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Re: [Microscope] Re: Collotheca rotifers

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  • James Solliday
    Dear Charlie: Wow, fantastic images of the Rotifer... great exposure control as well as composition... You were able to get a few images freezing the subject,
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 1, 2004
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      Dear Charlie:
      Wow, fantastic images of the Rotifer... great exposure control as well
      as composition... You were able to get a few images freezing the
      subject, hard to do with Rotifers, they tend to be very active.
      Good job... Sincerely, Jim :-)
      *************

      Charlie <sberk5@...> wrote:
      Ron,

      I too found a few of these a couple weeks ago. They were in a water
      sample taken from small pond that is well on it's way to becoming a
      bog here in western WA. I have no idea how common they are. I've
      posted a few pictures of the ones I found at:

      http://c-krebs.home.comcast.net/0003/rotifindex.html

      Take care,

      Charlie




      --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "ronneumeyer" <ronneumeyer@y...> wrote:
      > A few weeks back I came across some very interesting examples of the
      > Collotheca rotifers. While exploring the excellent forums on Tom's
      > amateur microscopy net I found that Graham had posted an outstanding
      > pic of this rotifer, and had uploaded more of his pics at this URL:
      >
      > http://www.gpmatthews.nildram.co.uk/animalcules/collotheca/index1.htm
      >
      > After searching electronic and print sources for more info on the
      > Collotheca I found relatively little information, suggesting it a
      > rather rare. Have others in this group found examples? Mine were
      > taken from a local bog, the water of which is high in organic
      > content and relatively acidic � suggesting that this Order may have
      > a preference for such environments. My Collotheca "culture" has
      > since collapsed, but prior to that I was able to capture a number of
      > images using various illumination techniques. Following Graham's
      > example I have uploaded the better ones to this URL:
      >
      > http://www.microimaging.ca/Collotheca/index.html
      >
      > All the best,
      > Ron


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    • Graham Matthews
      Charlie, I agree that the sheath can be very difficult to see. Under darkground illumination you can often see it, if faintly. Your pictures are excellent -
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 1, 2004
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        Charlie,

        I agree that the sheath can be very difficult to see. Under
        darkground illumination you can often see it, if faintly.

        Your pictures are excellent - strangely, I didn't actually try
        bright field when I took mine, but will try again soon, as I appear
        to have a pond full of these creatures.

        - glad to see I seem to have sparked some interest in this unusual
        rotifer.

        All the best,

        Graham

        --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "Charlie" <sberk5@y...> wrote:
        > Ron,
        >
        > Funny you should mention the "large gelatinous case". I was playing
        > around with oblique illumination for some of these pictures. (I
        envy
        > your phase contrast pictures - those are really nice) I found this
        > critter tough to photograph... very transparent. I was trying
        various
        > aperture "offsets" and in one instance this gelatinous case became
        > quite apparent. I went back and found those images and have
        > substituted them for two similar images on the page
        > http://c-krebs.home.comcast.net/0003/rotifindex.html
        >
        > If you have a chance, take a look at the last two images and see if
        > that's what you are referring to. It is indeed incredibly faint. I
        > could not see it at all with regular BF illumination.
        >
        > As I mentioned, some of these were taken with oblique illumination.
        > I'm using a 10x Oly D-Apo, a 20x Oly D-PlanApo, and a 40X and 100X
        > Meiji. The 40x and 100X came with the (lightly used) scope when I
        > bought it. I've been looking to upgrade these, but the images they
        > give actually look pretty good.
        >
        > I'm using my Canon 10D body with a 2.5x Oly projection lens on the
        > trinoc.
        >
        >
        >
      • ronneumeyer
        Hi Graham, You raise an important point in regard to brightfield illumination (I consider oblique as BF). I my view, the various forms of optically induced
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 1, 2004
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          Hi Graham,

          You raise an important point in regard to brightfield illumination
          (I consider oblique as BF). I my view, the various forms of
          optically induced contrast enhancement, such as phase and DIC, are
          valuable tools for a variety of subjects. Nevertheless, when it
          comes to exploring the world of aquatic micro flora and fauna,
          properly adjusted brightfield is hard to beat.

