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Re: Defective Laptop Display Panels - Possible Source of Polarizing Film?????

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  • gerd_kircher
    Pete, I have tried to use LCD panels as polarizers with mixed results: - Peeling of the polarizing film from the glass panels. - Cut out useful disks from the
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 9 1:00 AM
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      Pete,

      I have tried to use LCD panels as polarizers with mixed results:
      - Peeling of the polarizing film from the glass panels.
      - Cut out useful disks from the glass panels+polarizing films.

      Peeling off the polarizing film works quite well, but the film is not clear. It also acts as diffuser.

      Cutting disks out from the glass panels adds 1 more problem:
      - The rear panel has the Red/Green/Blue pixel filter printed on it.
      - The front panel has a pixel grid printed on it.

      Both interfere with light transmission. Finally I gave it up after cutting up 2 LCD panels.

      The LCD liquid can be washed off easily. I do not know if it is toxic.

      Behind the LCD glass panels are a number of quite useful plastic sheets that act as diffuser for the LED or plasma back lighting.

      I hope this helps.
      Gerd


      --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "Pete W." <enwode@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi there, all,
      >
      > I recently replaced the display panel in a friend's lap-top (He'd dropped the computer and it became a tartan generator!)
      >
      > I know that an LCD panel works by twisting the plane of polarization of pre-polarized light. I wonder if this means such defective panels could usefully be 'mined' for their polarizing film?
      >
      > Possible problems: is the liquid crystal material toxic or hazardous or just prohibitively messy???
      >
      > In 'LED' screens, do the LEDs merely replace the cold-cathode back-lights or do they actually generate the light for each pixel?
      >
      > Might small segments of the electronic 'works' of these panels make interesting/useful microscopical subjects?
      >
      > Have any group members trod this path? I'd welcome members' views on this topic.
      >
      > Best regards,
      >
      > Pete W.
      > (aka 'Enwode')
      >
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