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RE: [MN] beetroot

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  • Bagrowski, Randall M RDECOM
    Not to rain on anyone s parade but.... I I ve fermented Beets and was very disappointed in the results. They tasted a lot like dirt!. These were my own beets
    Message 1 of 21 , Nov 1, 2004
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      Not to rain on anyone's parade but.... I I've fermented Beets and was very
      disappointed in the results. They tasted a lot like dirt!. These were my own
      beets that I grew and that tasted great ( before I fermented them!)

      If someone does try them, let me know. I'm curious to see if someone else
      gets different results.

      Randy
      (NE Maryland)

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Michael Anton Parker [mailto:michaelantonparker@...]
      Sent: Sunday, October 31, 2004 3:03 PM
      To: microbial_nutrition@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot


      @@@ Jackie:
      > I am new to this and would like to try fermenting beetroot. Does any body
      > have a recipe on how to make it.
      @@@

      Hi Jackie,
      The only experience I have is adding beetroot in some batches of my
      winter kimchi last year. In some batches I put chunks, and in others
      I put shredded beetroot. It seemed to work fine, but with kimchi you
      can pretty much put anything in and have it work fine, so I didn't
      think much of it!

      The NT recipe for beet kvass mentions that it's better to use chunks
      instead of grated beetroot if you want to minimize the alcohol. I
      suppose that's because the greater surface area of the sugar sources
      will drive the fermentation in a different direction. I'm a little
      fuzzy on this topic, so I hope to learn more about it from others.

      I suppose what you have in mind is in-between these two things
      (beetroot as minor ingredient in kimchi and a beetroot beverage),
      where it's just beetroot eaten as beetroot... My guess is that since
      there is so much sugar in beetroot it will be very easy to get a
      ferment going, using the standard techniques like adding some salt
      and/or whey and letting it sit out for a few days or so. Say, I'm
      curious; I think I'll try some batches this week and see what happens.
      I wonder how it will be aged for several months? With it's unique
      sugar content, this is a unique and interesting fermented veggie
      topic!

      Mike Parker
      SE Pennsylvania

      The best way to predict the future is to invent it. --Alan Kay


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    • Terry L. Smith
      Randy-- I ve had disappointing experiences with Beets too. It seemed like an easy natural, but I guess not. My first basic batch was still hard as a rock a
      Message 2 of 21 , Nov 1, 2004
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        Randy--
        I've had disappointing experiences with Beets too. It seemed like an easy natural, but I guess not. My first basic batch was still hard as a rock a year later, and was one of those experiments that I just could not save or recycle successfully, so the compost heap got it. I thought maybe it was because they were yellow beets, but I don't see that much difference in the red ones either. You must have to do some specific pre-treatment to get those sugars to respond the way you want.

        Ended up finally doing a raw vinegar/brown sugar/cinnamon/EM/molasses thing, and it turned out with a much better taste.
        I baby french-fried the cuts instead of trying slices or shreds, as the cut with these seems to really matter for some reason.
        If that was a bust, my next move was to try some sort of Thai thing with a yellow curry, applesauce and coconut thing going on.

        Hey, I'm after some flavor here, and not just a Ferment.... Baking before hand, and rubbing the skins just didn't seem the way to go, but.... So many recipes about pickling, or "harvarding", (even a puree), but not much else might mean something from all those ancestral cooks, ......laughing at us from beyooond the grave.... Late Happy Halloween.
        For what it's worth.
        --Terry

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Bagrowski, Randall M RDECOM
        To: 'Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com'
        Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 6:14 AM
        Subject: RE: [MN] beetroot



        Not to rain on anyone's parade but.... I I've fermented Beets and was very
        disappointed in the results. They tasted a lot like dirt!. These were my own
        beets that I grew and that tasted great ( before I fermented them!)

        If someone does try them, let me know. I'm curious to see if someone else
        gets different results.

        Randy
        (NE Maryland)

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Michael Anton Parker [mailto:michaelantonparker@...]
        Sent: Sunday, October 31, 2004 3:03 PM
        To: microbial_nutrition@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot


        @@@ Jackie:
        > I am new to this and would like to try fermenting beetroot. Does any body have a recipe on how to make it.
        @@@

        Hi Jackie,
        The only experience I have is adding beetroot in some batches of my winter kimchi last year. In some batches I put chunks, and in others I put shredded beetroot. It seemed to work fine, but with kimchi you can pretty much put anything in and have it work fine, so I didn't think much of it!

        The NT recipe for beet kvass mentions that it's better to use chunks instead of grated beetroot if you want to minimize the alcohol. I suppose that's because the greater surface area of the sugar sources will drive the fermentation in a different direction. I'm a little fuzzy on this topic, so I hope to learn more about it from others.

