Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Microscope] tips on buying

Expand Messages
  • Gordon Couger
    ... From: To: Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2001 11:02 PM Subject: [Microscope] tips on buying ... Buy a good
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 1, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <rockymau@...>
      To: <Microscope@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2001 11:02 PM
      Subject: [Microscope] tips on buying


      > I just started a veterinary pathology residency, and will be looking
      > at H&E stained slides primarily. I'm looking to buy a microscope for
      > home use.
      > 1. What are the disadvantages of achromatic objectives?
      > 2. What are pitfalls of purchasing an inexpensive binocular
      > microscope ($400-700)?
      > 3. Does anyone have any recommendations?

      Buy a good used scope and you can get your money back when you decide to
      trade up. Buy a new Asian import and you have nothing to trade in. Look on
      ebay to see what various used scopes bring. The new Asian scopes in that
      price range are extremely variable in quality and may not be able to be
      serviced if problems develop. While the discussion is on stereo microscopes
      what http://www.absoluteclarity.com/buy&avoid.htm has to say is of interest.
      The only thing is Russian Lomo compound scopes are a lot better than their
      stereo scopes. Other than that what say is pretty much on the money about
      the brands.

      The newer AO Spencer scopes are not as good quality as the old black ones.

      Your best bet would be to buy from a local source if they don't hold you up
      too bad. Dealers I know usualy ask $1,000 for a good used scope for a
      medical student. Remember that their asking price is not use the same as
      their taking price. You can probably buy a scope for half that on ebay but
      you run some risk. My luck has been pretty good on ebay be sure that the
      person you buy from is in the business of selling microscopes and has good
      feed back if you go that way.

      If you are not going to do photography though the scope you eye is not
      likely to notice much difference between good optics and the best optics but
      your pocket book will.

      Gordon

      Gordon Couger
      Stillwater, OK
      www.couger.com/gcouger
    • timgh62@aol.com
      I thought I would clarify a few things about objectives. There are some variations between manufacturers but generally; Achromatic objectives are corrected
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 1, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        I thought I would clarify a few things about objectives.
        There are some variations between manufacturers but generally;

        'Achromatic' objectives are corrected for two colors and can be
        used with 'non-compensating' eyepieces.
        'Plan' is a further correction to allow more of the field
        to be focused in the same plane of the specimen. This is most
        useful for photography, in visual use you can refocus slightly
        or move the slide sideways.
        'Flourite' lenses usually correct three colors.
        'Apochromatic' objectives are the most corrected, at least
        three colors as well as further corections for spherical, etc.

        Besides price, Flourite and Apo's usually require 'compensating'
        eyepieces. They usually have a greater N.A. which should increase
        resolution, but can have smaller working distance (between side
        and objective) and shallower depth of field.

        I would think the common achromatic objectives would be just
        fine. The mechanical aspects are very important also, and thats
        where its worth going with a quality manufacturer, as well as
        resell value. I would stick with a binocular 'scope, they are
        more comfortable to use over long periods.

        Tim

        --- In Microscope@y..., rockymau@y... wrote:
        > I just started a veterinary pathology residency, and will be
        looking
        > at H&E stained slides primarily. I'm looking to buy a microscope
        for
        > home use.
        > 1. What are the disadvantages of achromatic objectives?
        > 2. What are pitfalls of purchasing an inexpensive binocular
        > microscope ($400-700)?
        > 3. Does anyone have any recommendations?
        >
        > thanks!
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.