          A good example is a medium size rotifer or ciliate. It has been my
          experience that critical comparison (i.e. ignoring the "wow" factor)
          between BF and other types of illumination will generally lead one
          to conclude that BF provides a superior image (more useful
          information) in respect to detail, colour and structure. In other
          words phase contrast, etc. are techniques supplementary to BF
          illumination, rather then the other way around if pond life is your
          interest. After running the gambit of optical techniques I now find
          myself using BF about 70% of the time. In fact, if one uses a proper
          DF condenser (rather than using an Abbe with stops in the filter
          carrier), phase and DIC techniques are not really needed for pond
          life exploration.

          Charlie's superb pictures have renewed my interest in oblique
          illumination, a technique that was very popular many years ago. To
          me his pictures also point out the value of investing in a small set
          of high end objectives (rather then several nosepieces jammed with a
          mix of objectives), and in keeping the oblique angle to a minimum.

          Food for thought.

          All the best,
          Ron


          --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "Graham Matthews" <micro1@g...>
          wrote:
          > Charlie,
          >
          > I agree that the sheath can be very difficult to see. Under
          > darkground illumination you can often see it, if faintly.
          >
          > Your pictures are excellent - strangely, I didn't actually try
          > bright field when I took mine, but will try again soon, as I
          appear
          > to have a pond full of these creatures.
          >
          > - glad to see I seem to have sparked some interest in this unusual
          > rotifer.
          >
          > All the best,
          >
          > Graham
          >
          > --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "Charlie" <sberk5@y...> wrote:
          > > Ron,
          > >
          > > Funny you should mention the "large gelatinous case". I was
          playing
          > > around with oblique illumination for some of these pictures. (I
          > envy
          > > your phase contrast pictures - those are really nice) I found
          this
          > > critter tough to photograph... very transparent. I was trying
          > various
          > > aperture "offsets" and in one instance this gelatinous case
          became
          > > quite apparent. I went back and found those images and have
          > > substituted them for two similar images on the page
          > > http://c-krebs.home.comcast.net/0003/rotifindex.html
          > >
          > > If you have a chance, take a look at the last two images and see
          if
          > > that's what you are referring to. It is indeed incredibly faint.
          I
          > > could not see it at all with regular BF illumination.
          > >
          > > As I mentioned, some of these were taken with oblique
          illumination.
          > > I'm using a 10x Oly D-Apo, a 20x Oly D-PlanApo, and a 40X and
          100X
          > > Meiji. The 40x and 100X came with the (lightly used) scope when I
          > > bought it. I've been looking to upgrade these, but the images
          they
          > > give actually look pretty good.
          > >
          > > I'm using my Canon 10D body with a 2.5x Oly projection lens on
          the
          > > trinoc.
          > >
          > >
          > >
        • Charlie
          Jim, Thanks! Actually this particular rotifer posed quite nicely, hardly moving anything once fully extended. But you re right, most rotifers pose a
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 2, 2004
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            Jim,

            Thanks! Actually this particular rotifer posed quite nicely, hardly
            moving anything once fully extended.

            But you're right, most rotifers pose a considerable motion problem.
            Especially if you're curious about what's going on with those
            whirling cilia. When I set up my scope a couple months ago I rigged
            up electronic flash to help stop motion. Eventually I hope to
            organize and annotate some of the pictures I've taken. For the time
            being I've put up a couple photos here if you're interested:

            http://c-krebs.home.comcast.net/0004/index.html

            All the best,

            Charlie


            --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, James Solliday <oldscope@y...>
            wrote:
            > Dear Charlie:
            > Wow, fantastic images of the Rotifer... great exposure control as
            well
            > as composition... You were able to get a few images freezing the
            > subject, hard to do with Rotifers, they tend to be very active.
            > Good job... Sincerely, Jim :-)
            > *************
            >
            > Charlie <sberk5@y...> wrote:
            > Ron,
            >
            > I too found a few of these a couple weeks ago. They were in a water
            > sample taken from small pond that is well on it's way to becoming a
            > bog here in western WA. I have no idea how common they are. I've
            > posted a few pictures of the ones I found at:
            >
            > http://c-krebs.home.comcast.net/0003/rotifindex.html
            >
            > Take care,
            >
            > Charlie
            >
          • James Solliday
            Dear Charlie: Outstanding images!!! your flash technique is very helpful and the compositions are quite informative. Good work indeed. You seem to do well
            Message 5 of 15 , Jun 2, 2004
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              Dear Charlie:
              Outstanding images!!! your flash technique is very helpful and
              the compositions are quite informative. Good work indeed.
              You seem to do well acquiring good samples with nice specimens.
              Again, very nice and a joy to see... Sincerely, Jim :-)
              ********

              Charlie <sberk5@...> wrote:
              Jim,

              Thanks! Actually this particular rotifer posed quite nicely, hardly
              moving anything once fully extended.