        I suppose what you have in mind is in-between these two things (beetroot as minor ingredient in kimchi and a beetroot beverage), where it's just beetroot eaten as beetroot... My guess is that since there is so much sugar in beetroot it will be very easy to get a ferment going, using the standard techniques like adding some salt and/or whey and letting it sit out for a few days or so. Say, I'm curious; I think I'll try some batches this week and see what happens.

        I wonder how it will be aged for several months? With it's unique sugar content, this is a unique and interesting fermented veggie topic!

        Mike Parker
        SE Pennsylvania

        The best way to predict the future is to invent it. --Alan Kay

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Beau & Shani
        Hey Beet-Junkies, I steamed some beetroot slices once and then put them in a jar with kefir brine (1/2 tsp.salt, 1/2 cup whey and 1/2 cup water) They molded
        Message 3 of 21 , Nov 1, 2004
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          Hey Beet-Junkies,
          I steamed some beetroot slices once and then put them in a jar with "kefir brine" (1/2 tsp.salt, 1/2 cup whey and 1/2 cup water)
          They molded on the top in 24 hrs. so I composted mine too.
          It sounds like such a tasty thing but all of the sugars must encourage a different fermentation. Maybe vinegar is needed?
          Good Topic! Hope we hear from a beet pro.
          Beau B.
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Terry L. Smith
          To: Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 5:39 AM
          Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot


          Randy--
          I've had disappointing experiences with Beets too. It seemed like an easy natural, but I guess not. My first basic batch was still hard as a rock a year later, and was one of those experiments that I just could not save or recycle successfully, so the compost heap got it. I thought maybe it was because they were yellow beets, but I don't see that much difference in the red ones either. You must have to do some specific pre-treatment to get those sugars to respond the way you want.

          Ended up finally doing a raw vinegar/brown sugar/cinnamon/EM/molasses thing, and it turned out with a much better taste.
          I baby french-fried the cuts instead of trying slices or shreds, as the cut with these seems to really matter for some reason.
          If that was a bust, my next move was to try some sort of Thai thing with a yellow curry, applesauce and coconut thing going on.

          Hey, I'm after some flavor here, and not just a Ferment.... Baking before hand, and rubbing the skins just didn't seem the way to go, but.... So many recipes about pickling, or "harvarding", (even a puree), but not much else might mean something from all those ancestral cooks, ......laughing at us from beyooond the grave.... Late Happy Halloween.
          For what it's worth.
          --Terry

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Bagrowski, Randall M RDECOM
          To: 'Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com'
          Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 6:14 AM
          Subject: RE: [MN] beetroot



          Not to rain on anyone's parade but.... I I've fermented Beets and was very
          disappointed in the results. They tasted a lot like dirt!. These were my own
          beets that I grew and that tasted great ( before I fermented them!)

          If someone does try them, let me know. I'm curious to see if someone else
          gets different results.

          Randy
          (NE Maryland)

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Michael Anton Parker [mailto:michaelantonparker@...]
          Sent: Sunday, October 31, 2004 3:03 PM
          To: microbial_nutrition@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot


          @@@ Jackie:
          > I am new to this and would like to try fermenting beetroot. Does any body have a recipe on how to make it.
          @@@

          Hi Jackie,
          The only experience I have is adding beetroot in some batches of my winter kimchi last year. In some batches I put chunks, and in others I put shredded beetroot. It seemed to work fine, but with kimchi you can pretty much put anything in and have it work fine, so I didn't think much of it!

          The NT recipe for beet kvass mentions that it's better to use chunks instead of grated beetroot if you want to minimize the alcohol. I suppose that's because the greater surface area of the sugar sources will drive the fermentation in a different direction. I'm a little fuzzy on this topic, so I hope to learn more about it from others.

          I suppose what you have in mind is in-between these two things (beetroot as minor ingredient in kimchi and a beetroot beverage), where it's just beetroot eaten as beetroot... My guess is that since there is so much sugar in beetroot it will be very easy to get a ferment going, using the standard techniques like adding some salt and/or whey and letting it sit out for a few days or so. Say, I'm curious; I think I'll try some batches this week and see what happens.

          I wonder how it will be aged for several months? With it's unique sugar content, this is a unique and interesting fermented veggie topic!

          Mike Parker
          SE Pennsylvania

          The best way to predict the future is to invent it. --Alan Kay

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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        • Teresa Blazey
          Hi all, I just found a quart of lacto-fermented beets--made according to the NT recipe: baked, then peeled and cut into matchsticks--down in my cold storage
          Message 4 of 21 , Nov 1, 2004
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            Hi all,
            I just found a quart of lacto-fermented beets--made according to the
            NT recipe: baked, then peeled and cut into matchsticks--down in my
            cold storage room. They look perfectly good, but I know they're about
            6-7 mos. old. Sorry, inquiring minds, but I'm not ready to bust 'em
            out yet--I've got too many jars in the fridge... who wants to persuade
            me?
            Teresa B.


