.

                  This link will give a general idea of the size of woodland. Bos and Bossen mean forest or woods in dutch.The Apartments have been refurbish since 2008 so this is an old photograph taken during the stage.

                  Link: <http://maps. google.nl/ maps?q=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop-Mierlo&sll=49.853263, 10.578792&sspn=5.328664, 5.636233&hl=nl&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Pieter+ Nuytsstraat+ 50,+5665+ Geldrop,+ Mierlo,+Noord- Brabant&ll=51.425464, 5.583115&spn=0.006101, 0.017982&z=15&iwloc=A>




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