Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [Microscope] Re: Popularity of Amateur Astronomy vs. Microscopy

Expand Messages
  • Dale J. Chatham
    Might I ask a rather simple question? What sparked your interest in microscopy? Astronomy? When I was 4, my mother bought me a microscope for Christmas. When
    Message 1 of 62 , Sep 1, 2006
      Might I ask a rather simple question?

      What sparked your interest in microscopy? Astronomy?

      When I was 4, my mother bought me a microscope for Christmas. When I
      was 5, it was a telescope. Both instruments would go for less than $100
      today. However, I was immediately hooked on both.

      My point is, each and every one of us is empowered to spark this
      interest in the next generation. In fact, I'd submit that we are
      *responsible* for this in the next generation (or second).

      So, why not take some action, even if it is somewhat limited. The
      tobacco companies knew/know when to hook the next generation, why not
      take their lead?

      too_many_tools wrote:

      >Very good question.
      >
      >I have interests in both areas as I suspect many of us do.
      >
      >I think the emphasis on astronomy in the United States is because of
      >the Space program.
      >
      >I also note that my impression is that microscopy has a stronger
      >following in Great Britian...and the reason why?
      >
      >The sad thing is that I see fewer and fewer kids interested in either
      >hobby than I did years ago.
      >
      >TMT
      >
      >
      >
    • gordoncouger
      Hi Jim, I am at loss for worm problems in camelids but a quick read shows its a big one in alpacas in white tail deer county where a lung worm in white tail
      Message 62 of 62 , Oct 8, 2009
        Hi Jim,

        I am at loss for worm problems in camelids but a quick read shows its a big one in alpacas in white tail deer county where a lung worm in white tail deer become a dead end parasite in alpacas that attack the spinal cord an brain showing no symptoms other than neurological problems after the parasite invade the nervous system. As there is now way to test alpacas for that parasite in areas with this problem they need monthly doses of Ivermectin to kill any white tail deer lung worm that they might have picked up by eating an infected snail.

        They seem to be animals that will graze grass very short and in an urban setting or small pastures grazing close to the ground and close to piles of dung are a sure recipe for getting worms in numbers that that normal annual or Mimi annual worming used for most other stock are not often enough. The drugs used to kill worms are not with out consequences for the alpaca and can build tolerance in the parasites they treat when used too often or used at sub lethal doses to the parasite at high frequency use. Combine those very real risks with the not unwarranted growing concern leading many producers to use as few drugs as they can, the real cost of the drugs, and growing cost of veterinary services with the falling price of microscopes and the easy of finding information on how to preform the procedures and you have a market the retired doctor is meeting.

        Others are doing their own parasite counts for many reasons. It may be cost, the availability of professionals or the lack of anyone that can even do it. They are cattlemen and those that keep and raise horses, birds, bees, snakes lizards fish and other stock down to the those raising the smallest creatures as Johnath Swift observed,"So, naturalists observe, a flea Has smaller fleas that on him prey; And these have smaller still to bite 'em; And so proceed ad infinitum."

        Swift probably best captured the whole of nature in the least words of any on in that quote everything lives on something else down to the smallest creatures that draw live from chemical reactions and energy and feed the flea above them in the chain.

        Gordon

        --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, Kirkpletho@... wrote:
        >
        > Nic, Gordon, et al.
        >
        >
        >
        > Another example similar to the bee keepers .... ? Many small alpaca farms in the Pacific Northwest are getting their own microscopes to perform fecal exams on their animals. ?There is even a retired physician-alpaca-farmer who sells microscopes at alpaca shows. ?There are several reasons for this trend. ?One is the problem with parasite resistance to traditional worming medications. ?Rather than treating the entire herd twice a year or more, people are starting to do regular fecal exams and are treating only those animals with high parasite loads. ?A second reason is the cost of having a vet perform fecal exams -- if you want to examine your entire herd every month or two, it can get pretty expensive. ?Several people who have bought their own scopes have expressed interest in looking at pond water, etc. ?I've encouraged them to do so.?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Jim Kirk
        >
        > Washington, USA
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.