            On Mon, 1 Nov 2004 08:56:21 -0800, Beau & Shani
            <evolvingcreations@...> wrote:
            > Hey Beet-Junkies,
            > I steamed some beetroot slices once and then put them in a jar with "kefir
            > brine" (1/2 tsp.salt, 1/2 cup whey and 1/2 cup water)
            > They molded on the top in 24 hrs. so I composted mine too.
            > It sounds like such a tasty thing but all of the sugars must encourage a
            > different fermentation. Maybe vinegar is needed?
            > Good Topic! Hope we hear from a beet pro.
            > Beau B.
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Terry L. Smith
            > To: Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 5:39 AM
            > Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot
            >
            >
            > Randy--
            > I've had disappointing experiences with Beets too. It seemed like an
            > easy natural, but I guess not. My first basic batch was still hard as a
            > rock a year later, and was one of those experiments that I just could not
            > save or recycle successfully, so the compost heap got it. I thought maybe
            > it was because they were yellow beets, but I don't see that much difference
            > in the red ones either. You must have to do some specific pre-treatment to
            > get those sugars to respond the way you want.
            >
            > Ended up finally doing a raw vinegar/brown sugar/cinnamon/EM/molasses
            > thing, and it turned out with a much better taste.
            > I baby french-fried the cuts instead of trying slices or shreds, as the
            > cut with these seems to really matter for some reason.
            > If that was a bust, my next move was to try some sort of Thai thing with
            > a yellow curry, applesauce and coconut thing going on.
            >
            > Hey, I'm after some flavor here, and not just a Ferment.... Baking
            > before hand, and rubbing the skins just didn't seem the way to go, but....
            > So many recipes about pickling, or "harvarding", (even a puree), but not
            > much else might mean something from all those ancestral cooks,
            > ......laughing at us from beyooond the grave.... Late Happy Halloween.
            > For what it's worth.
            > --Terry
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Bagrowski, Randall M RDECOM
            > To: 'Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com'
            > Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 6:14 AM
            > Subject: RE: [MN] beetroot
            >
            >
            >
            > Not to rain on anyone's parade but.... I I've fermented Beets and was
            > very
            > disappointed in the results. They tasted a lot like dirt!. These were
            > my own
            > beets that I grew and that tasted great ( before I fermented them!)
            >
            > If someone does try them, let me know. I'm curious to see if someone
            > else
            > gets different results.
            >
            > Randy
            > (NE Maryland)
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Michael Anton Parker [mailto:michaelantonparker@...]
            > Sent: Sunday, October 31, 2004 3:03 PM
            > To: microbial_nutrition@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot
            >
            >
            > @@@ Jackie:
            > > I am new to this and would like to try fermenting beetroot. Does any
            > body have a recipe on how to make it.
            > @@@
            >
            > Hi Jackie,
            > The only experience I have is adding beetroot in some batches of my
            > winter kimchi last year. In some batches I put chunks, and in others I put
            > shredded beetroot. It seemed to work fine, but with kimchi you can pretty
            > much put anything in and have it work fine, so I didn't think much of it!
            >
            > The NT recipe for beet kvass mentions that it's better to use chunks
            > instead of grated beetroot if you want to minimize the alcohol. I suppose
            > that's because the greater surface area of the sugar sources will drive the
            > fermentation in a different direction. I'm a little fuzzy on this topic, so
            > I hope to learn more about it from others.
            >
            > I suppose what you have in mind is in-between these two things
            > (beetroot as minor ingredient in kimchi and a beetroot beverage), where it's
            > just beetroot eaten as beetroot... My guess is that since there is so much
            > sugar in beetroot it will be very easy to get a ferment going, using the
            > standard techniques like adding some salt and/or whey and letting it sit out
            > for a few days or so. Say, I'm curious; I think I'll try some batches this
            > week and see what happens.
            >
            > I wonder how it will be aged for several months? With it's unique
            > sugar content, this is a unique and interesting fermented veggie topic!
            >
            > Mike Parker
            > SE Pennsylvania
            >
            > The best way to predict the future is to invent it. --Alan Kay
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
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          • John
            I have made lacto-fermented beets following the NT recipe. I didn t really like them, but the beet kvass from NT was pretty good. John Teresa Blazey
            Message 5 of 21 , Nov 1, 2004
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              I have made lacto-fermented beets following the NT recipe. I didn't really like them, but the beet kvass from NT was pretty good.