              But you're right, most rotifers pose a considerable motion problem.
              Especially if you're curious about what's going on with those
              whirling cilia. When I set up my scope a couple months ago I rigged
              up electronic flash to help stop motion. Eventually I hope to
              organize and annotate some of the pictures I've taken. For the time
              being I've put up a couple photos here if you're interested:

              http://c-krebs.home.comcast.net/0004/index.html

              All the best,

              Charlie


              --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, James Solliday <oldscope@y...>
              wrote:
              > Dear Charlie:
              > Wow, fantastic images of the Rotifer... great exposure control as
              well
              > as composition... You were able to get a few images freezing the
              > subject, hard to do with Rotifers, they tend to be very active.
              > Good job... Sincerely, Jim :-)
              > *************
              >
              > Charlie <sberk5@y...> wrote:
              > Ron,
              >
              > I too found a few of these a couple weeks ago. They were in a water
              > sample taken from small pond that is well on it's way to becoming a
              > bog here in western WA. I have no idea how common they are. I've
              > posted a few pictures of the ones I found at:
              >
              > http://c-krebs.home.comcast.net/0003/rotifindex.html
              >
              > Take care,
              >
              > Charlie
              >



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            • J. Forster
              Speaking of strobes for microscopes, I have a Zeiss lamp house for my UEM with a Xenon strobe bulb in it (made by Strobex). There is no other lamp, so does
              Message 6 of 15 , Jun 2, 2004
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                Speaking of strobes for microscopes, I have a Zeiss lamp house for my UEM with a
                Xenon strobe bulb in it (made by Strobex). There is no other lamp, so does
                anyone know how it might have been used? I imaging focusing etc. would be pretty
                hard using just a strobe for illumination. BTW, the UEM is a large frame
                instrument, with separate lamp houses for transmitted and reflected
                illumination. Any ideas?

                Thanks,
                -John

                James Solliday wrote:

                > Dear Charlie:
                > Outstanding images!!! your flash technique is very helpful and
                > the compositions are quite informative. Good work indeed.
                > You seem to do well acquiring good samples with nice specimens.
                > Again, very nice and a joy to see... Sincerely, Jim :-)
                > ********
              • Bob S.
                More than likely that Zeiss made an adapter to attach more than one lamp house to each light port on that frame or another that used the same lamp houses. Bob
                Message 7 of 15 , Jun 2, 2004
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                  More than likely that Zeiss made an adapter to attach more than one
                  lamp house to each light port on that frame or another that used the
                  same lamp houses.


                  Bob

                  --- In Microscope@yahoogroups.com, "J. Forster" <jfor@q...> wrote:
                  > Speaking of strobes for microscopes, I have a Zeiss lamp house for
                  my UEM with a
                  > Xenon strobe bulb in it (made by Strobex). There is no other lamp,
                  so does
                  > anyone know how it might have been used? I imaging focusing etc.
                  would be pretty
                  > hard using just a strobe for illumination. BTW, the UEM is a large
                  frame
                  > instrument, with separate lamp houses for transmitted and reflected
                  > illumination. Any ideas?
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  > -John
                  >
                  > James Solliday wrote:
                  >
                  > > Dear Charlie:
                  > > Outstanding images!!! your flash technique is very helpful and
                  > > the compositions are quite informative. Good work indeed.
                  > > You seem to do well acquiring good samples with nice specimens.
                  > > Again, very nice and a joy to see... Sincerely, Jim :-)
                  > > ********
                • Frez
                  ... my UEM with a ... so does ... would be pretty ... frame ... Hi John You should be able to use one lamp source for focusing and then switch over to the
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jun 2, 2004
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                    > Speaking of strobes for microscopes, I have a Zeiss lamp house for
                    my UEM with a
                    > Xenon strobe bulb in it (made by Strobex). There is no other lamp,
                    so does
                    > anyone know how it might have been used? I imaging focusing etc.
                    would be pretty
                    > hard using just a strobe for illumination. BTW, the UEM is a large
                    frame
                    > instrument, with separate lamp houses for transmitted and reflected
                    > illumination. Any ideas?
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    > -John

                    Hi John

                    You should be able to use one lamp source for focusing and then
                    switch over to the strobe. The task will be syncronizing the imaging
                    device to the flash.

                    Frez
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