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Re: New member with vintage B&L Toolmakers' Microscope.

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  • pdworzan
    ... I wish I had the actual cutaway drawing for this particular eyepiece assembly to show what s involved, but I don t, so the best I can do is try to describe
    Message 1 of 21 , Mar 11, 2013
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      --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, <pjifl@...> wrote:
      >
      > > For example, the "inner locking ring (pic 2866)" you noted as requiring a
      > > spanner to remove it---well, that was my initial thought as well and I did
      > > make a quickie tool from scrap ( photo 2869). It fits the two holes in the
      > > ring perfectly and rotates the ring but it won't come out; the ring is a
      > > slip fit--it is not threaded--it will drift out until it hangs up on
      > > something, like a burr somewhere. The top surface of the ring is scarred.
      > > Someone tried to remove it with a pair of needle nose or snap ring pliers
      > > but slipped This part has obviously been abused (photo 2869 again).
      > >
      >
      > Could it be that the 'inner ring' is attached to a graticule and is
      > adjusted central by the jacking screws and rotated as required via the holes
      > before locking the jacking screws to hold it ?
      >
      > This does not explain how the upper and lower may be separated.
      >
      >
      > Peter Smith,
      >
      I wish I had the actual cutaway drawing for this particular eyepiece assembly to show what's involved, but I don't, so the best I can do is try to describe what I see. The first lens encountered on the scope can be removed by unscrewing it, exposing the inner ring (photo 2866).

      Within this inner ring there is yet another lens. I can see the single fiducial line of the upper reticle in the lens. This fiducial line rotates with the lens.

      The knurled body encasing this inner ring rotates a total of 45 degrees. It is restrained from rotating any further by a stud that is screwed through the wall of the body, engaging a slot in the wall of the lower half of the assembly (photos 2871, 2873).

      When the stud is removed, the inner ring can be rotated 360 degrees with a tooth pick stuck in one holes on the ring. There are four tiny screws around the perimeter of inner ring that appear to hold either the lens, or the upper reticle, or both. They may be pusher screws, too, I'm not sure. Two of these screws are barely visible at the top and bottom of the slot (photo 2874).

      As I mentioned in a previous reply, I have tried to remove this ring but encountered resistance. I think previous attempts to remove it resulted in raising a burr or a high spot somewhere on the ring, preventing it from sliding out. Unless I can be assured beyond a shadow of a doubt that there are no other screws or whatever holding the ring in, I'll leave well enough alone not take a chance of buggering up things more than they already are.

      And yes, I agree that this doesn't explain how the upper and lower halves may be separated. The only thing I can think of is that little swing clamp below the lower half. This clamp clamps the two half together, preventing them from rotating. When the clamp is loose, I can pull the two halves apart about 1/64". I have a hunch that the two halves are held together by the clamp. If the clamp were to be disassembled, the halves might separate. This is just an idea requiring more thought.

      By the way, photo 2875 shows the notched ring that I'm make a wrench for to reposition the eyepiece reticle/head assembly so it aligns squarely with the stage.
    • pjifl
      You will get there eventually. And it looks like a very useful microscope. NOW, this has nothing to do with your microscope but some may find it interesting.
      Message 2 of 21 , Mar 11, 2013
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        You will get there eventually. And it looks like a very useful microscope.

        NOW, this has nothing to do with your microscope but some may find it
        interesting.

        I do a lot of work on Telescopic Sights. Repairing and modifying even new
        ones.

        Some of these are top end quality.

        By far the worst problem is figuring out how to disassemble. This is
        probably worse in Telescopic Sights because they are sealed and meant to be
        rather hardy and not fall apart.

        Usually solvents are not enough and controlled heat has to be applied even
        after loosening grub screws and locking rings.
        One has to make heat shields to protect adjacent parts .

        One top brand - I could never figure out how to remove the eyepiece although
        the entire eyepiece bell was removable.

        I could not remove a locking band close to the end. Heat, torque, near
        heart attack, etc. but admitted defeat and hoped I would never have to get
        inside the eyepiece.

        Then one day for some reason on another specimen discovered by accident this
        locking ring was loose - AND IT WAS A LEFT HAND THREAD. I have never seen
        this on another riflescope.

        Knowledge worth hundreds of dollars !!!

        The manufacturers won't tell you anything of course.

        Peter Smith.
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