              John

              Teresa Blazey <teresa.blazey@...> wrote:
              Hi all,
              I just found a quart of lacto-fermented beets--made according to the
              NT recipe: baked, then peeled and cut into matchsticks--down in my
              cold storage room. They look perfectly good, but I know they're about
              6-7 mos. old. Sorry, inquiring minds, but I'm not ready to bust 'em
              out yet--I've got too many jars in the fridge... who wants to persuade
              me?
              Teresa B.


              On Mon, 1 Nov 2004 08:56:21 -0800, Beau & Shani
              <evolvingcreations@...> wrote:
              > Hey Beet-Junkies,
              > I steamed some beetroot slices once and then put them in a jar with "kefir
              > brine" (1/2 tsp.salt, 1/2 cup whey and 1/2 cup water)
              > They molded on the top in 24 hrs. so I composted mine too.
              > It sounds like such a tasty thing but all of the sugars must encourage a
              > different fermentation. Maybe vinegar is needed?
              > Good Topic! Hope we hear from a beet pro.
              > Beau B.
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Terry L. Smith
              > To: Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 5:39 AM
              > Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot
              >
              >
              > Randy--
              > I've had disappointing experiences with Beets too. It seemed like an
              > easy natural, but I guess not. My first basic batch was still hard as a
              > rock a year later, and was one of those experiments that I just could not
              > save or recycle successfully, so the compost heap got it. I thought maybe
              > it was because they were yellow beets, but I don't see that much difference
              > in the red ones either. You must have to do some specific pre-treatment to
              > get those sugars to respond the way you want.
              >
              > Ended up finally doing a raw vinegar/brown sugar/cinnamon/EM/molasses
              > thing, and it turned out with a much better taste.
              > I baby french-fried the cuts instead of trying slices or shreds, as the
              > cut with these seems to really matter for some reason.
              > If that was a bust, my next move was to try some sort of Thai thing with
              > a yellow curry, applesauce and coconut thing going on.
              >
              > Hey, I'm after some flavor here, and not just a Ferment.... Baking
              > before hand, and rubbing the skins just didn't seem the way to go, but....
              > So many recipes about pickling, or "harvarding", (even a puree), but not
              > much else might mean something from all those ancestral cooks,
              > ......laughing at us from beyooond the grave.... Late Happy Halloween.
              > For what it's worth.
              > --Terry
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Bagrowski, Randall M RDECOM
              > To: 'Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com'
              > Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 6:14 AM
              > Subject: RE: [MN] beetroot
              >
              >
              >
              > Not to rain on anyone's parade but.... I I've fermented Beets and was
              > very
              > disappointed in the results. They tasted a lot like dirt!. These were
              > my own
              > beets that I grew and that tasted great ( before I fermented them!)
              >
              > If someone does try them, let me know. I'm curious to see if someone
              > else
              > gets different results.
              >
              > Randy
              > (NE Maryland)
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Michael Anton Parker [mailto:michaelantonparker@...]
              > Sent: Sunday, October 31, 2004 3:03 PM
              > To: microbial_nutrition@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot
              >
              >
              > @@@ Jackie:
              > > I am new to this and would like to try fermenting beetroot. Does any
              > body have a recipe on how to make it.
              > @@@
              >
              > Hi Jackie,
              > The only experience I have is adding beetroot in some batches of my
              > winter kimchi last year. In some batches I put chunks, and in others I put
              > shredded beetroot. It seemed to work fine, but with kimchi you can pretty
              > much put anything in and have it work fine, so I didn't think much of it!
              >
              > The NT recipe for beet kvass mentions that it's better to use chunks
              > instead of grated beetroot if you want to minimize the alcohol. I suppose
              > that's because the greater surface area of the sugar sources will drive the
              > fermentation in a different direction. I'm a little fuzzy on this topic, so
              > I hope to learn more about it from others.
              >
              > I suppose what you have in mind is in-between these two things
              > (beetroot as minor ingredient in kimchi and a beetroot beverage), where it's
              > just beetroot eaten as beetroot... My guess is that since there is so much
              > sugar in beetroot it will be very easy to get a ferment going, using the
              > standard techniques like adding some salt and/or whey and letting it sit out
              > for a few days or so. Say, I'm curious; I think I'll try some batches this
              > week and see what happens.
              >
              > I wonder how it will be aged for several months? With it's unique
              > sugar content, this is a unique and interesting fermented veggie topic!
              >
              > Mike Parker
              > SE Pennsylvania
              >
              > The best way to predict the future is to invent it. --Alan Kay
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              >
              > Get unlimited calls to
              >
              > U.S./Canada
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Microbial_Nutrition/
              >
              > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > Microbial_Nutrition-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              > Service.
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              >
              > ADVERTISEMENT
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
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              >
              > To visit your group on the web, go to:
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              >
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            • Terry L. Smith
              Teresa..... You re baiting us.... Break open that baby, and report back. Even the Little House Cookbook recipe for Beetroot ... (Beet Pickle, p 136) is cooked
              Message 6 of 21 , Nov 1, 2004
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                Teresa.....
                You're baiting us....
                Break open that baby, and report back.

