Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Questions about some older Zeiss objectives

Expand Messages
  • rvanwezel
    Hi Steve, Ap. means aperture, not apochromatic. 90/1.30 HI was actually a typical apochromat Zeiss design, don t know whether Zeiss Winkel used it as well.
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 11, 2004
      Hi Steve,

      Ap. means aperture, not apochromatic.
      90/1.30 HI was actually a typical apochromat Zeiss design, don't know
      whether Zeiss Winkel used it as well.
      High NA's were actually quite common in old achromat lenses, and it
      is also common for polarization scope objectives. BTW, many plan
      semiapo's (eg Wild) have similar NA to the achro series.

      David Walker describes a similar lens to your 42* in Micscape, he
      also says it's an apo. Haven't seen the prove, but you might ask him.
      Wonderfull set of lenses anyway, don't worry about the apo/achro
      difference. For the topbrands it is minimal, trust me.

      HTH, Rene.

      --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "psneeley2003" <psneeley@e...>
      wrote:
      >
      > If anyone knows Zeiss objectives, perhaps they would comment on the
      > following;
      >
      > Zeiss Winkel objectives.
      > H.I.90 Ap. 1,30;
      > 10 ap. 0,25;
      > 30 ap.0,60;
      > 42 ap. 0,85
      >
      > I know that the Zeiss Winkel name was only used by Zeiss between
      1946
      > and 1954, so this dates the objectives I would suppose. They are
      > paired with a 6x and 12x eyepiece (this is a monocular scope) -- no
      > markings on the eypeices although they are long as if compensating.
      >
      > 1. So does 'AP.' mean apochromatic?
      >
      > I see that the 90x is in the flourite/apochromat range. The 42x
      > clearly seems apochromatic per its N.A.; the 30x is in the
      > flourite/apochromatic range -- but the 10x at only 0.25 seems quite
      > low (achromat).
      >
      > 2. If 'Ap.' means Apochromat, why would the 10x's N.A. be so low
      > (s/b .30 or higher)?
      >
      > BTW, these are black-barrel objectives with a silver tip.
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Steve
    • psneeley2003
      Thanks Rene! I wondered if it meant aperature. These are new (old stock) so I m afraid to use them -- I may end up just looking at them rather than through
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 11, 2004
        Thanks Rene! I wondered if it meant aperature. These are new (old
        stock) so I'm afraid to use them -- I may end up just looking at
        them rather than through them ;-)

        My nightmare: "AO Spencer guy mucks up pristine Zeiss lenses, News
        at 11:00!!"

        Steve

        --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "rvanwezel" <renevanwezel@h...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hi Steve,
        >
        > Ap. means aperture, not apochromatic.
        > 90/1.30 HI was actually a typical apochromat Zeiss design, don't
        know
        > whether Zeiss Winkel used it as well.
        > High NA's were actually quite common in old achromat lenses, and
        it
        > is also common for polarization scope objectives. BTW, many plan
        > semiapo's (eg Wild) have similar NA to the achro series.
        >
        > David Walker describes a similar lens to your 42* in Micscape, he
        > also says it's an apo. Haven't seen the prove, but you might ask
        him.
        > Wonderfull set of lenses anyway, don't worry about the apo/achro
        > difference. For the topbrands it is minimal, trust me.
        >
        > HTH, Rene.
        >
        > --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "psneeley2003" <psneeley@e...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > If anyone knows Zeiss objectives, perhaps they would comment on
        the
        > > following;
        > >
        > > Zeiss Winkel objectives.
        > > H.I.90 Ap. 1,30;
        > > 10 ap. 0,25;
        > > 30 ap.0,60;
        > > 42 ap. 0,85
        > >
        > > I know that the Zeiss Winkel name was only used by Zeiss between
        > 1946
        > > and 1954, so this dates the objectives I would suppose. They
        are
        > > paired with a 6x and 12x eyepiece (this is a monocular scope) --
        no
        > > markings on the eypeices although they are long as if
        compensating.
        > >
        > > 1. So does 'AP.' mean apochromatic?
        > >
        > > I see that the 90x is in the flourite/apochromat range. The 42x
        > > clearly seems apochromatic per its N.A.; the 30x is in the
        > > flourite/apochromatic range -- but the 10x at only 0.25 seems
        quite
        > > low (achromat).
        > >
        > > 2. If 'Ap.' means Apochromat, why would the 10x's N.A. be so low
        > > (s/b .30 or higher)?
        > >
        > > BTW, these are black-barrel objectives with a silver tip.
        > >
        > > Thanks,
        > >
        > > Steve
      • emeylan
        Steve, I have a pdf file which explain pretty well how carl zeiss describe their objective. Unfortunately, the group files is full. I was not able to upload
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 11, 2004
          Steve,
          I have a pdf file which explain pretty well how carl zeiss describe
          their objective.
          Unfortunately, the group "files" is full.
          I was not able to upload it.
          But if you send me an email private i can attach this file to your
          email
          :-) emile


          --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "psneeley2003" <psneeley@e...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Thanks Rene! I wondered if it meant aperature. These are new
          (old
          > stock) so I'm afraid to use them -- I may end up just looking at
          > them rather than through them ;-)
          >
          > My nightmare: "AO Spencer guy mucks up pristine Zeiss lenses,
          News
          > at 11:00!!"
          >
          > Steve
          >
          > --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "rvanwezel" <renevanwezel@h...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi Steve,
          > >
          > > Ap. means aperture, not apochromatic.
          > > 90/1.30 HI was actually a typical apochromat Zeiss design, don't
          > know
          > > whether Zeiss Winkel used it as well.
          > > High NA's were actually quite common in old achromat lenses, and
          > it
          > > is also common for polarization scope objectives. BTW, many plan
          > > semiapo's (eg Wild) have similar NA to the achro series.
          > >
          > > David Walker describes a similar lens to your 42* in Micscape,
          he
          > > also says it's an apo. Haven't seen the prove, but you might ask
          > him.
          > > Wonderfull set of lenses anyway, don't worry about the apo/achro
          > > difference. For the topbrands it is minimal, trust me.
          > >
          > > HTH, Rene.
          > >
          > > --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "psneeley2003"
          <psneeley@e...>
          > > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > If anyone knows Zeiss objectives, perhaps they would comment
          on
          > the
          > > > following;
          > > >
          > > > Zeiss Winkel objectives.
          > > > H.I.90 Ap. 1,30;
          > > > 10 ap. 0,25;
          > > > 30 ap.0,60;
          > > > 42 ap. 0,85
          > > >
          > > > I know that the Zeiss Winkel name was only used by Zeiss
          between
          > > 1946
          > > > and 1954, so this dates the objectives I would suppose. They
          > are
          > > > paired with a 6x and 12x eyepiece (this is a monocular scope) -
          -
          > no
          > > > markings on the eypeices although they are long as if
          > compensating.
          > > >
          > > > 1. So does 'AP.' mean apochromatic?
          > > >
          > > > I see that the 90x is in the flourite/apochromat range. The
          42x
          > > > clearly seems apochromatic per its N.A.; the 30x is in the
          > > > flourite/apochromatic range -- but the 10x at only 0.25 seems
          > quite
          > > > low (achromat).
          > > >
          > > > 2. If 'Ap.' means Apochromat, why would the 10x's N.A. be so
          low
          > > > (s/b .30 or higher)?
          > > >
          > > > BTW, these are black-barrel objectives with a silver tip.
          > > >
          > > > Thanks,
          > > >
          > > > Steve
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.