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Re: lighting for stereo microscope ?

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  • b28549
    ... General usage. Nothing specified, nothing excluded. Since I do this for pleasure, why should I exclude? Actually, I think I have found the answer. AmScope
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 3, 2010
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      --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "Microscopeman" <microscopeman@...> wrote:
      >
      > What kind of sample? What magnification? What working distance? Visual
      > work only, or digital photomicrography? Light-absorbing sample, or
      > light-reflecting sample?
      >
      General usage. Nothing specified, nothing excluded. Since I do this for pleasure, why should I exclude? Actually, I think I have found the answer. AmScope has a ring light with separately controllable banks. Thus my fear of totally flat lighting is avoided.
    • Microscopeman
      I prefer ringlights (fiber optic or LED) for even, homogenous, shadow-free illumination on 3-dimensional samples. The LED rings with selectable sectors work
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 3, 2010
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        I prefer ringlights (fiber optic or LED) for even, homogenous, shadow-free
        illumination on 3-dimensional samples.

        The LED rings with selectable sectors work well, but they do not replace a
        bifurcated fiber optic (or LED) source. With a gooseneck, you can adjust
        the angle of incidence from perpindicular to "grazing" incidence (>15
        degrees or so). In this case, you can highlight surface topography that
        will not be visually apparent with either ring illuminator mentioned
        previously.

        However, if you are starting out, and want something simple and
        multi-purpose, the segmented LED ring would be a good start.

        Good luck,

        Gregg


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "b28549" <morepub@...>
        To: <Microscope@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, July 03, 2010 7:32 PM
        Subject: [Microscope] Re: lighting for stereo microscope ?


        > --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "Microscopeman" <microscopeman@...>
        > wrote:
        >>
        >> What kind of sample? What magnification? What working distance? Visual
        >> work only, or digital photomicrography? Light-absorbing sample, or
        >> light-reflecting sample?
        >>
        > General usage. Nothing specified, nothing excluded. Since I do this for
        > pleasure, why should I exclude? Actually, I think I have found the answer.
        > AmScope has a ring light with separately controllable banks. Thus my fear
        > of totally flat lighting is avoided.
      • John
        I acquired a led ring light recently after wanting one for some time. It can be set all on or either side on. Very disappointed plenty of light but all images
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 4, 2010
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          I acquired a led ring light recently after wanting one for some time. It can be set all on or either side on. Very disappointed plenty of light but all images look flat. I find a separate rather small microscope lamp a lot better. These are likely to be hard to find but there are a number of high powered led lamps about that have a flexible neck. It would be rather nice to find one with a focusable beam just like most microscope lamps have.

          John

          --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "b28549" <morepub@...> wrote:
          >
          > Is a ring light the best option? I am concerned about loss of perceived depth of field, due to the omnidirectional flatness a ring light would provide.
          >
        • TWC
          I have led ring lights which allow you to turn off certain sections and give you a better modeling effect instead of the normal flat lighting of the full ring.
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 4, 2010
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            I have led ring lights which allow you to turn off certain sections and give you a better modeling effect instead of the normal flat lighting of the full ring.
            Ted

            --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "John" <a.johnw@...> wrote:
            >
            > I acquired a led ring light recently after wanting one for some time. It can be set all on or either side on. Very disappointed plenty of light but all images look flat. I find a separate rather small microscope lamp a lot better. These are likely to be hard to find but there are a number of high powered led lamps about that have a flexible neck. It would be rather nice to find one with a focusable beam just like most microscope lamps have.
            >
            > John
            >
            > --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "b28549" <morepub@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Is a ring light the best option? I am concerned about loss of perceived depth of field, due to the omnidirectional flatness a ring light would provide.
            > >
            >
          • DonH
            I have both ringlights and gooseneck lights. The ringlight is nice because it is easy to use and always attached to the nose of the scope. However, I have
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 4, 2010
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              I have both ringlights and gooseneck lights. The ringlight is nice because it is easy to use and always attached to the nose of the scope. However, I have found the lighting to be flat, no matter what I try to do as far as blocking off portions of the ring, etc. In contrast, I find the gooseneck lights to be more versatile and flexible. You can get a unit with an iris in the lamp house, as well as positions for filters; you can buy focusing tips and polarizing filters for the ends, and you can use rice paper as a diffuser if needed. You can do anything from grazing incident light to top-down light. You can also position the ends as close or as far to the specimen as you like; with a ringlight, the distance is fixed.

              I look at a lot of micromount minerals, which by definition are crystals that can only be appreciated under magnification. These are often contained in odd matrices, so it is necessary for me to position the fiber ends in odd angles in order to get the best contrast and color. Your needs may vary.

              Auction sites such as eBay or LabX contain many offerings of used fiber optic lights from trusted vendors such as Schott Fostec or Dolan Jenner.

              Good luck,
              Don
            • siburning
              ... I ve found it useful to have several ligthing options and use them together. Goosenecks at various angles are great for showing scratches and shadows, and
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 4, 2010
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                --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, DonH <djhmis@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > I have both ringlights and gooseneck lights. The ringlight is nice because it is easy to use and always attached to the nose of the scope. However, I have found the lighting to be flat, no matter what I try to do as far as blocking off portions of the ring, etc. In contrast, I find the gooseneck lights to be more versatile and flexible. You can get a unit with an iris in the lamp house, as well as positions for filters; you can buy focusing tips and polarizing filters for the ends, and you can use rice paper as a diffuser if needed. You can do anything from grazing incident light to top-down light. You can also position the ends as close or as far to the specimen as you like; with a ringlight, the distance is fixed.
                >
                > I look at a lot of micromount minerals, which by definition are crystals that can only be appreciated under magnification. These are often contained in odd matrices, so it is necessary for me to position the fiber ends in odd angles in order to get the best contrast and color. Your needs may vary.
                >
                > Auction sites such as eBay or LabX contain many offerings of used fiber optic lights from trusted vendors such as Schott Fostec or Dolan Jenner.
                >
                > Good luck,
                > Don
                >
                I've found it useful to have several ligthing options and use them together. Goosenecks at various angles are great for showing scratches and shadows, and the images vary quite a lot with different angles, but some additional diffuse background lighting often helps in showing the context or what else is also there. To use a ring light like this, it needs to have variable light output. Mind doesn't have much range, so I often just aim a desk lamp in the general vicinity.
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