                Even the Little House Cookbook recipe for Beetroot ... (Beet Pickle, p 136) is cooked and in a sugar/vinegar brine. Lots of sugar/vinegar ferments back then. Maybe that's where the Wilted Lettuce Salads came from...?

                I guess salad dressing the way we know it is French, and became popular only after the Civil War, when they started importing olive oil.
                --Terry

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Teresa Blazey
                To: microbial_nutrition@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 3:43 PM
                Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot



                Hi all,
                I just found a quart of lacto-fermented beets--made according to the NT recipe: baked, then peeled and cut into matchsticks--down in my cold storage room. They look perfectly good, but I know they're about 6-7 mos. old. Sorry, inquiring minds, but I'm not ready to bust 'em out yet--I've got too many jars in the fridge... who wants to persuade me?
                Teresa B.


                On Mon, 1 Nov 2004 08:56:21 -0800, Beau & Shani
                <evolvingcreations@...> wrote:
                > Hey Beet-Junkies,
                > I steamed some beetroot slices once and then put them in a jar with "kefir brine" (1/2 tsp.salt, 1/2 cup whey and 1/2 cup water)
                > They molded on the top in 24 hrs. so I composted mine too.
                > It sounds like such a tasty thing but all of the sugars must encourage a different fermentation. Maybe vinegar is needed?
                > Good Topic! Hope we hear from a beet pro.
                > Beau B.
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: Terry L. Smith
                > To: Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 5:39 AM
                > Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot
                >
                >
                > Randy--
                > I've had disappointing experiences with Beets too. It seemed like an
                > easy natural, but I guess not. My first basic batch was still hard as a
                > rock a year later, and was one of those experiments that I just could not
                > save or recycle successfully, so the compost heap got it. I thought maybe
                > it was because they were yellow beets, but I don't see that much difference
                > in the red ones either. You must have to do some specific pre-treatment to
                > get those sugars to respond the way you want.
                >
                > Ended up finally doing a raw vinegar/brown sugar/cinnamon/EM/molasses
                > thing, and it turned out with a much better taste.
                > I baby french-fried the cuts instead of trying slices or shreds, as the
                > cut with these seems to really matter for some reason.
                > If that was a bust, my next move was to try some sort of Thai thing with
                > a yellow curry, applesauce and coconut thing going on.
                >
                > Hey, I'm after some flavor here, and not just a Ferment.... Baking
                > before hand, and rubbing the skins just didn't seem the way to go, but....
                > So many recipes about pickling, or "harvarding", (even a puree), but not
                > much else might mean something from all those ancestral cooks,
                > ......laughing at us from beyooond the grave.... Late Happy Halloween.
                > For what it's worth.
                > --Terry
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: Bagrowski, Randall M RDECOM
                > To: 'Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com'
                > Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 6:14 AM
                > Subject: RE: [MN] beetroot
                >
                >
                >
                > Not to rain on anyone's parade but.... I I've fermented Beets and was
                > very
                > disappointed in the results. They tasted a lot like dirt!. These were
                > my own
                > beets that I grew and that tasted great ( before I fermented them!)
                >
                > If someone does try them, let me know. I'm curious to see if someone
                > else
                > gets different results.
                >
                > Randy
                > (NE Maryland)
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Michael Anton Parker [mailto:michaelantonparker@...]
                > Sent: Sunday, October 31, 2004 3:03 PM
                > To: microbial_nutrition@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot
                >
                >
                > @@@ Jackie:
                > > I am new to this and would like to try fermenting beetroot. Does any
                > body have a recipe on how to make it.
                > @@@
                >
                > Hi Jackie,
                > The only experience I have is adding beetroot in some batches of my
                > winter kimchi last year. In some batches I put chunks, and in others I put
                > shredded beetroot. It seemed to work fine, but with kimchi you can pretty
                > much put anything in and have it work fine, so I didn't think much of it!
                >
                > The NT recipe for beet kvass mentions that it's better to use chunks
                > instead of grated beetroot if you want to minimize the alcohol. I suppose
                > that's because the greater surface area of the sugar sources will drive the
                > fermentation in a different direction. I'm a little fuzzy on this topic, so
                > I hope to learn more about it from others.
                >
                > I suppose what you have in mind is in-between these two things
                > (beetroot as minor ingredient in kimchi and a beetroot beverage), where it's
                > just beetroot eaten as beetroot... My guess is that since there is so much
                > sugar in beetroot it will be very easy to get a ferment going, using the
                > standard techniques like adding some salt and/or whey and letting it sit out
                > for a few days or so. Say, I'm curious; I think I'll try some batches this
                > week and see what happens.
                >
                > I wonder how it will be aged for several months? With it's unique
                > sugar content, this is a unique and interesting fermented veggie topic!
                >
                > Mike Parker
                > SE Pennsylvania


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • fg227
                I am a strong believer in not cooking what you will be fermenting. If you have a Green Power or Champion juicer, juice the beets. Mix the juice back with the
                Message 7 of 21 , Nov 1, 2004
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                  I am a strong believer in not cooking what you will be fermenting.

                  If you have a Green Power or Champion juicer, juice the beets.
                  Mix the juice back with the pulp
                  Outside refrigerator for 3 days
                  Then inside refrigerator to mature.
                  I make saltless but you can use salt
                  Basement temperatures are likely too high for such a finely cut up vegetable ferment

                  For beets fermented same as traditional sauerkraut, cut up beets, add salt and treat it like making cabbage sauerkraut. Will mature at basement temperatures but take longer than cabbage



                  Dan




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                • Rachel Adler
                  I m glad to see this discussion! I just made beet kvass (from NT) for the first time, and it tastes rather like dirt! I used organic beets (chopped fine), whey
                  Message 8 of 21 , Nov 2, 2004
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                    I'm glad to see this discussion! I just made beet kvass (from NT) for
                    the first time, and it tastes rather like dirt! I used organic beets
                    (chopped fine), whey from my goat kefir, and organic sea salt. It was
                    fermenting for 5 days - it needed that much time to do anything. Even
                    so, I'm not sure if it needed more time.

                    Yuck.

                    Rachel
                  • Deb
                    I made the NT recipe, but left the beets in the oven too long, so they were really shrivelled. It was hard to get the skin off, and I didn t have much too work
                    Message 9 of 21 , Nov 2, 2004
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                      I made the NT recipe, but left the beets in the oven too long, so they
                      were really shrivelled. It was hard to get the skin off, and I didn't
                      have much too work with. Although I reduced the salt, they were quite
                      salty, but OK. That was a couple of weeks ago, and they've been
                      sitting at the back of the fridge since then. I just went and had a
                      taste and they were a bit less salty, but didn;t have the tang of
                      commercial beetroot.

                      My next batch I boiled instead of baking them, still in their skins,
                      with the tops and tails still on. They were much easier to peel.
                      Because the last lot were too salty I reduced the salt. Mistake! The
                      first thing I noticed when I opened the jar was that it seemed to be
                      fizzing, so I wondered if I;d made alcohol. But when I tasted them
                      they were quite tasteless, so i was disappointed. Just went and had a
                      taste of those after a week in the fridge - they taste kinda fizzy but
                      with no discernable beetroot flavour. I turned some into a beetroot
                      spread with crispy walnuts, cultured cream and parsley, which the OH
                      liked, but I think that was the cream and the walnuts. Although it was
                      beautifully pink, it wasn't that beetrooty tasting.

                      If I try them again, I;d boil rather than bake, go back to the amount
                      of salt in the NT recipe, and ferment them in a jar that let air out
                      but not in. (Rather than an airtight one). But since Ilve already got
                      two jars of beetroot and hardly ever eat it, the next trial might be
                      auite a long time away.

                      deb

                      --- In Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com, jackie liddell
                      <j4ck1e01050@y...> wrote:
                      > Hi
                      >
                      > I am new to this and would like to try fermenting beetroot. Does any
                      body have a recipe on how to make it.
                      >
                      > Thanks
                      >
                      > Jackie
                    • mcguinne5@aol.com
                      I would suggest that kraut be fermented 3 more weeks. Then put it in qt. jars and store in fridge. It will not have the necessary proper qualities you are
                      Message 10 of 21 , Nov 28, 2005
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                        I would suggest that kraut be fermented 3 more weeks.

                        Then put it in qt. jars and store in fridge.

                        It will not have the necessary proper qualities you are looking for
                        if you don't ferment at least 3 to 5 weeks.

                        It takes patience to ferment kraut. You will be glad you did.

                        go back over the past emails and look for some good instructions about
                        kraut.
                        People have been fermenting kraut and many other things for centuries.
                        You are just afraid because you have never been introduced to this kind of
                        food for at
                        least 2 generations. The doctors began to tell us that this was bad for us
                        and the food
                        companies began to heat it and put it into cans in the 50's.
                        They new the live raw properties of kraut was good for us.
                        If you heat or can kraut you destroy the great properties that help
                        digestion and clean the
                        liver. A cup a day at dinner time is the best way to eat it daily.
                        Can be eaten at lunch also.

                        Fermenting different vegetables, cheeses, breads and milks are the way to
                        go!



                        Happy eating!



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Ellis Hein
                        We make sauerkraut in quart jars and it does not stink up the house. If you can smell anything, it is a wonderful aroma that bears no resemblance to the odor
                        Message 11 of 21 , Aug 21, 2007
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                          We make sauerkraut in quart jars and it does not stink up the house. If you can smell anything, it is a wonderful aroma that bears no resemblance to the odor of commercial sauerkraut.

                          So, give it a try.

                          Ellis Hein
                          Casper, Wyoming
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: mwycheck
                          To: Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Monday, August 20, 2007 1:15 PM
                          Subject: [MN] sauerkraut


                          Hello,

                          Has anyone made sauerkraut? Does it stink up the whole house? My
                          husband won't let me make it if it does.

                          Thanks,
                          Mary





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Walk in the Woods
                          Mary writes: Has anyone made sauerkraut? Does it stink up the whole house? ~~~~~ Yes, I love making it and do several small batches when the fresh cabbage
                          Message 12 of 21 , Aug 21, 2007
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                            Mary writes: "Has anyone made sauerkraut? Does it stink up the whole house?"
                            ~~~~~

                            Yes, I love making it and do several small batches when the fresh cabbage comes ready for harvest. By small batches, I mean gallon batches and I often have more than one going at once. Plus batches of kimchi and the gods only know what else.

                            When folks enter my home the most common shared remark is how "good" it smells. It could be the herbs, the various ferments, but . . . "stink?" No, I've not yet heard that expression.

                            I say: Experiment, experience, it's the only way we truly learn! :)

                            Be well by Nature,

                            rose
                            http://walkinthewoods.byregion.net
                            http://www.myspace.com/walkinthewoods

                            "Our task must be to free ourselves by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty." ~ Albert Einstein





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Guru K
                            Last year I made some for the first time. I used a Ziplock bag of water on top. I could not find the recipe but I think the recipe was on the web by Ma
                            Message 13 of 21 , Aug 22, 2007
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                              Last year I made some for the first time. I used a Ziplock bag of
                              water on top. I could not find the recipe but I think the recipe was
                              on the web by Ma .....? It did not smell but was the best sauerkraut
                              I have ever had.

                              GB

                              --- In Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com, "Walk in the
                              Woods" <walkinthewoodsllc@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Mary writes: "Has anyone made sauerkraut? Does it stink up the
                              whole house?"
                              > ~~~~~
                              >
                              > Yes, I love making it and do several small batches when the fresh
                              cabbage comes ready for harvest. By small batches, I mean gallon
                              batches and I often have more than one going at once. Plus batches of
                              kimchi and the gods only know what else.
                              >
                              > When folks enter my home the most common shared remark is how
                              "good" it smells. It could be the herbs, the various ferments, but
                              . . . "stink?" No, I've not yet heard that expression.
                              >
                              > I say: Experiment, experience, it's the only way we truly learn! :)
                              >
                              > Be well by Nature,
                              >
                              > rose
                              > http://walkinthewoods.byregion.net
                              > http://www.myspace.com/walkinthewoods
                              >
                              > "Our task must be to free ourselves by widening our circle of
                              compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in
                              its beauty." ~ Albert Einstein
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            • gokhals
                              My daughter loves Beet Kvass. Its a non dairy ferment, and she is very comfortable with it, because for the longest time she could not eat dairy products. Thus
                              Message 14 of 21 , Jul 21, 2012
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                                My daughter loves Beet Kvass. Its a non dairy ferment, and she is very comfortable with it, because for the longest time she could not eat dairy products. Thus a jar of Kvass is always brewing on our kitchen counter.

                                I peel and cube a few beets, throw them in approx 3/4ths of a gallon of water, toss in a spoon or two of sea salt. Let it sit until its thick syrupy and sour (depending on temps, 2 to 6 days for us).

                                A furry layer of mold - Kaum - might form on top. There is less Kaum as you increase the proportion of salt in the Kvass. Kaum is harmless. Ignore it until you are ready to strain out the Kvass into bottles and store in a refrigerator. At that point, strain the Kaum out with a tea strainer. I use the beet dregs in the salads as condiments. They taste great.

                                Also, its kinda cool to serve the lurid purple Kvass in small wine glasses.

                                Con: The purple is very difficult to get out of clothes.

                                Cheers,
                                -Sush

                                --- In Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com, "Rachel Adler" <wapriceisright@...> wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                > I'm glad to see this discussion! I just made beet kvass (from NT) for
                                > the first time, and it tastes rather like dirt! I used organic beets
                                > (chopped fine), whey from my goat kefir, and organic sea salt. It was
                                > fermenting for 5 days - it needed that much time to do anything. Even
                                > so, I'm not sure if it needed more time.
                                >
                                > Yuck.
                                >
                                > Rachel
                                >
                              • Roger B
                                Sush, What is your average household temperature? Is this an anaerobic fermentation? If so, you could avoid the kaum by putting an air-lock on the jar. Is
                                Message 15 of 21 , Jul 21, 2012
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                                  Sush,

                                  What is your average household temperature?

                                  Is this an anaerobic fermentation? If so, you could avoid the kaum by putting an air-lock on the jar.

                                  Is this a lacto-fermentation? If so, one could pour some kefir whey into the mix and speed up the process. This would also reduce or eliminate the kaum.

                                  Feeding beet kvass that had white ick on it (at any time) to my boy would not go over real well with my wife.

                                  Roger

                                  To: Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com
                                  From: Gokhals@...
                                  Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2012 07:20:58 +0000
                                  Subject: Re: [MN] beetroot






























                                  My daughter loves Beet Kvass. Its a non dairy ferment, and she is very comfortable with it, because for the longest time she could not eat dairy products. Thus a jar of Kvass is always brewing on our kitchen counter.



                                  I peel and cube a few beets, throw them in approx 3/4ths of a gallon of water, toss in a spoon or two of sea salt. Let it sit until its thick syrupy and sour (depending on temps, 2 to 6 days for us).



                                  A furry layer of mold - Kaum - might form on top. There is less Kaum as you increase the proportion of salt in the Kvass. Kaum is harmless. Ignore it until you are ready to strain out the Kvass into bottles and store in a refrigerator. At that point, strain the Kaum out with a tea strainer. I use the beet dregs in the salads as condiments. They taste great.



                                  Also, its kinda cool to serve the lurid purple Kvass in small wine glasses.



                                  Con: The purple is very difficult to get out of clothes.



                                  Cheers,

                                  -Sush



                                  --- In Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com, "Rachel Adler" <wapriceisright@...> wrote:

                                  >

                                  >

                                  > I'm glad to see this discussion! I just made beet kvass (from NT) for

                                  > the first time, and it tastes rather like dirt! I used organic beets

                                  > (chopped fine), whey from my goat kefir, and organic sea salt. It was

                                  > fermenting for 5 days - it needed that much time to do anything. Even

                                  > so, I'm not sure if it needed more time.

                                  >

                                  > Yuck.

                                  >

                                  > Rachel

                                  >


















                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Lynn McGaha
                                  NT says to chop the beets coarsely. If you chopped them too fine, maybe the beets exuded too much juice, which can result in a too rapid fermentation that
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Jul 21, 2012
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                                    NT says to chop the beets coarsely. If you chopped them too fine, maybe the
                                    beets exuded too much juice, which can result in a too rapid fermentation
                                    that favors the production of alcohol rather than lactic acid. NT
                                    directions also say to keep at room temperature for 2 days before
                                    transferring to refrigerator. In my experience it didn't seem like anything
                                    happened in 2 days, but I followed that direction, and my kvass was always
                                    tasty.

                                    Lynn


                                    --- In Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com, "Rachel Adler"
                                    <wapriceisright@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > I'm glad to see this discussion! I just made beet kvass (from NT) for
                                    > the first time, and it tastes rather like dirt! I used organic beets
                                    > (chopped fine), whey from my goat kefir, and organic sea salt. It was
                                    > fermenting for 5 days - it needed that much time to do anything. Even
                                    > so, I'm not sure if it needed more time.
                                    >
                                    > Yuck.
                                    >
                                    > Rachel
                                  • gokhals
                                    Roger, Apologies for the late reply. Its been a busy year, between work, fermentation and travel. Its the SF Bay area, so home temperature is around 65 I would
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Jun 22, 2013
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                                      Roger,

                                      Apologies for the late reply. Its been a busy year, between work, fermentation and travel.

                                      Its the SF Bay area, so home temperature is around 65 I would say. I thought of airlocking, it would definitely prevent the aerobic fungal fermentation on top. But generally I just strain off the kaum, and drink the kvass. Its harmless. Katz says its ok to even stir it back in.

                                      I take it off for the sake of other members of my family, who do not like sippy/chewy drinks, and have expressed horror at some of my experiments from time to time.

                                      Cheers,
                                      Sush

                                      --- In Microbial_Nutrition@yahoogroups.com, Roger B <rogerbird2@...> wrote:

                                      > Sush,
                                      > What is your average household temperature?
                                      > Is this an anaerobic fermentation? If so, you could avoid the kaum by putting an air-lock on the jar.
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